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Full text of "Scrapbook, 1898-1903"



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4&W 



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444th CONCERT 

Given by the Professors of the 

Ipbtlabelpbia Musical Hcafcem^ 

At their Hall, 1617 Spruce St. 
SATURDAY EVENING, NOVEMBER 12, 

At 8 o'clock. 

IProgrammc. 

TRIO— Piano, Violin and Violoncello. Op. ^ ... Chaminade 

a. Allegro moJerato. b. Lento. r. Allegro energico. 

Mess. Richard Zeckwer, H. Rattay, R. Hennig. 

VOCAL— " Gewitternacht," R. Zeckwer 

Miss Marie Buedinger. 

VIOLIN SOLO-"Foliesd'Espagne," Corelli 

Mr. G. Hille 
PIANO SOLI— "Paysage" \ 

- Polonaise E major" I ' <->^ 1 

Mr. W. Leps 

VOCAL— Air from " Nachtlager in Granada," Kreutzer 

(With violin obligatol 
Mr. Carl Schachner 

VIOLONCELLO SOLO-tf. Adagio Goenz 

b. Tarantelle Popper 

Mr. R. Hennig. 

ORGAN SOLO— a. Toccata I 

b. Fiat lux I Dubois 

Mr. L. Howe 

PIANO DUO— Galop Chromatique Us:l 

Mess. M. Leefson and C. Samans. 

ADMISSION, 50 CTS. 

The Suinuay Grand Pianos have been furnished by N. Stetson, ,*,„ Chestnut St. 






If Iff . 






Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/scrapbook189819000phil 



447TH CONCERT 

Given by the Pupils of the 

Ipbilabelpbia flfcusical Hcabem^ 

At their Hall, 1617 Spruce St. 
MONDAY EVENING, DECEMBER 5, 

At 8 o'clock. 

Iproijramme. 

PIANO— a. Novelette in F ■ • Schumann 

b. Fruehlingsnacht . . . ". Sch.umann-L.isst 

Miss Grace Houseman. 

VOCAL-Summer Cham.nade 

Miss E. Pattee 

PIANO— a. Album blaetter Nos. I and 2 1 Schumann 

b. Scherzo, op. 94. J 

Miss F. Doris 

VIOLIN— Love Song • G - HllU 

Mr. R. Leucht 

PIANO — Soire de Vienne, No. 6 Liszt 

Miss A. Turner 

VOCAL— Rosemonde Chammadc 

Miss A. Reifsnyder 

PIANO DUET— 3 Polkas de Concert Gruenfeld 

Misses M. Culley and M. Albert 

VOCAL -Air from Traviata Verdi 

Miss E. Hoppe 

PIANO— Witches' Dance MacDowell 

Miss A. Gause 

VIOLIN— Fantasie Caprice Vieuxtemps 

Mr. J. Falk 

VOCAL— a. Sunshine Grieg 

b. With Myrtle and Roses Schumann 

Miss I. Nachod 

PIANO— a. Spinning Girl . . . Raff 

b. Schatzwalzer Slrauss-Schuctt 

Miss C. Darlington 

VOCAL— Die Forelle Schubert 

Miss E. Glueckerts 

PIANO— Capriccio, op. 22 Mendelssohn 

Orchestral accompaniment for 2d piano ) 
Miss E. Smith 

VOCAL— Fiore che langue Rotoli 

Miss F. Bower 

PI AXO— Concert, g minor Mendelssohn 

a. Allegro con fuoco. b. Adagio. c. Presto. 

Miss Elsie Hand 

PIANO QUARTETTE— Suite Peer Gynt Grieg 

Misses L. Reed, C. Deal, L. Wicks, M. Taylor 



The Steinway Grand Pianos have been furnished by N. Stetson, 1209 Chestnut 






THIRTEENTH CONCERT 
. . . THE flliUjWNl . . . 

Ipbilabelpbia flIMtstcal Bcabem^ 

At the Hall. 1617 Spruce St. 
SATURDAY EVENING, DECEMBER 10, 

At 8 o'clock. 

IProQramme. 

Duo for Two Pianos— Walzer v , ]Vlh „ 

Mrs. Charles M. Taylor and Miss Bessie Davis. 

VOCAL-a. Joy Unspoken Sllduy 

b. Spring Song . . ' Gounod 

Mr. Carl Schachner. 

PIANO— Sonata. D minor, op. 31, No. 2 Beethoven 

a. Allegro. b. Adagio. c. Allegretto. 
Miss Jessie Fulweiler. 

VIOLIN-Ballade et Polonaise Vieu.rtemps 

Mr. Julius Falk. 

ORGAN— Fanfare Lemmeus 

Miss Nora Burke. 

VOCAL— Aria, " Una voce poca fa," . Rossini 

Miss Dominga Lynch. 

PIANO— a. Love Dreams, Notturno I Liszt 

b. Scherzo. B minor '. Chopin 

Miss Jessie Fulweiler. 

VIOLIN-Fantasie Caprice Vieuxtemps 

Mr. Julius Falk 
PIANO QUARTETTE— Ouverture, Midsummer Night's Dream. 

Mendelssohn 
I Piano— Misses Davis and Sower. 
II Piano— Misses Martin and de la Cova. 



Jfe/^ 



flfcusical jfunb Iball 

2nd S eason Xocust st ' aborc Ei9btb 

1898 99 Twenty 4* 

¥ Symphony Concerts 



HENRY GORDON THUNDER, Condu 



Friday Afternoons, at 3.30 P. M., from November 18 to March 31 
FOURTH CONCERT, DECEMBER 9th 



Soloist, RICHARD /ICkWhR. 
The changes in the Program are necessitated by the i 



SYMPHONY No. 1, B flat, op. 38 

a. Andante un poco maestoso. Aliegro mollo vivace 

(The conductor i> responsible for the alterations in the bras: 

b. Larghetto -r 

<-. Scherzo, Molto vivace 

J. Allegro animate e grazioso 



Air. Robert Tempest, 

SCHUMANN 



A sketch of the steppes of Central Asia 

(In the silence of the sandy steppes of Central 
peace. One hears also the melancholy sounds of the Or 
step of horses and camels- A caravan escorted by Russian 
fearlesslv on its wav, trustinc fullv to the guard 
The songs of the Rt!-,i.ir,s ,'nd th.se of the r 
heard a long time in the desert, and are finally l< 



CONCERTO, D major, "Coronation" 
a. Allegro 

b. Larghetto 



heard the first refrain « 



<■£■■ 



Ulc-oH-tt'i 



SUITE, "Peer Gynt," No. I, op. 46 C 

a. Morning. Allegretto pastorale 

b. The Death of Ase. Andante doloroso 

c. Anitra's Dance. Tempo di mazurka 

d. In the Hall of the Mountain King. Alia i 



The STEINWAY Piano used i 



i of N. STETSON & CO.. 1209 Chestnut St 

me. Symphony. No. 7. 
and Arms." "Samson." 



Thunder's Symphony 
Organization. 

EXCELLENT ATTENDANCE 



Papa Zeckwer Plays the Mozart 
Concerts Well. 



Yesterday, Mr. Henry Gordon Thun- 
der gave his fourth Symphony concert 
at Musical Fund Hall. There "was a 
greater attendance at this concert than 
at any of the previous ones of this 



Did they come to hear Papa Zeckwer, 
or was it to hear that genius of the 
piano. Robert Tempest, of whom Phil- 
adelphia should well be proud? 

I confess feeling somewhat disap- 
pointed when I read the notice of Mr. 
Tempesfs illness, not casting any re- 
flections on the playing of Papa Zeck- 
wer, who gave us the Mozart Concerto 
In his usual inimitable manner. 

The programme of yesterday's con- 
cert was an admirable one, made up 
altogether, with the exception of the 
piano concerto, from the composers of 
the romantic school. 

Schuman was represented by Mb No. 
1, B flat Symphony and Grieg, by his 
ever popular "Peer Gynt" Suite, 

The "Borochy" number was a nov- 
elty, both new and striking. The rep- 
resenting of the sandy steppes of Cen- 
tral Asia by a symphony orchestra, 
seems rather far fetched, however, 
those long drawn out A and B har- 
monics of the first viol In represent 
the dreary waste of unmeasurable 
sand I suppose, so we will have to let 

Certainly the "Borochln" composi- 

thtrsty. Programme music of this 
sort, with Its Oriental chants, march- 
ing camels and horses, caravans, Rus- 
sian soldiers, etc.. Is to much for any 
one's imagination. Then, again, the 
solos given to such melodta Instru- 
ments as the bass tuba, double bass, 
bassoon, cymbals, drums, etc seems 
delightful. 

" sympt 



The rendering of 






the Scherzo should have 
.ken faster. 
Of Mr. Thunder's 



utifully given, 
so. with its pianissimo enects. 

its muted strings, A*as somewhat i 
red by the use of too large a tria 
(its tone was heavy*; The Alia mc 
with Its ever increasing tempo 
given magnificently 



ng the Prologue from "Pagllscci" 

elude compositions by Bach, Handel 
and Goldmark. 

J. P. WOODSIDE. 






Fourth Symphony Concert 

Tho fourth of the series of twenty sym- 
phonr concerts ;, t M»s,,:,l Komi H,f was 
'■■von vesterdav afternoon. "Tien the ex- 
cellVnt'orcbo^tra conduct «d lor Hcnr; i,or- 
ilon Thunder, assisted by Richard Zed, 
ner piano soloist, entertained an audi- 
ence of ransV-lovlnc people. The first 
number was Schumann . symphony No. 1, 
B flat opus'xS. and it was admirably ren- 
dered The "Sketch of the Steppes of Cen- 
tral Wa." hv Borodin, called for delicate 
execution and It was especially appre 
elated. On account of till 
pest, the vocal soloist, w 



Tom 



lay afternoon Joseph C. 
Cousans. the baritone, will be the soloist. 
Beethoven's symphony No. 7 will be the; 
l.rst [luaiOer on the program, which will 

.1 E , lection from ••Pagliaccl." 1 
an aria by Bacti and others. 



-6- . 17 

Ml 



CONCERT 

Given by the Pupils of the 
GERIWANTOUJN BRANCH 

IPbilabelpbm musical Hcabem? 

At 6029 Main Street, Germantown, 
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 17th, 1898, 



programme. 

SYMPHONY CLASS-Rondo ... „ „ . 

Miss E. Caveny, Miss M. Bullus' ' 

Miss F. Caveny, Miss A . Audenried 

PIANO-" Cradle Song," 



Mis- Marion Arnold 



Kullak 



PIANO 

PIANO— Serenade . 
PIANO— Tarantelle 
PIANO— Scherzo, op 



Waltz of the Forest Sprite," Kru<r 

Miss Lilly Barton. 

' Gabriel 

Miss Carrie Wagner. 

'.'■•-■. Scharwenka 

Miss Nannie Kyle. 



Miss Florence Doriss. 



SYMPHONY CLASS-Serenade . . Siull/ 

Miss M. Bullus, Miss A . Audenried.' 

Miss L. Cope, Miss F _ Cavenv 



PIANO-" Cradle 



Song. 



Miss E. Perot 

PIANO-" The Happy Hunter." Engelmann 

Miss E. LeBoutillier 

PIANO-W.ltz.-U Petite," . Ratkiun 

Miss B. McNamee. 

PIANO-" The Returning Huntsman," Guyliu 

Master L. Lightfoot. 
SYMPHONY CLASS— Gavotte . 



Miss F. Cavern- 
Miss E. Caveny, 
PIANO— a. Song Without Word; 

PIANO— Concerto, 



Silas 



M. Bullus, 



A. Audenried. 

'/ 

Miss Florence Bisel. 

. . . Mo-art 



Miss Florence Caveny. 
SYMPHONY CLASS-' ■ Danse Macabre, " <,„,„ Saeni 

Miss F. Caveny. Miss L. Cdpe 

Miss M. Bullus, Misg E . Ca ' venVp 



The Su, „„.,-, 



ush. J by ? 



BROAD ST n-lEATI/t TUESDAY. DEC. 6, 1898 



RECITAL 



Mrs. Helen Boice-Hunsicker 



Music Teachers' 
National Association. 



ARNOLD J. OANTVOORT. President. 



Wf&C 



- y \l^Lo^ 



Cincinnati, $■ December $, t$Q$- 



^ 



'^AZurfstf 



fast special business-sessio//of the Delegate-Council of the 

..In a Multitude of Counselors There is Wisdom.' 
TV,, relation wishes to know what vor, as representative musicians 

t;l: i ;:,;;:,u.x^. 1 v„ t ,,n, a.***) h.,***..****' 

essiop. 

Y0MS £mCerely ' A . J. OABWOOBT. 

M- p. s. Don't forget the time of the first session-Dec. 2(5. 3 p. rn. 



The STtlNWAY PIANO is kindly furnished 
from the warerooms, 



Questions for Round-Table Discussion. 



1. The Delegate Council 

ioi Its Origlnand Purposes Mr. H. W. Greene. 

(o) Its Possibilities Mr. Percy E. Goetschins, 

(c) Its times of meeting Mr. .Taroslov de Zielinski. 

id) Its Powers Mr. Win. Edward Mulligan. 

2. What should be the office of the M. T. N. A., as an organization, in 
the Musical Art Life of the Nation and of its members, and how may this 
be accomplished ? 

Mr. Carl G. Schmidt, Mr. Constantin Sternberg, Mr. W. W, Gilchrist, 

Mrs. Kay I'iei , Mr. Percy Goetschins, Mr. Geo. C. Gow 

3. How shall the members of the different branches of the musical 
profession be aroused to special interest in the Annual Meetings of the 
M. T. N. A. without any branch being given more than its rightful share 
of attention on the program: 

(ai The Piano Teachers Mr. Constantin Sternberg. 

1 b ) The Voice Teachers Mr. Edmund J. Myers, Mr. Frank H. Tubbs. 

(c) The Teachers on Stringed Instruments. 

i</) The Organ Teachers Mr. Walter Henry Hall. 

(el The Creative Musicians Mr. W. W. Gilchrist, 

(/') Music Department, of Colleges & Universities Mr. Geo. C. Gow. 

(<?; Hie Public School Music Teachers Mr. H. C. Harding. 

4. Membership Fees and Dues: 

(a) What should be the Initial Active Membership Fee? Mr. J. S. Bergen. 

(b) What should be the Annual Dues after the 

Initial Membership Fee lias been paid? Mr. E. T. Baldwin. 

(c) Should a Professional Worker in Our Art be 
a full member upon payment of the initial 
membership fee, or should he be expected to 
pay dues for one year after the payment of 
his membership fee before being considered a 

full active member? Mr. R. Zeekwer. 

( d) Permanent Associate i non-professional ) Mem- 
berships— how can they be secured and what 

should be their annual dues? M rs. Albert Carson Bruce. 

If J How may Our Membership be made more 

Permanent and less Floating? Dr . N Elsenheimer, 



;". How Shall Annual Meeting Places for the Association be Selected? 
Shall we enter into correspondence with different cities to ascertain what 
inducements they will offer the Association to come to them, in exchange 
for the stimulus to the musical life of those cities which the Association 
can undoubtedly confer? 

Mr. J. S. Bergen, Mr. C. T. Croxton, 

6. Shall the M. T. N. A. make an effort to collect a permanent fund, 
which shall be placed in the hands of a board of trustees, and whose inter- 
est only shall be available to meet the necessary expenses of the Associa- 
tion in the furthering of the interests of American Musicians and Musical 
Art in general throughout the United States? 

Dr. S. N. Penfield, Mr. Richard Zeekwer, Mr. Waldo S. Pratt, 

Mr. Benj. Jenson, Mr. Constantin Sternberg, Mr. Carl T. Whitmer, 

Mr. F. E. Howard and others. 

7. Literature Concerning the M. T. N. A. 

(a) Shall the Association from time to time issue 
reports of its intentions, its policy, etc., other 
than the regular Annual Report of Pro- 
ceedings? Mr. Theo. Presser. 

(b) Shall the Association have an official organ, 
published monthly, bi-monthly, or quarterly, 
to which each member will be considered a 
subscriber by virtue of the payment of his 
ini tial membership fee, and to which subscrip- 
tions from othersi non-members i shall be solic- 
ited: the contents of the organ to consist 
purely of matters pertaining to the Associa- 
tion, such as its programs, suggestive articles 

on these programs, etc , Mr. Arthur L.Manchester. 



8. Our Financial Status. 

Mr. Fred A. Fowler. 

9. The Constitution — Its Needs. 

Mr. John Tagg, Mr. Carl Schmidt. 

10. The Meeting of '99. 

Mr. A. .T. Gantvoort. 



PROGRAM 



Vainka's Song - 

Irish Polk Song 

A Song of Thanksgiving 



A Pastoral (from Veracini's Opera of " Rosalinda") 

arr. by A. L. 

Fntreaty ----'.. Smith 

Dich, Theure Halle - - (Tannhauser) Wagner 



Harp Solo— Melodie Classique 



The Erl-King 

She is a Winsome Wee Thing 

Nobody Knows - 



Schubert 

Mrs. Swift 

Lemon 



f Once There Was A King of Thule ) 
< y ■ (Faust) Gounod 

(dewel Song 5 



PROGRAM 



harp Solo- Serenade 



The Ould Plaid Shawl 

Evensong - 

Gome To fte - 

Thou Art Like Unto A Flower 

Heart's Delight 



Haynes 

- Kjerulf 

Btmberg 

R. Zeckwer 

W. W.Gilchrist 



Harp Solo— Selection from the Opera of 
"/^aritana" 



Songs for Children : 

The Slumber Islands - - Loud 

Meg /Aerriles - - Margaret Lang 

Sleepy Song - Basye 

Bo-Peep - Rosabel 



}*■ 



-4 "1st CONCERT 

GIVEN BY PUPILS OF THE 

Ipbilabclpbia Musical Hcabem\> 

At their Hall, 1617 Spruce Street 
THURSDAY EVENING, JANUARY 26th, 1899 

AT EIGHT O'CLOCK 

[programme 

,._,,. Norwegian Bridal Procession Grieg 

b. En Couraut - Godard 

Miss Fredrica Costa 

2. — ,,. Valse Lente Schuett 

b. Polish Mazurka Scharwenka 

Mrs. \V. S. Remont 

J.— a. Scherzo Jadassohn 

b. Butterfly Grieg 

Miss Helen Campbell 

4.— «. Arabesque Ckaminade 

!>. Valse Chopin 

Miss Carrie Haywood 

Vocal— u. Autumn From 

6. Through the Valley 

Miss A. Turner 

5.— ,7. Polish Mazurka Selianecnka 

/>. Menuelte Selutbert 

Miss Abbie Graf 

6. — Sonate First movement) Schubert 

Miss Laura Wood 

7.— Polacca Brillante Weber 

Mrs. J. Buchanan 

S.— Two Etudes Chopin 

Miss Cornelia Darlington 

Vocal— Air from Lucrezia Donizetti 

Miss 1-:. Mohr 

9.— a. Tarautelle Raff 

b. Humoresque de Concert Paderewski 

Miss Clure Ring 

io.—.j. Nocturne Liszt 

b. Scherzo 1 B Minor) Chopin 

Miss Jessie l-'uhveiler 

11.- Fantasie (F Minor) Chopin 

Miss Elsie Hand 

12.— Ballade Keiuecke 

Mr. Fred Linde 

Tl,.- StciTTO.iy G...nJ h.is ivun furmslKi 1 N - . ,,„„ Street. 



ad' a Musical Aca- 
„ny Pupils' Recital. 
'highly successful; 

•ts of Careful Training Grati- 1 
, fyingly Exemplified. _ I 



lll~ Klalr llnn.i 
. ■!-. . .■ :... ]■. ... .,;i-i Orclieetra, op. L6 



■v/C. ty , 



Jlclvi 



ilLS' ORCHESTRA 



fy r v 



452d CONCERT 



& 



Given by Pupils of me 

Philadelphia . . . 
Musical Academv 

-MUSICAL riiND ham 

5th and Locust Sts 



Saturday Evening, February 4th 



AT EIGHT O'CLOa; 



/ lUjLj 



, " , ! i ;r/ , 7»'"'» A*" 5 -• Fr:,u I- F. Wlster ' 

' . '.:!'' .1 I. 11:111.. 



Ind :>.i.,,i J ,,.-.. 

.■.■.""11™". ■ 



}n ■ 



A~ 


>lst CONCERT 






GIVEN BY PUPILS OF THE 






Ipbilabelpbta Musical 


Hcabem\> 


At th 


eir Hall, 1617 Spruce Street 




THURSDAY EVENING, JANUARY 26th, 1899 




AT EIGHT O'CLOCK 








IProgramme 




dal Procession 




Grieg 




Mis, Fredrica Costa 
























.Mrs. \V. S. Remont 






:■,.—,?. Scherzo . . 






. . Jadassohn 




Miss Helen Campbell 






a Arabesque 






- Chaminade 










Miss Carrie Haywood 






(>. Tliroi 


gh the Valley 

Miss A. Turner 






5 .—,i. Polish Mazur 
/). Menuette . 


Ka 

Miss Abbie Graf 




Schanvenka 
- - Schubert 


6.— Senate i First mo\ 


Miss Laura Wood 




. - Schubert 




Mrs. J. Buchanan 






S.— Two Etudes . . 


Miss Cornelia Darlington 




. Chop,,, 


Vocal— Air from 


Lucrezia 

Miss E. Mora- 




. Dotiizctti 


9.-12. Tarantelle . 
i. Humoresque 


le Concert 

Miss Claire Ring 




. . Raff 


IO ,, Nocturne 














. Cho[>, 11 






n.— Fantasie (I- Mino 


Miss Elsie Hand 




. . Chopin 


12.— Ballade .... 


Mr. Fred Linde 




,_ mu — - 







PUPILS ORCHESTRA 



UNDER THE 



PROF. CUSTAV HILLE 



1 VIOLINS 
Miss E. Wood 
Miss E. Swift 
Miss G. Keppelmau 
Mr. J. Falk 
Miss A. Miles 
Miss F. Wister 
Miss C. Andrew 
Mr. S. Compton 



II VIOLINS 

Miss A. Baker 
Mr. L,. Frescoln 
Miss A. Grebe 
Miss G. Graf 
Miss P. Boyd 
Miss F. Keen 
Miss M. McLean 
Miss M. Waldo 
Mr. L- Freeman 
Mr. M. Kirk 
Mr. H. Heller 



VIOLA 

Mr. B. Leucht 
J. Hopkins 

Dr. Thatcher 



VIOLONCELLO 

Mr. L. Vollmer 



DOUBLE BASS 



H. Rattay 

Flutes— Miss E. Auchinbaugh 

Mr. H. Dox 
Oboes — Miss M. Shapley 
Clarinette — Miss L. Wood 
-Miss E- Lorenz 



H. L. Albrecht, (Teacher) 

Horns— Mr. U. Smith, Jr. 
Trumpets — Mr. H. Barker 
Trombones — Miss C. Ring 
Timpani — Mr. F. Linde 
Bass Drum — Mr. E. Knoppel 
Triangle — Miss E. Hand 



programme 

CONCERTO for Two Violins with String Orchestra Back 

I. Vivace 

Miss Ada Miles and Miss Frances F. Wister 

II. Largo ma non troppa 

III. Allegro 

Misses Edith Wood and E. Swift 
CONCERTO, for Piano and Orchestra First Movement . . Schumann 

Mr. H. Welsh 
VOCAL DUO, The Gypsies Brahms 

Misses L. Garrison and I. Stafford 

CONCERTO For violin, and Orchestra j Second and third . Mendelssohn 
\ movement 

Miss Gertrude Keppelman 

PIANO SOLO, a. Reve Angelique Rubinstein 

b. Berceuse Chopin 

c. Fairy Story Raff 

Miss Elsie Hand 

CONCERTO for Piano and Orchestra, op. 16 Grieg 

First Movement 

, Miss L. Fisher Corbin 
Second and Third Movements 
Miss E. Winter 

CHURCH SCENE (From Faust) Gounod 

Miss L. Jones and Mr. A. Hinckley, with Chorus 

BALLET MUSIC (From 3d act of Queen of Saba Goldmark 

a. Moderate, b. Allegretto, c. Dance of Bees, d. Moderate, 
e. Bachanale, with Chorus 

TheSteinway Grand Piano has been furnished by N. Stetsom, 1209 Chestnut Street 
The Mason & Hamlin Organ furnished by Fischer, 1710 Chestnut Street 



453d CONCERT 

GIVEN BY PUPILS OF THE 

(Pbtlabelpbta Musical Hcabem^ 

AT THEIR HALL, 1617 SPRUCE STREET 
FRIDAY EVENING FEBRUARY 10, 1899 

AT EIGHT O'CLOCK 

programme 

CONCERTO, D Minor, (First Movement) Mozart 

Miss C. Quinton 

SONATE, A' Major Mozart 

a. Theme and Variations 
*. Turkish March 

Miss M. Seese 
IMPROMPTU, a. Fantasie Impromptu \ 

b. Etude in E Major I ' ' ' ' ' °^" n 

Miss A. Turner 

VOCAL, a. Thou art like unto a flower Schumann 

b. I'm wearing awa Foole 

Miss Freda Bower 

TRAUMEREI and ROMANZE Schumann 

Miss M. Lake 

a. Harvest Song Tschaikowski 

b. Suite op 50 (Last Movement) Moszkowski 

c. Perpetual Motion MacDowell > ' 

Miss E Lorenz 

VOCAL, Kinderland Brahms 

Miss L. Strafford 

a. Moonlight -1 

b. The Brook \ MacDowell 

c. The Eagle > 

Miss E. Glenn 

VOCAL, The Heather is Brawn Franz 

Miss I. Nachod 

VALSE A FLAT Moszkowski 

Miss E. Pearce 

VOCAL QUINTETTE, Serenade Schubert 

Misses Bower, Glueckert, Nachod, Stafford, Bennet 

SONATE PATHETIQUE, (Last Movement) Beethoven 

Mr. H. Barker 

SONG, From Seapieces MacDowell 

Miss M. Guillermine 

TWO VOCAL TRIOS HeymawRheinecke 

Miss E. Glueckert, I. Nachod, L. Stafford 

ORGAN SOLO, Sonate, No. 8 (First Movement) .... Rheinberger 

Dr. Gertrude Walker 

MOMENTO CAPRIOCIO Westerhout 

Mr. E. Crothers 

VOCAL. Hear ye Israel Mendelssohn 

Miss L. Garrison 

ORGAN, Offertoire Batiste 

MissK. O'Donnell 

The Steinway Grand Piano lias been furnished by N. Stetson, .209 Chestnut Street 




ALUMNI 



Philadelphia 
H Musical 
Academy 

SEASON 1595-99 
SECOND CONCERT 

SATURDAY EVENING, EERRUARY 1 1 

AT o O'CLOCK 
1617 SPRUCE STREET 



454th CONCERT 

GIVEN BY PUPILS OF THE 

pbtlabelpbta Musical Hcafcem^ 

At their Hall, 1617 Spruce Street, 
FRIDAY EVENING, MARCH 3rd 

At 8 o'clock 

PROGRAMME 

SONATE, C Minor Mozart 

Miss A. Irwin 

a. Des Abends ) Schumann 

b. Grillen I 

Miss C. Deal 

VOCAL, Aria from Mignon Thomas 

Mrs. B. Richmond 
SUITE, For Piano Ole Olseti 

a. Teufelstanz. b. Mazurka, c. Serenade. 
d. Humoresque. e. Papillons. 

Miss C. Luebs 
IMPROMPTU, Op 142 Schubert 

Miss C. Bains 

VOCAL, Arie of Siebel from Faust Gounod 

Miss M. Peale 
RONDO, in A Minor Mozart 

Miss L. Reed 

CONCERTO, No 2. (First Movement) Beethoven 

Cadenza by Reinecke 

Miss B. Hern 
VOCAL, a. Once in thine eyes Franz 

b. Souls of flowers Massenett 

c. A Spring rapsody Leoncavallo 

Miss A. Reifsnyder 

SONATE— for Piano and Violin, F major Beethoven 

Miss E. Glenn and Mr. J. Falk 

RONDO BRILLANTE Weber 

Miss C. Meile 

KAMMENOI OSTROW Rubinstein 

Miss L. Wick 

a. Album Blaetter N 1 and 2 Schumann 

b. Etude op 25 N 9 Chopin 

Miss N. Pfeiffer 
NACHTSTUECK Ph Scharwenka 

Miss M. Culley 
SCHERZO Sinding 

Miss E. Mohr 

VOCAL, Song of the Golden Calf from Faust Gounod 

Mr. Allen Hinkley 

a. Gavotte Bach-St. Saens 

b. Barcarolle Rubinstein 

c. Toccata Chaminade 

Miss L. Cope 

BALLADE, G Minor Chopin 

Miss M. Taylor 

QUARTETTE, Slavonic Dances Dvorak 

Misses Deal, Reed, Wick, Taylor 

The Steinwav Grand Piano has been furnished by N. Stetson. 1209 Chestnut St. 



f tf 



r 



©fficers 

President, Mr. Powell G. Fithian 

Vice President, Miss S. C. Sower 

Secretary, Miss Bessie S. Davis 

Treasurer, Mr. F. E. Cresson 

Executive Committee 

Miss E. C. Fitzpatrick, 
Miss E. de la Cova, 
Miss Jessie Fulweiler, 
Miss Jean B. Martin, 
Miss Charlotte Dallett, 
Miss Laura Wood, 
Mrs. Charles M. Taylor, Jr. 

Thonoran? Members. 



Mr. Richard Zeckwer, 
Mr. Maurits Leefson, 
Mr. Gustav Hille, 
Mr. W. W. Gilchrist, 
Miss Marie Budinger, 



Mr. David Wood, 
Mr. Rudolph Hennig, 
Mr. Pasquale Rondinella, 
Mr. Carl Samans, 
Mr. Carl Schachner. 



ALUMNI 



OP THE 



Philadelphia 
H Musical 
Academy 

SEASON 1595-99 



SECOND CONCERT 

SATURDAY EVENING, EERRUARY 1 1 



AT 5 O'CLOCK 



1617 SPRUCE STREET 



I 



programme 

i 

I DUO, for two Pianos — Impromptu on a theme from " Manfred" 

Schumann-Reinecke 
Misses Bessie Davis and Adele Sotor 

f«. The Bell of Life. 1 

II VOCAL- \ . [ Petrie 

y b. Asleep in the deep. J 

Mr. Powell G. Fithian 

III VIOLIN— Oriental Rhapsodie Hille 

Mr. Gustav Hille 

IV VOCAL DUETT— Autumn Song Mendelssohn 

Mrs. George Gebbie and Miss Agnes Reifsnyder 

V PIANO— Sonate Ph. Em. Bach, 1714-17SS 

Allegro deciso Andante expressivo Allegro motto 

Mr. Maurits Leefson 



programme 



VOCAL QUAKXBTTE-Gipsy^e.^^ 

MRS. GEBBIE Miss REIFSNY DER 

Miss pattee 



VIOLIN-Eantasie (" Canner £) 



MR. GUStAV HILLE 



Bizet-Hubay 
. . Clay 



"""^""t^'— 



Nicholas Rubensteh 



tv PIANO-Valse de Concert 

IX P MR. MAURIS LEEFSON 



x T WO ^^^^Merrv Wives of Windsor" 



Nicola i 



UV T „ TAYLOR JR. ^ MISS DAVIS ' 



vZ' it 



457th CONCERT 



{pbtlafcelpbta Musical Hcabem>2 

AT THEIR HALL 

1617 SPRUCE STREET 
Saturday Evening, February 25, 1899 

At Eight O'clock 



PROGRAMME 

SONATE, for Piano and Violin, op. 6 J° se f We ' ss 

a. Allegro energico. b. Romange. 
c. Intermezzo, d. Allegro Molto. 

Misses M. Leefson and G. Hille. 

PIANO SOU-^ ^ ^^ to r Zeckwer } ph . scharwenka 

b. Oriental Danee St " din S 

c. Song of the Rhine Daughters Wagner-Stnger 

Mr. R. Zeckwer 

VOCAL — a- Staendchen \ Brahms 

b. Sehwalbe sage mir > 

c. Romanze Schumann 

Mr. C. Schachuer 

VIOLONCELLO SOLO-a. Elegie ■ Bazzzm 

b. Scherzo V** Goenz 

Mr. R. Hennig 
VIOLIN SOLO— a. Ballade (dedicated to Mr. Hille) . Moszkowski 
b. Bolero 

Mr. H. Rattay 

VOCAL — a. Murmuring Zephyrs \ Jensen 

' | b. Am Ufer des Manzanares > 

Mr. C. Schachuer 
TRIO-for Piano, Violin and Violoncello, Op. 100 . . Ph Scharwenka 
a. Lento e Tranquillo. b. Allegro, c. Allegro appassionata 
Messrs. W. Leps, G. Hille, R. Hennig. 

ADMISSION, 50 CENTS 

The Steinway Grand Piano has been furnished by 
N. Stetson, 1209 Chestnut Street 






WITH HI TEACHERS 

Philadelphia Acade- 
my's Concert. 
'what should be done 

American Compositions for 
i American Pupils. 



Just 
! n'g H, v .. u * ..niiucipnia Muslca 

i»5,ir.*-„:: K™:;a,~;i.": 
, «.«.« a t .„,,, own . nall 1617 x?„,: 

the themselves" "H 1 " 1 " " ° r Wil " 
I i memsenes can accomplish, in 
nchttj or the musical 
The purpose of this article Is not so ,' 

attention of .h^men t, , are ffi 

'"steal matters alwavs 

nusiclans should advance 
i, - -----*™is of American comndsen 

by giving: them fair representation en 

eir conceit programmes." 
thf. a^' W6 . K ° * S ' eP fan ' her than 
I should"oum y "' at Ameri "" IM ' I,! " ! 

I them to play American compositions ° 

n this respect? 
Their programmes do not lnd'cah 
| that they have. "»o.cat« 

Hs* rhe,!, aa L c01K ' m eIve:1 »y their pu. 
, -n Am\rica"^m; t oter 1 ^n e ., , ; U o n >;.„ e D1 !o > ' 

I B^n^STc. aSfe* "d" nlanv 
>"ght out at 
' the resi'iirT";. f'?" 1 " 5 ' ""certs, as 
intelligence bra " 13 al,J musical 

aSnTto tloo^ttS. "J"* composi- 

A^ca^^lcl^s^^^"'- 



fhemsej\ 



his 



' !° Kurope to sludv, i 

ib?" , '.' oh,v "' nl i 




He glories In pia'yln"* - hc . ' „ . 

.d n .ssasrr,? d , '»° n h, » *«• 

am ?...* "Kernretatlons of the 

I you Uno e wT , 6 f,,r„. , d 1 *u„Se l ,! ,e , : h ""'''• ' 
that wrote , B en>" a und *' >"• "»«* 

! sultTolW^r," 1 "<" th » ""le re-' 

iowS3«i l ,? r ,s '°° '"Odes', t 
mno^ltUns we '»"l""< of his 

sooner remedied die 



"ycviauv Ttie 

remedied the 



There could i« 
sous way to build 

e. than io mn ,«.„"'' , ^-«"uu 

pupels famlllai "with ' |. y ra,kl "e the 

They will add gres"* ■■ 






encourage 



r 






^|*S.!:.p 



i:.:. 



8 



1 Performer.. 

I tall here. 

|_ The i rogramme was 



THURSDAYS at 3.30 P.M. 

From Nov. J Oth, 1898 to March 23d, 1899 



Germania Orchestral 

^Symphony Concerts 

WM. STOLL, JR, Conductor 

—Season 1898-9- 

Witherspoon Hall, Juniper and Walnut Sts 



Season Tickets, $+.oo. 4 Package Tickets, $/., 
Single Admission, 35 Cents 

Thursday, February 2, 1899. 




IflfffiSICABS? 1 

Conductor Stoll Slights 
Our Composers, 

HOW LONG WILL IT LAST? 



Good Work of the 
Yesterday. 



The Geimania Orchestra and Ameri- 
can Compositions are evidently not 
well acquainted, so seldom Is it that 
we hear this orchestra attempt one. 

All through the season The Item has 
steadily pointed out to William Stoll, 
Jr.. that his duty as an American, 
and a conductor of 
chestra. was to see to It that 
composers were encouraged. 

Possibly Mr. Stoll considers 
Is doing his whole duty towards 
composers If he present 
5 in five weeks. 

He krows, or ought to know, tha 
we have on this side of the Atlanti 
many hard-working individuals o 
talent, whose compositions will bea 
acceptable to musi 



What encouragement is he glvinf 
these men? 

I am told that our composers have i( 
send their manuscript to Germany t< 
be published, because there is no grea 
demand for it here. 

How creditable this is to our musi 



Better things were hoped < 
n-.anla Orchestra when tt 
opened. Excuses of last yea 
to cne side, and there are m 



Mr. Stoll's 
yesterday was as follows: 
Rhapsodic NorTigienne No. 3... 
Piano Concerto op. 37 C minor. 



Symphony op. S8 No. 1 B flat Schumi 

Andante allegro molto Tirace. 

Larghetto. 

fiherco molto Tiyace. _J 

Allegro anlmato e gniclowtf 
The work of the orchestra was 
to its usual standard. There we 
however, a number of passages in 1 



I thought, too slow; 
upendous 
generally well inter- 



the tempo dragged. 



Mr. Zeckwer < 

season, but when he is anonunced we 
can alwayB look for a treat. 

His rendition of the Concerto showed 
that, while he infrequently appears In 
concert, he is able to hold his own 
with our leading Philadelphia pianists. 

It was a scholarly inter.Ji-t=tat:oii uf 



xcellent. the stati 
lg so well played that It lent a tone 
a the whol* composition. 
On the programme announced for 
ext week I find that our composers 

. [g-hted. 
When may wo expect to hear from 
bem, Mr. Stoll? 

J. W. LAWKS. 



"DAMROSCH, THE 
IDEA, HORRIBLE!" 

Views of Musicians Who Do Not Believe 

in an Orchestra Under His 

Leadership. 

PROF. THUNDER HAS MANY FRIENDS 



YV. H. 



Robinson anil 






are raising a guarantee fund of $100.- 

jr the establishing of a permaraent 
symphony orchestra in this city, are to 

aited upon by a committee of Phila- 
delphia musicians, and a protest is to be 

ed against the plan outlined by Mrs. 
Robinson in "The . Bulletin." There are 
lerous players here who believe that 
retaining of the New York Symphony 
Orchestra -*$H#(tare!gDM**J#rne tiew organi- 
sation will bo a treat injustice to local 
musicians. They prophesy that disaster 
,vill attend such a course; that the $100,000 
sill be wasted in a single season, and the 
hope of securing a permanent orchestra 



city 



gonization bearing the name of the Phil- 
adelphia Orchestra, which has fought Its 
way against great odds and given thirty 
concerts In Musical Fund Hall. It is com- 
posed "of forty-live members, under the 
direction of Professor Thunder, and its 
wor at times Is highly spoken of. It is the 
i of this leader that he could, if 
given support which would just! 

, ,, ; ,■ i,u -,l ola. .■ s hi' h:-l) 
n, and giving sufficient time to 
rsals, produce results equal to the 
best work of orchestras which have at- 
tained world-wide fame. In th 
he has the support of many professional 
here, who point to the fact that 
the Boston Symphony Orchestra was 
started in precisely this way. _ 

king to a reporter of "The Bul- 
letin" regarding the project for a new 

. , , ;■,,,, .--... 

"I have no objection to brining in play- 
ers from outside, but I think the founda- 
tion of the organization should come from 
local musicians and then be built up as 
found necessary. Instead, it seems that 
the ladles interested intend to bring in a 
body of outside pla 



but they won't play 
have seldom been " 

it. but as t 

■ let B Iirii- :> 



in tbe^ 



orchestra work. 
t are "players of 

give their ser- 
i of music, they 



reputation If support would be given t 
orchestra that would enable It to sin 
what It can do. I do not wish to be cc 
s'.dered selfish in the affair, but If 
strongly that if these ladies raise $100. 
and it is wasted, that it will be a hopeh 
to c k to ever attempt any further orch 
tra work in this city. If the people of this 
citv do not support their talented musi 
an they hope to retain them 
- of dollars in advanc 
ing orchestra work here. Se 



could name, and 
there see 



hard tha 



uodq loa ssu BSBitoA ijMyo AJii. 

3 is(Aarj H v 'lu-euai 
lUHU^inaii lenaujBg 



MUSICAL STRIFE 
ENDED BY TACT 

Mrs. Robinson's Resolution Makes 
Smooth the Way for a- Per- 
manent Symphony 
Orchestra. 

DAMROSCH LIKELY TO LEAD 



By means of splendid tact, comple 
harmony was to-day restored between tt 

Philadelphia, which ■ w 



9 

TIMES. 



\- DAMROSCH ATTACKED 

BY ANTICIPATION 



Discrediting Ills Ability 
. efforts are bolng-mado by n 



have been divided 
posed establishment of 
chestra here backed by i 



in.; 



A large meeting of representative wo- ! w 
men of the city was held at the residence I j, 
of Mrs. W. H. H. Robinson this noon. A 
committee was present to speak in behalf 
of those musicians who oppose the plan * 
first suggested of securing the services of ' n 
the New York Symphony Orchestra as a | if 
nucleus for the new organization, and re- i 
tainlng the services of Mr. Damrosch as ' a 
conductor. The contention has been that i 
local players should have first chance. 

As areault of to-day's conference it is I h' 
apparent that Mr. Damrosch is to be se- I ti 
cured as leader, but that he is to be in- 
structed to secure his first players from f ' 
gage outsiders or i A 



I This is provided for by a resolution of- 
fered at the meeting by Mrs 
. and unanimously carried. It was worded 

ias follows: 
"Resolved. That the orchestra be com- 
posed of men selected on their individual 
merits chosen first from Phil., 



en at home who have good local avenues 
l.-a.-hhig ,,r of other playing. The od1>- re- j 
affording superior 



rohestral material. 



I litis was regarded by all present as an 
admirable solution of the problem. No 
| mention is made of director, but it was 
i generally understood that by giving play- 

1 1 , 1 1 „■ 
I ship, no objection would be made to Mr 
ch, who is favored by a majority 
of the women interested. 
Mrs. Hecksher, Spencer Brock, Mr. 
] Knepp and Mr. Von Westernhagen were 
the representatives of the anti-Damrosch 
(interests and they concurred h 
i the frequently expressed opinion that 
i there must be no further friction. Next 
' this committee will again con- 
special committee ;.iinoini>vl 
to-anv, consisting of Mrs. Georgo \Y. . . 
■" '■■ " ' ■ I H. ibi son, Mrs. W. 
L. McLean. Mrs. E. I. Keffer, Mrs. Wil- 
li., m Riirnham and Miss Hutchinson, .t ■ 
"is all details of agreemoni v 'I 
apleted. 



by a false prestige. 



on. Most of these men caun 


• t afT.ol 


.y in our present nnraiiiziitlon 




r living through outside work 




iView of the orchestra] force 




ty shows the possibility of ob 




forty men as a nucleus, who 




ctor of conspicuous ability, e 










. Merit. 


nerit alone, ought to be the 


basis of 


lership iu the new orchestra 




delphla be first searched— af 


er that. 



'BUJtrajS -C 



aiqw ojicui 
oi astuiojd pun ' i^cja.vtj am oi dn uaAi 
oje asinao juosoJii *i|l jo; paddjqs osotix 
•lia.tt SE UODEJJI'ISUO.) 0)U| Aoq aql JO ,,qir 
joWDaui *!{\l\ oi ja.uod AH 
8At)U sjaouib ei|l pun '^uo ;j|is Aii-ud i >i 

■ejr.idie.ru iqi -I v 

■,«M Atu»uj -Apanis -oug u eae s.ioq *m ; 

oinJ i? so lmi .it' s-wDujo jsh "ii i ..j|ii 

Vw U| 9,™,,,' i oJj^OUSii lO-t-LUiiS ! 

jooqo 




who had acted 
olution. which 
"that in behalf 



Mrs. C. C. Harrison. Mrs. Charles M 
to nSmith, Mrs. G. W. C. Droxel. Mrs. 
,. , W. Patton. Miss Bright. Miss Ethel P 
* I rlsh, Mrs. C. C. English " 
•* , l.,.„n M 




Series of 20 Symphony Concerts 

AT 

WITHERSP0ON HI^LL^ 



...BY THE... 



GERMANIA ORCHESTRA 

WM. STOLL Jr., Conductor, 
^D WIN A. BRILL, Ass 't. Conductor. 

Programme for Thursday, February 2, 1899. 



1. Rhapsodic Norvigiennc No. 3 

2. Piano Concerto op. 37 C. minor L 

Allegro con t>rio 
Largo 
Rondo - 

Mr. Richard Zeckwer, So'oist. 

8. Symphon op. 38 No. 1 B flat S 

Andante allegro molto vivace 
Larghetto 

Shcrco molto vivace 
Allegro animato e grucioso 

Tho Steinway Piano used from Stetson & Co. 1209 Chestntit St. 



. A ?yrf the selections named on these Programmes, and everything 
in the line of Sheet Music and Books can be had of W.H. Boner & Co, 
13 14 Chestnut Street. 



1863^ 



«rl898 



... A 35 Years' Reputation ... 

FOR THE 

Highest Standard of Excellence 

HENRY R MILLER 
PIANOFORTES 

Used by more Musicians of Philadelphia in their 
Homes and Studios than any other Piano 



From Mr. CARL GAERTNER, 
The Eminent Violini.it and Conductor. 

HENRY F. MILLER & SONS PIANO COMPANY. 

Gentlemen — You wish me to give my' judgement as to 
the Henry F. Miller Pianos, and I am happy to do so. 

I have had the option to make use of the best in this 
country and have always given the preference to the Henry 
F. Miller in my conservatory and all entertainments, and 
found them alwavs satisfactory. Yours truly, 

CARE GAERTNER. 



PIANOS of Different Makes at the . . . 

MILLER PIANO WAREROOMS 

1123 Chestnut Street 



Comment of Dr. Hugh A. Ckrke upon the Music of 
the Programme of February 2, 1897. 



Rhapsodie Norvigienne 



^vendsen 



The ! hapsody has hecome one of the recognized forms— if form it may 
be called— of music. As its name implies, ii is a composition that does not 
pretend to any regularity in its construction, but is merely ; loose aggrega- 
tion of various themes, changing rapidly ar ft suddenly from grave to gay, 
according to the mood of the composer. National melodies, or imitation of 
them, are favorite themes for the Rha jsodist. The first part of this 
Rhapsody is made from a waltz-like theme, which, after a short introduc- 
tion, is first giv.'n by the oboe. This waltz movement is followed by a slow 
movement, the theme of which is givtn by n horn solo. This melody lias all 
the marks of an old Northern folk song. The last theme is evidently a 
dance theme, bright and lively. Its brisk notion is arreste ! shortly before 
the close by a slow r theme. A ter this the rapid dance theme is resumed 
w'th increasing speed to the en 1. 



Concerto 



BEETOOVEN 



It is a great misfortune to the music lovers that the oppoi :unity of hear- 
ing the great concerts o:' Beethoven, so se'.dom comes. Be dhoven never 
wrote from the standpoint of the virtuoso: music to him wa; of too mmh 
importance to be degraded with mer.e lisplav. Therefore gr;at as are the 
demands these compositions make on the technical ability of the artist, they 
make so much more on his musicianship that the mere "pianist' prefers 
something that will make more show for his expenditure of effort. 

Nothing can exceed the dignity of the opening theme, founded on the 
chord o " C minor. As though he wished to remove the second movement as 
'ar as possi le from the first in character, he has chosen the distant key of K 
major fcr it. The melody on which this movement is 'bunded is of singular 
lieantv, ornamented and arahesquecl with every dainty device at his com- 
mand. One part of this melody most have been haunting G> unod when he 
wr .to the beautiful aria that Faust sings when he first sees Margaret "Salve 



dimora e 'asta e pura, The last movement is a brilliant rondo constructed 
upon three themes. The rush and jubilation of this movement ig wonderful 
At one place the orchestra rushes into a fugue as though every instrument 
were impatient to take part in the theme. In the coda, as if the rush were 
not yet great enough, the time is changed to 6-8, and piano and orchestra 
seem to stumble breathlessly in their attempts to utter the theme in its new 
form, the whole ending with a triumphant burst in C major. 



Syiiiphony-B flat 



SCHUMANN 



There can be no doubt that Schumann's symphonies rank next to Beeth- 
oven's in force and terseness. They present the same evidences of their 
uuthorbaving something to say, and of his knowing bow to say it, strongly 
and directly. Although long, there is an entire absence of difl'useness. 
This symphony possesses, in an eminent degree, that prime requisite of all 
great music, noble themes: it is unfortunately impossible to describe in lan- 
guage the difference between the themes that make one noble and the other 
trivial, but to ihe musical instinct the difference is one that is always patent. 
The undisputed fact that this nobility o r theme, an air. or melody is never 
found, hut with the greatest composers, is. one would think, a sufficient 
argument against the prevailing modern belief, that national or folksongs bo 
they never so noo I, are the proper materials out of which to build great 
works of art. Music to I e great must be the expression of ideas of the com 
poser, not a working up of material ready made. 

The opening phrase of the introduction gives what may lie called, the 
text, the musical thought ol which the first movement is the outgrowth. 
This is followed by a broken scale of several measures, ending on the 
chord of F. Then the theme is repeated fortissimo, in the key of E flat, with 
an indiscribahle effect, produced by this simple means, as far as the entrance 
of the second theme, there is not a phrase that is not a fragment or a sugges- 
tion, of the theme or of its appended scale passage. 

Tin; second theme is given by the wood wind, Another phrase, slightly 
altered, api ears again in the finale, where it is used with wonderful effect. 
The movement ends with a coda of SUch length and importance that it al- 
most claims a set era to individuality for its.d'', although its chief motive is 
derived from the first theme. The slow movement is in lyric form. The 
middle division of this movement is mainly given to the wood wind with a 
delicate, tremulous accompaniment by the strings. The first theme is then 



repeated with a very elaborate accompaniment Tho«!,i. 

wntten in the classic minute form, i. provided wit f tw ^^ "^ ,s 

Brsttno the time is changed to cwo bits i. the TaUr *"* ** ^ 

ine themes which are too numerous to auof-fi i, a „ ' t 
ally the first" that recall, without reserXn!' i T^ * traits " es P"- 
oasses without stops into the finale ThZ Beeth °™» The Scherzo 

«*. in the aj l0P ^^; s not ^r m rL s : :rr 'i;: the ^ 

porary solution ot continuitv » %Y ^ alw ^ s *« the effect of a tem- 

spiwt 0f which is thTatii gs iL;r:;; a vertiwe st °™ ■* -»*. *• 

H. A. CLARKE. 



Advertising space in this Proqramme 

address F. Max Gress, Advertisin 

Germania Orchestra, Wit 



rfhCHAS. F. ALBERT, Manufacturer and Dealer in 
* VIOLINS, BOWS, GUITARS, MANDOLINS, BANJOS, etc., also, Cases and 
5y Strings for all instruments. 

Sole agent for MARTIN Guitars and Mandolins. 

Send for Circulars and Price'ist to 
'\ IfIS South Ninth Street, . OOC 

• lv*J Below Walnut. -' *U3 



f 



PHILADELPHIA MUSICAl ACADEMY 

J6J7 Spruce St. Philadelphi a, 60 29 Main St., Germantown. 
THE OLDEST SUCCESSFUL SCHOOL OF MUSIC. 

30th SEASON. TERMS, 7.50,$30. 

PRIVATE AND CLASS LESSONS IN ALL BRANCHES OF MUSIC 

1139 PUPILS IN ATTENDANCE LAST SEASON. 

- ' INSTRUCTORS: 

PIANO R. Zeckwer, M. Leefson, C. Samans, L> Howe, R. Hennig, 

F. Cresson, W. Leps, Camille Zeckwer, Misses Sower, vSutor, 
Tiers Davis, Henderson, Hall, Walker, Price; Mrs. W. and J. 
- 'Tiers, ACOUSTICS— R. Zeckwer. 

JANKO- PIANO— L- Howe. SIGHT SINGING— John Zobanaky. 

ORGAN— David Wood, F. Cresson, L. Howe. 

VIOLIN— G. Hille, Howard Rattay. 

VIOLINCELLO-R. Hennig, L. Trein. 

VOCAL— Carl Schachner, Miss M. Bnedinger. 

THEORY R. Zeckwer, F. Cresson, C. Zeckwer. 

t „..l„ ', onri.PHnils' Concerts -n our own Hall. Hook & Hastinci= Church Organ, blown 

by electric motor For Ill-i-trated Circularsapply to RICH. ZECKWER. Director- 




He Gives H-- 

Over the Select Ion 
Toth e Editor 0< THE T.MES.^ ^ ^ 

1 J ,i wblcb appe» ro(1 
r int my answer to the coniine 

' .' "nT'srounrt whatever for the re- 



,.,-, n .,.spoadL-iu-i- with mem- 
,-otnu.lttee. Not once was 
eader denied. On the cou- 
v,v- Insisted upon ;ls ^ 
■ment. The fact that the 
ntl of special on-hcsu-a was. 
iwi-illv bT the commit- 
tot Important to p«bll.b 
on- it gives no ground to! 



II art. A l - - - ?lu -oessor 

.fat < luctors UKu, a . ___ _ f 

moned from New ^ork for 

ihn , n , s im:inir s">Meues. 



n SJ ,|„. .,f tit- 

""'f ''il'at'wh'™ a U friend of mine, at 
i'u^' '-'happ.-nin ,-t ocnll upon the^o m- { 
• M ;"r the' Hit. 'r 'could not refrain his 
flshme'nt that . »^,VS*.». 
, T iui«n;u5iiiOi»' . M frjin ,, 1>f .. 
mu ' r V," S is t'o'dcnvi.^ thai this lie 
^ to cur own musicians has „• ' 
t4,°«s dl Vhat?UnowV^af^ 
' -slola'Jts is that they 



" iv, ", sl ''i''',t 

,-almlv dumb and mat 

U V' lr r"i'-u , 'thi" local composers 



.{fort to assert 
jeal- 



Mr." 1- 








IjlO.-t IC 


1'''"-' '' 


it you 


i',r..'."c. 


"to for persot 



HL.1P H. GOEP 



. 



$100,000 AT HAND 
FOB AN ORCHESTRA 

Plans Matured for a Permanent 

Symphony Society of the 

First Rank in This 

City. 

MRS. GILbtSPIE'S OPPOSITION 



Eacked by a guarantee fund of at teast 
$100,000, a symphony orchestra second 
none in this country, is to be established 
In r'hiludelphia. A*ive%r breeze has begun 
to agitate musical circles regarding the 
best method of carrying out the project, 
the conductor to be chosen and the mu- 
sicians to be secured. Two ladies have ad- 
vanced plans, and while there is some 
little friction apparent at present, the 
prospects favor a united movement for 
the carrying out of the praiseworthy ob- 
ject desired by both. 

Mrs. W. H. H. Robinson is working 
among the wealthy musical people of the 
city to secure the money with which to 
endow the orchestra and is meeting with 
such success that she believes the entire 
sum will be pledged within a few days. 
It is hoped to raise more than $100,000, 
although that sum will probably be suf- 
ficient for all needs. Mrs. Robinson is 
well known for her generous gifts in sup- 
port of musical enterprises here. Regard 
ing the pla 
she said t< 
Bulletin:" 

"There is only one new feature in re- 
gard to a symphony orchestra for Phila- 



such an orchestra, from the 
viewpoint of enj« . 
alike. How it will be appreciated 

ance of the Boston organization f "^ 

"Philadelphia i 
second to none. Early 
was a meeting called 1 

■■'■"- 
on, and the women interested in the planj j 
threw it aside, temporarily, feeling^ ;" 

raised for the purpose 
fence. Philadelphia v 
but they are always 
first efforts for 1" 

"After hostilities ceased, 
elded to wait until after the holidays 

going ahead with the plans for 1 
orchestra. Now, however, the time r 
come when be decided 

and that it will be decided in favor oi 
that will bt 
a source of pride to the city, I feel cer- 

"lunderstand that I have been criticised 
by some persons for my efforts; that m; 
belief in Mr. Walter Damrosch has beei| 
construed to mean that I am end 
ing to work solely in his interests ar 
insist that if an orchestra is formed. 
he shall be at its head; and I have 
greatly surprised f 

■, . i . ■ 1 : i 

favor of outsiders. 
"In regard to sucl 
I can simply say t 
cure the aid of music 
form an orchestra 
the city and of us 



people hope to make 
chestra. On 

called upon to make good 
tain deficits, and if they do tr 
terest of art, I can see no 
their selecting a leader, and 

It is said by some that the Places 

si--a is in this city eni.il' ' R '~ 
m such an orchestra. I\r- 

- 
nt-H v is exag2rer.il. 'd. \t -"''enjv- 
plans call for an orche h ^ need 



Emm 



THE ORCHESTRA AFFAIR 

Clear View Clearly Presented hy 
Musician of Authority. 

the Editor of The TiiMEs: 



The piil-J 
ilr appeal 



gett 



tbeir i 



(I tiu 



beyc 



pleasure they 
general good It Is intended to do. 

Some professional musicians charge these 
individuals with arrogance for trying to 

dlvlduals are amateurs: tb'ls arrogance, 
; not nearly as great as that: 
id professionals 



the : 



, shall i 



Th- Ml-Ii 



which the professionals use as a 1 > li t r 1 < - - ■ ■ i ~ 
cannot screen the personal character of their/ 
arguments. It is a fight of fear; the coming 
of some better man, whoever he may be. is 
what they fear; not all who do the hglitin.-. 
but most of them; the others are under thein 
influence. 

Now, Colonel Higginson, of Boston is noti 
a professional musician: still, acting entirely 
upon his own ideas he gave to the people of 
this country the very best orchestra so fac 
heard here. 

King Ludwig II. of Bav 






pre 



Wag- 



ner to the world, t 
an amateur, which is merely a Frei 
for the lover of a thing. It was t 
with Prince Esteihazy and Haydn 
Lirhu-nsteiu and Waldstein and B 
and many other cases. 



made the orchestra start here 
are amateurs only in the sense that their 
finances permit them to refrain from pro- 
fessional executive work: as to their talent. 
i of artistio 
sensibility. They are the 

professionals, and far superior 




flfianusctipt Mimic 
Society 

of IPbtlabelpbia 



BuBLIC 



f§J0NCERT 



WEDNESDAY EVENING 

FEBRUARY EIGHTH.* 

J 899 



GRIFFITH HALL 

CROZER BUILDING 
1420 CHESTNUT STREET 



■, — - — • cm* 

llfijZl&t/ MAN USCRIPT MUSIC SOCIETY 



Concert. 



•m YV. G 1 1 eh rls t en n I r'l hu led' a ,'r'. o / 
id strings, a scholar!-,- ,.-,,,',, ,,»,.. 
as admirably played hy j|'r 
I'.'il' J J'„- Ru,l "lPh iiennlg r 
Ichard Zeckwer, Mr. Nicholas 
ntrlbuted thro,. 5 



■h ho sang 



Mil 



...is.s Zadle Townsenrf th . 

,: " ■ ,r ,,; ■■ '•-■■ hi ■ ii io J.T; I 

hich she unites with an .n,!^,-,^ m ' '•','' 

■ntH b r uted s ?r;t y y p^r » G °r 

J'-vcrTT com P°=ltlon. "Chlld's^ancv" 

•arm Easter* ears Mr Saritm 
ayed an andante by Henry A L,„ e ^n! 
...rufolS. ™ b ™£tt^ T" ' sp- 
rings by CamlUe w^ckwe? wh"" 
Tr.ro? °, Pen ' ne some Wh 
«y Passes o?^.?!^".?? 10 '** 
•mpatheticany.nte^r^ed^br^r.^StT 
t *L%; SCtokIt ' Mr ' «•»-.« ana 



MANUSCRIPT MUSIC SOCIETY 

:t Gives an Enjoyable Public Con- 
cert at Griffith Hall 

Thar v.ilunblf and public-spirited organ- 
zatloil, the Manes, ript Mi;.- i.- s, „■;,.,,- ,-,; 

1,11 ' i"lp!na. -a v.- its Last open n,ii,vr| 
"■■ "i" --asi.il at liriC.ith Hall lasl ,-(,-,-,„- 
" II..' presence of a relatively large com 



Tla- 






vely 



mil variety and Interest. It Include 
io for piano and strings by W. W. 
lrlst, which has become fnmlliar, 

,l '"'' n is al-.va.. - ., ,., .-. 

"iillli- W. Zeekwer's verr ■ 
renuous quintet for piano' 
.. a: violin solos by Oust: 



strong ami 
and stdffes. 

v Will ,,,. 



l.y Celeste 
' e r. c ™ne «. Swift. David : 
1 Nicholas Dunty. 

well for the menjbershi'ri 



K. ,k- 



■ ■ ... i ■ 



(lie 



any length upon 



adequate, gen, .rally el ,,.., „i a n,l ii.,i 
an.. inly of a hieii ,.:,ler of la.,,. 

I'-'.-I hilly aotal.I,- .v.. re tl- :,„-, 

Nicholas Dourv whoso selections • 
Month of May ••"•■' 
id "0 Death Thou A 
Toautifill in l!)eai,,.|v, 
nil"!,, I hy ihe compose 
of the closing quint 




Its First Chamber Concert In (.rlflllh j 
Hall-Many Uonittllul Works. 
'I'h" programme presented by the Mnnu- 
-S.TlpI Mi, I,- Society al lea II, i 
'■"'"■'• rl I" ' Irlnlll, Mall »., 

fl'olll Compositions KM, 

"f noveily. „;,. ami a,, 

production of works long out of th, 

script form would of i, ; -,.|f l„. „„ 

•■dement of ui-al.ricss. and 

vcys that Impression to all mve 

miliar with the fad thai there are , 

other and more recent seres available 

the program committee's approval .„ 

as it can free Itself from the mist. 
policy of programming moolc onl 
l ,lim '- rl "' "ompospr. For tills i . .. 

!'".'r' n 'w,',l"u'iH | l i'la "^'"'"r " fr """ 1 
i'"'"'. 1'' Henry A 1 . I . 

['.',", .' """■ ■ ',".' |,l: ' ■ : . '■":! '■' " 



an," of the program. nslsleil of „ 

'•■- and siring, I,-.- w. \v. 
• It. Hecks, -her c;. 

violin s 




The ,■:■:•• nl: 
Nicholas 

Jr.. Edwli 

ilolph Ilennlg, Itlcliard Zeckwer. c'amille 
Philip H. c.,.,^,^ , 
II.-,- 



Zadle W. Town-end j 

■Hats; William g 

Iticliard Schmidt. 




c Sooietv 



The Manuscript Music looiety Concert. 

The concert .of the Manuscript Mus" 
Soclety in Griffith Hall. Crozer Build n 
last evening, was well «°r' h »" 
beginning, as It did. with Mr 
Gilchrist's workmanlike and b< 
...,- i-.,- r-.i.™ nn,l strings, and 



edded 
■holorly 

Gilehri 



with a fa..., 
die the balance 



the allegro. maJesBi 



read by Mr Stoll. i 

and Mr- I""."-. 
String Ui 



1 rtUin ii 

corny-" 1 



I 



:'. -'I", 

3 



,:%-Z*>.2c-. Siiosj^t Jsc.'l.ti;-. ,£';:!<> £. 



1 



I mrTgoewotmche^orchestra 



His Version of tUe Trouble 
he Selection of a Leader. | 

r of THE Times: 

r. to the slsnera of ttie letiei 

,bouy on-lir-smi. tvhi.-ii :i|'pe;ii-o.l 



r.'r r,: n^" l -ii- 


ncrs of the le 
1 oorrespouileu 


,. wllu i 


pp of (lie otb 


lender denied. 


On the 


tr'irv i: v.'"* 


Iwnys Insisted 


upon a 



publish | ■ 

jund for | « 



denial of th 
old trouble. 



,r this is really an ! 
jng been a fashion 
> decry everything 

, one of 



■__ 

- ; rhiladelphian in ■».-• 

» in -ill art. A few years 

1 ,.,.r "rent coniluclors died, a successor 

necl from New York f"r tw0 of ou 
l''i U '' " " ," "oueoTtheablls 

• fart that. wo f .[ 1 fJ, u ""ouductoiv" of Amend 
and »"■' •'.",.,,,„ a c-ieiel ol 111111-. a 
1 e-m-'uu" 1 ■ . . u .--all upon tlie ( " n 
that lime hai'i'' "ii - .^ yT[ . s , ( „ k „ 

i 1 '" >or ne'r the latt'-r "could not refrain h 
" ! •" lu,nishI1 .' e "L t o« I in 'favor of' an exi-eliou 



:'n,VianLiy^ ( m.e's!''h"tIknow-of^ 
^S^'.lm.i'i. Si"? "make no effort to a, 



,f " Philadelphia's 



■i.' 



-Mr. Editor, on this point 
no compromise. °} u ' , e !ji" 

,,s much as possible, in thi. 
if you please, t\ar— traiia. 



le: them be into lie d. 

hai" a perteo, r. hi " 
If , hey please. * h ^. rt of 

„VpnbfiVp.iib'y' : ''l;M''s. 



ia-te. ; .f jud^ucntj. 



$100,000 ATliAND 
FOR AN ORCHESTRA 

Plans Matured for a Permanent 

Symphony Society of the 

FirstRankinThis 

City. 

MRS. GILLESPIE'S OPPOSITION 



Eacked by a guarantee fund of at least 
$100,000, a symphony orchestra second to 
none in this country, is to be established 
in Philadelphia. AAivefc^ breeze has begun 
to agitate musical circles regarding the 
best method of carrying out the project, 
the conductor to be chosen and the mu- 
sicians to be secured. Two ladies have ad- 
vanced plans, and while there Is some 
little friction apparent at present, the 
prospects favor a united movement for 
the carrying out of the praiseworthy ob- 
ject desired by both. 

Mrs. W. H. H. Robinson is working 
among the wealthy musical people of i 
city to secure the money with which 
endow the orchestra and is meeting w 
such success that she believes the entire 
sum will be pledged within a few days. 
It is hoped to raise more than §100,000, 
although that sum will probably be suf- 
ficient for all needs. Mrs. Robinson is 
well known for her generous gifts in sup- 
port of musical enterprises here. Regard- 
ing the plans for a permanr-" - 

Bulletin:" 

"There is only one new feature 
gard to a symphony orchestra for 
delphia, and that is that at last it 

being established. For years 
d for years 



reporter of "The 



city have regretted 



J*M$ 



musical people • 



.!-.■■ ,.,.,;, 

ch greet the api 
Boston organization each sea 

have an organization / 

■of to 3 c 
needed to 
cessary musicians. Then the 
i, and the women interested i 
rew it aside, temporarily, feeling thatj 
money was raised then, it should * 
ised for the purpose of national t 



efforts for 
"After hostilities 
cided to wait until after the holidays 
fore going ahead with the plans for 



' 



decided 
It will be decided in favor ol 
establishing an organization that will 



"I understand that I have been i 
by some persons for my efforts; that m; 
belief in Mr. Walter Damrosch has been 
construed to mean that I am endeave^J 
ing to work solely in his 

J j i s i ==. : uulL if in ■ frll^im ,,. I'nrmea, that 
he shall be at its head; and I have 
greatly surprised to see 3 



favor of outside: 
"In regard to su 
I can simply say 



founded : 
I am trying 
aid of music lovers simply 
that will 1 



the city and of use to all musician; 
As yet there has been absolutely 
anjong " 



elded by the will of those who give movf 
In support of the orchestra. None of t^ 6 
people hope 

i ui on to make good large 

r iin .kin its, and if thev do this V 
t-Test .-.f art. I can see no oh/ 
their selecting a leader, and d 
derstand criticisms in this iv fo rrv 
" T * «- said by some that the Places 
"■ "trLT 



THE ORCHESTRA AFFAIR 



Clear 



rbnrire these 



Clearly Presented by a 
Musician of Authority. 

To the Editor of The Times: 

The public discussion of the orchestra af- 
fair appears somewhat strange to me. inas- 

funds are concerned In it. A number of in- 

and take The. risk of ] using their money or 
setting it hark, without claiming any Inter- 
est on their investment (I trust) beyond 
the pleasure they derive from it and the 
general good it Is intended to do. 

StiuK- proiVssi«iQa] musician 
individuals with arrogance 
establish the orchestra, because these in- 
dividuals are amateurs; th'ls arruganee, 

of the aforesaid professionals trying to 
dictate what the mush- lovers shall do with 
their money. The high sounding word a 
which the professionals use as a battle-cry 
ear not screen the personal character of theirJ 
arguments. It is a hght of fear; the coining 
of some better man, whoever he may be, id 
what they fear; not all who do the lighting, 
but most of them; the others are under then; 

Now, Colonel Higginson, of Boston is not] 
a professional musicla;i; still, acting entirely 
upon bis own ideas he gave to the people of 
this country the very best orchestra so fac 

King Ludwig II. of Bavaria, no matter 

how sad bis end was. practically g;i ve Was- 



for the lover 



elyj 



French term 



and 



and 



It must not be lost sight of that those 
amateurs who made the orchestra start here 
are amateurs only in the sense that their 
finances permit them to refrain from pro- 
fessional executive work: as to their talent, 
ability, knowledge and refinement of artistic 




, 





ed nothlnffbut oralae. / 




1. N.K.I. P.I 


■ r, Mi.ltl. Richte. 


imil U'. 1 ik-.jcrtner ha 


■i: br .11 '■llk-C ■■■'■ '1 


ilS P0»Klb 


o leaders, but tn my kunwl-dK-i 


1...1 1 t ,. in ' 


,,. ,-i,r 1- : < <\;t- -1. 




:,[<■ liKttiy Wl 


, h-ll-vi- Mr. Dnm- 


rnsch, UK 




. < -..ii-Iik-1 or of any 


of Hum. 


Km nil IhlK 


dlMCUMSloll tH IisI'Im 




t. All II 


;.| 1:; ln-lllR HOUffht 


l'.'1'l".. ,''... 


h of the city. 


I'hj .1. I|.hi.i 1M ■ ■!■! 




Ira. H wants llio licst In the 






(t lul.Mr- tin-- in-. j,. y 


ulil.li v'n 




l, .. r'-allty." 


Mr*. K. 


II i;ni,:,|,l. 


ti-:i«ls tint list Of 






■ ..•.HI llK'lilirii In 




V.Hll 111. |„. 


'■v.\ of Mr:;, Kohlu- 




Vli: . (JIM. -.-.j.ti. h:i» 






ssiK'il, wli'i. Ii niivs: 










••■ins in iiin.-.jii, rr .[ 








n,l .ii 




thai It would cost 


! ". .'' ' 


"{"horofw' 


iy of pli.y.T., uho 

Hi < tnploy ..pi.Tllv 
n have l'<h.iI lo.al 
Of olh.T 1*1:. > Hi,. 

Mi.ii.-ii.il'.'ln' In'i.'f. 
ior mi.! l.y u false 

llmt Philadelphia 


"II Is 








,.'.,. . ■ . 


■"/ ,"",','„;'!! 


M^,r^-,nMnt l! .',v''ni 


In „h,\- i, 






Imr l,. M.r 








i ''.'■')■ i "'•",',"! 


tl^'il.^Mhliny'llf 








nl.llliv, .\ 






would EOC 






nny orchestra. 




'■The lea 


Ii-r must h.> ..f Ihr. lilchcut uh'll- 








u'lwi lull- 










• ■i-il i. ■■■■iniii. 'lid i. 






i a man who 1ms 


'i'iYT' l",' '. 










in ".'.p'.-i.-i'Vlr.'wal- 


;?'51 


Wsi. 


iin ii liiivo i-ariu'd 


i.lhiTK. S 


.•!.'",n ..,''1,; 


hi. .'■ ...', ;,!■'. r,''!i. 


Til.' . -i'r 


'.|l!u'"u '■ i'-'i 


■l" ' l ''- l ,uXv- 'V.\h .f< 


... SIi 




..M.s <V1rsle d! 






* TUUs Clark. Mrs. 


K !•: Eae 


iy, fllfTor.l I 


owls and Thilo Von 


Westernhagen. 











Programme 



WILLIAM WALLACE GILCHRIST 

Grio for Piano anO Strings 

Allegro 

Adagio 

Scherzo : Vivace 

MR. WM. STOLL, Jr. MR. RUDOLPH HENNIG 

MR. RICHARD ZECOTER 



IDiolin Solos 



Songs 



CELESTE D. HECKSCHER 

Horse TLove Song 

GERTRUDE H. SWIFT 

"Ibarfe! iBarh! Gbe fcarfe!" 

DAVID E. CROZIER 

" 1Rose tbat wast JSorn in tbe dfcorning " 

MISS ZADIE TOWNSEND 



GUSTAV HILLE 

Oriental IRbapsods in a Minor 

MR. HILLE 

HENRY A. LANG 

anDante Sostenuto, from Sonata, op. 12 

MR. ED. BRILL 



NICHOLAS DOUTY Songs 

a " ttwas in tbe ILovelB iHiontb of /Bias " 
b " Zo iffi>e Sweetbeart" 
c "© ©eatb, Sbou art ttbe Dewg IWgbt" 

MR. DOUTY 



PHILIP H. GOEPP 



"CbtiO's ffancg" 

Andante Penseroso 
" TKaieDergutsetn" 

Andante con Espressione 

MR. GOEPP 



CAMILLE W. ZECKWER 

<a»intette for Ipiano an& Strings, op. 5 

Allegro Vivace 
Allegretto Quasi Andante 
Allegro Energico 
MR. STOLL MR. BRILL MR. SCHMIDT 



MR. HENNIG 



MR. ZECKWER 



i The New Compositions 
HeardJ^Night. 

A PLEASING CONCERT 

Contributions from Gilchrist, 
Douty, Zeckwer, Hilles. 



If the public 
script Society of this ci 
dlcation of the growth 
mind of Philadelphia, it 
advance the latest work: 



Griffith Ha 
g last year. 



Of the nine composers trom wnoiu 
we heard, few works, if any were 
played from the manuscript, and 
most of them have been heard before, 
some in public and some in privata 

For the presentation of the latter 
not much fault can be found, for the/ 
were given their first public test. .But 
of the former, well, unless our com- 
posers have become discouraged. It 
ought not to be necessary to repeat 
their works at these concerts. 

The object of the Manuscript So- 
ciety's public concert should be to 
present to the public the best of those 
works which have bt 
private evenings. If t 



i is not adhered 

i public hearing? 

n the other hand. It is desired t« 
present to the public the bestr 

! that have met with special suc- 

;ince the organization of the so- 
tii.-'n a special evening should 
apart for this purpose, and th« 



which, by reason of the failure of our 
local musical organizations to appro* 
ciate. are 'shelved" In Philadelphia 

T.nst nlEbXs concert was not a fai* 
iud'l T-|d|.-ipr!|!u>i jn""ojr u ,W, , ",^t whicH 
-3pnr punos am oi 11 3.«rai pun -em 
-U]e)qo iu.ss9.td ie 'sjouj 3trj \\-e tus 
-»•»'<! Ill* J«axi 3HX lie jb tto|uidi 
ssusnuui 01 SuitdiusiiB mou.li 4 
;.a.\n jib JSTioiue iwpiAip AUBnb,-, sq" is 



qna JO lUsuiutHlarr 
1BA\ lao<j jo pteog 



f simoid HHX 



NEW CENTURY DRAWING ROOM 

TUESDAY EVE'O, FEB. 25, 1599 



An Evening with the 

Song Writers 
. of Philadelphia ■ 



Mrs. Helen Boicc-Hunsickcr 

Soprano 



SHE SANG FOR COMPOSERS. 

ra. Bolct-H.iiisloker's Recital (or 

Local Authors. 
Mrs. Helen Roice-Hunsicker's recital, en- 
tied "An evening with the song-wrlters 
1'hlladelphla," wllfah was held Inst 
rening In the New Century Drawing 
•oom, was a most successful cntertaln- 
lent. The Idea of a song recital with 



hire/, e 

o he pr, 
-e,.i ,1.1 



i this elty 
local snng- 
n pieces of 






recital closed she hr 
n songs. "Me 
ie late Herman Mohr. 



script song, "Oh, Nancy" Wirt "Thou" Go 
With Me?" 

Richard Zeck'wer's manuscript song, 
"Wenn Ich In Delne Augen Seh," was 
-xeeedingly clever, and his "Thou Art 
Like Uuto a Flower" was received with 
songs, "On the 



Banks 



W> 



The ,.i It ;s for ehlMrer 

eelirse. was welcomed 
l.ut I.ucy W. Law's 
"Harden and rraille." > 

equally favorable h nl 

Queen." a manuscript i 






ler Fremde," Maur 
Stormy Sunday," i 
and "Retrospection 



A Descant," 
litk.n. shared 
ions of young 

e charmingly 
childlike aim- 

:ei Child." of 



"Friihlings 
; "At the 
;y Look lug 









a 



4£1.| 



Ml. 8 5; 



- 


C/TJ 


.2 • 


o 

z 

8 

O 


3 #- 

I.JS 




P^=j 




.*S 






£ T) ' < 














^ 


1-7 nJ 


a. 


a I 
5 Q 






SSS^ -»^«i»o=SS5Soo S"--l3o3>.' , | i.SSKtS*0-ofc§S J 2 9«'^ n'0:» <D p2B«a55£&B^ •§£>£" 



A.u lechei The late Herman Mo 



♦o Nancy Wilt l hou Go With Me ? 

Philip II. Goepp 



*Wcnn i( h In Delne Augen Seh' 
'I hou ;\ii Like unto a I lower 

Richard Zeckwer 

10, V\ ere Wy Love You Lilac Rare ! 

Massah M. Warner 

On 'i he Banks of Allan Water 
It. Was .1 Loyer and His Lass 

Camille W. Zeckwer 
The Rose ■ - Russell King Miller 

A Brook Song - Frederic Maxson 

My Sweet Heart) 
Forgetfulness S 

Wit Einem Gemalten Band) 
tWanderer's Nachtlied ) 

•Pruhllnqs Stiirme - - Marlinus van Gelder 



N'icholas Douty 



Rosa van Gelde 



PRO( ikVtW 

[At The Window 

[By Looking In Thy Eye 
tThou 



Harold II. Nason 



MarieKunUel Zin i 



; Lorelei ----- i M. /,, 
Sehnsucht - - lohn F, Hlmmel ba< h 

In cler Premde - Maurits I el ion 

L'pon Ane Stormy Sunday Francis T. S. Darley 

Retrospection - Prank G. Cauffman 

tA Descant - - - - Wm. W. Gilchrist 

Songs for Children : 

fairy and Child Wm. W. Gilchrist 

tGarden and Cradle Lucy w. Law 
*The Pairy Queen - - Philip H. Goepp 



* Manuscript 

t First Public Rendition (Ms.) 

t First Rendition (Ms ) 



459th CONCERT 

Ipbflabclpbia Musical Hcabem^ 

GIVEN BY PUPILS AT THEIR HALL 

1617 SPRUCE STREET 

THURSDAY EVENING, MARCH 16th 

AT EIGHT O'CLOCK 

programme 

PIANO— Sonate, Pathetique Betthoven 

Miss H. Young 

PIANO— Fantasie, C Minor Mozart 

Miss S. Gilbert 

VOCAL— («)" Ich Liebe Dich " Grieg 

(<Si"Du Bist WieEine Blume " Liszt 

(f)" Spring's Eyes" • • Rico 

Miss E. Pattee 

PIANO— Rondo, from Sonate op. 22 Beethoven 

Miss B. Knight 

PIANO— Rondo capricioso Mendelssohn 

Miss A. Sellers 

VOCAL— " Dreams " Wagner 

Miss I. Nachod 

PIANO— Sonate, f Major, 3d Movement Mozart 

Miss E. Nace 

PIANO -Nocturno, D Flat Chopin 

Miss N. Evans 

VOCAL— {a)-' Moonlight " Schumann 

(h)" Madrigal " Harris 

Miss M. Peale 

PIANO— (a) Gondellied Mendelssohn 

It) Valse Barcarolle Borowshy 

Miss L. Smith 

PIANO— (a) Bluette Schuett 

(i) Tarantelle Raff 

Miss E. Samans 

VOCAL— Nymphs and Fauns Bember ? 

Miss E. Hoppe 

PIANO— (a) Mazurka Chopin 

(b) Arabesque Chaminade 

Miss J. McBride 

VOCAL— Landgrave's Speech from Tannhauser .... Wagner 

Mr. A. Hinkley 

PIANO— (a) Chopin Godard 

(b) Pierette Chaminade 

Master C. Bawdeu 

The Steinway Grana has been furnished by N. Stetson, 1209 Chestnut Street 



./£". 



2nd Season 



1898-99 



¥ 



flfcusical ffunb 1ball 

locust St. above Eighth 

Twenty *■ 

Symphony Concerts 



HENRY GORDON THUNDER, Conductor 



Friday Afternoons, at 3.30 P. M., from November J 8 to March 3 J 



SEVENTEENTH CONCERT, MARCH 10th, 1899 

Soloist, CAM1LLE VV ZECKWER. 



Ml.. Z1XKWER 



(Violin Solo, MR. E. A. 
SUITE— "Boabdil" (by request) 



C. ZECKWER 



HAENDEL 
MOSZKOWSKI 



The STEINWAY Piano used 
Eight. 



. STETSON & CO., 121)0 Che- i 



lenth Concert, March 17th, I ROO - Soloist.M.iurit/ l.e, Is ,n Piano. Suite "Sal.jj 
liftman. Concerto. Rubinstein. Pastorale. Ajjicks. Symphony No. 2, Chaawick. 
inal Concert. March 51st. will he a Wagner Program. 



reful 



mm puis 



Piano Concerto Com- i 
psed by Himself. 

THf SYMPHONY CONCERT] L 

Wajfcrian Thunder to End thcH 
Thunder Seasoa 



he f/ure of the ftauna"* *** ** ^^ 

LJ- £ .test-.rW; j!'"'p'i r rf';" "in::^ 

£ ff* n'ot ^Vcts Clt JpT him 
■ /a a composer but as a vlrt,m«,. QB 
HlB. virtuoso an 

\lht Ir ; ZeCkWer ' 3 concerto-whlch b> 
hV pr " jr l0 yesterday had nevoi 

^been played In public-is ln the regula- 
o/tion three movements. The llrat an al- 
.-negro enersleo. is built up around a 
.,;,, short principal theme of much -har- 
. acter and strength. The piano pari Is 
j broadly worked out but la probably a 
long and too h, ■.-, 



In the" 



> giv 



a purely solo instrument the 
I CT" ,' -""- nt showed that its composer 
ie jJ had been keenly alive to the extent to 
which the- soloist might be permitted 
.n move by his keyboard. 

— - second movement-a* romanco. 
broad m feeling and treatment gave 
excellent chance for the display of the 
player's poetic feeling. Rather than 
pathetic or brooding i n nature the 
whole movement seemed rather to be 
contemplative and aspiring. The flnal 
movement was a brilliant tarantelle 
full of life and gaiety, and concluding 
with conventional freedom and force, 
■the work in its entirety seems bet- 
ter suited to the display of digital ex- 
pertness and sound technique than to 

ff^?!?? , nd " soul " Nevertheless. It 
it ,i cr-u:ia:,le p,e,,,, of- work 

Mr. Zeekwer played it most arlfstl- 
iave hfS' "? tempo, of course he 
I ■ i "iS. " hole attention to style and 
hnish. T h9 taraiuelle was especlally- 
charmmg. The audience-a much larg- 
JS, th <" : hav « even seen at any of 
certs-was In, lined to 

u,oming. C ° re nUmLe ''- hUl " Wa8n '' 



. The splendid 



lent 



proy/ramme 



del largo, put down 
to give It balance. 

S'X mo'v Th " b '' 0a<i 

<■•/ Mr Hull 



Soil 1 



-Sy siBia. 1 ^ 

is in hfs usual 



The conclu 

MnSai 

Scrat. h the 



nl..-r was He 



violins 
melody 

.concluding 'rum 

"Boobdil" suite. In which I , 
r seeks 1 , 1,,, moorish. 1 ', 
>ns ,u"°° r ' howev « r . « ' 
.v,x 1 week we are t j haw an almost 2.. 
ftrtlrely American p . 

dudes Caiirrm.ii.-s ■Salu.inibo" suite " , 
:■ Stanley Ma - 

Tli" IS. 
pt^M.'ctUs'V' 

do x ibu 1 iL be a mosl enJ0> ' ab,e co ' 

" t. the tinal concert is to he 

- ' "I !.. -. • 

apathy man.f.,M,.| lt ,:„.. |,,,,' purely" 
■ an, e 

" for .-W.„ er „„„„„ 

' I 



o 



J 






it 



iu 



19-KOTE CHANGE OF PLACE OF MEETING. 

Philadelphia Music Teachers' Association. 

The next meeting will be held on Tuesday Evening. April 4'", 1899, at 8 

o'clock, at the Philadelphia Musical Academy, 1617 Spruce St. 

PAPER:— Pitch. With Numerous Experiments. By Mr. Richard Zeckweb. 
MUSIC:— Mr. Wm. R. Stobbe and Mrs. Hoffman, Violin and Piano. 

Miss Helen L. Tract-wine, Soprano. 
DUES:— All members having failed to remit the current dues after April 15th, 
will receive a " third Notice of Dues." Mr. Theodore Prf.sser, 170S Chestnut St., 
will receive dues and issue Membership-Season Tickets. 

William Wolsieffer, Secretary- Treasurer, 

1313 Master Street. 
N. B —Members are requested to notify the Secretary of Change of Address. 



vfcianolRecital 

^ MBSUDE FISCHER CORB.N 

Mr . Richard Zeckwer, Pianist 

Miss A . R.Keeley, Soprano 

M,. Julius Falk, Violinist 

HJ.H. Edith Au g hinbau g h, Accompanist 



^emple^ eatte 



4th and 5th 



Market St., between 

CAMDEN, N. J- 
On Thursday Evening, April Sixth 



Cards of Admission, F ifty Cents 
MIS S MARY McKEEN, Manner 






liirri (t 



,■'■■. 



H« 



8STNOTE CHANGE OF PLACE OF MEETING. 

Philadelphia Music Teachers' Association. 



The next meeting will be held on Tuesday Evening, April 4th, 1S99. at 8 
o'clock, at the Philadelphia Musical Academy, 1617 Spruce St. 

PAPER:— Pilch. With Numerous Experiments. By Mr. RICHARD ZECKWER. 
MUSH':— Mr. Wm. R. Stobbe and Mrs. Hoffman, Violin and Piano. 

Miss Helen L. Trautwine, Soprano. 
DUES:— All members having failed to remit the current dues after April 15th, 
will receive a " third Notice of Dues." Mr. Theodore Presser, 1708 Chestnut St., 
will receive dues and issue Membership-Season Tickets. 

William Wolsieffer, Secretary-Treasurer, 

1313 Master Street. 
iu B.-Members are requested to notify the Secretary of Change of Address. 



PROOnflPIWE 



i. a. Sonata, op. 7, (First movement) Grieg 

/,. Autumn Chaminade 

c. Encourant, Godard 

2. SOPRANO SOLO, " Nymphs and Fawns," .- . . . Bemberg 

3. a. Prelude Rachmaninoff 

b. Novellette, K Major ) _ , 

\ Schumann 

c. Nachtsuick, F Major ) 

4. VIOLIN SOLO, " Fantasie Caprice," Vieuxtemps 

5. DUO, "Rondo," . . Chopin 

Mr. Richard Zeckwer and Miss Corbin 

6. a. Oriental Dance, Sinding 

b. Etude, C sharp minor, ) 

C. Valse, A flat, op. 53, J ^^ 

7. SOPRANO SOLO, 

a. Ecstasy, Mrs. Beach 

b. Swallows, Cowen 

8. Concertstuck, Chaminade 

(Orchestral accompaniment arranged for Second Pianoj 



PATRONESSES 



Mrs. Isaac Doughten 

Mrs. A. C. Doughten 

Mrs. Aaron Ogden Dayton 
Mrs. Levi Farnham 
Miss Fearon 

Mrs. Samuel H. Grey 

Mrs. E. L. B. Godfrey 
Mrs. Isaiah Hackett 

Mrs. Henry Hanford 
Miss Heyl 
Miss Mary Heyl 

Mrs. George W. Jessup 

Mrs. Richard F. Miller 

Mrs. Churchman Meeteer 

Mrs. Alexander McAlister 
Mrs. C. L. Prince 

Mrs. Edwin E. Read 

Mrs. Charles Stockham 
Mrs. Oliver Smith 

Mrs. John Starr, Jr. 

Mrs. Frederick Voigt 
Mrs. Zimmerman 







¥61 



P 



■ 



7 



ALUMNI 



Philadelphia 



Till? 

SEASON 1898-99 Mimical 



i I i 



Academy 



THIRD CONCERT 

SATURDAY EVENING, APRIL 15 

AT 8 O'CLOCK 



J617 SPRUCE STREET 



- 



Ml 




P 



PROGRAMME 



DUO, for two Pianos— Variations Hollander 

MiSSES M. Shapley and A. Mukenfus 

VOCAL— Spring Song Mendelssohn 

Mrs. David Wood 

( a. Nocturne ) 

PIANO— \ I Hille 

{b. Walzer j 

Miss Sei<ma Katzenstein 

VOCAL—" Gavotte " from Mignon Thomas 

Miss Ella Fitzpatrick 

f a. Etude Chopin 

VIOLINCELLO | 

lb. Capriccio Gotermann 

Mr. Rudolph Hennig 



PROGRAMME 



f a. Air in E minor Moszkowski 

VI PIANO— \ 

( b. Novellette, Op. 46. No. 1 . . MacDowell 

Miss Ethel Lorenz 

VII VOCAL— " Bolero " from Sicilian Vespers . . . Verdi 

Mrs. David Wood 

(a. The Juggleress Moszkoswski 

VIII PIANO— \ b. Mazurka Lee/son 

( c. Perpetual Motion Weber 

Miss Selma Katzenstein 

(a. Absence Little 

IX VOCAL— \ 

(. b. Lullaby Mozart 

Miss Ella Fitzpatrick 

X TWO PIANOS— (eight hands), Wedding Music . . .Jensen 

1. Piano — Misses Gessner and Murphy 

2. Piano — Misses Zogbaum and Shapley 



463rd PUPILS' CONCERT 

GIVEN BY PUPILS 

OH THE INTERMEDIATE DEPARTMENT 

OF THE 

pbilabelpbia flftusical Bcabem\> 

AT THEIR HALL 

1617 SPRUCE STREET 
Wednesday Evening, May 17, 1899 

PROGRAMME 

QUARTETTE— Polka Raff 

i Piano, Misses M. Silberschmidt and H. Smith 
2 Piano, Miss J. HOPPER and MASTER I. B. ELIOTT 

MARIE NOCTURNE Richards 

Miss F. Stahr 

MATINEE de PRINTEMPS Hits 

Miss H. Rex 

TRIO— Polonaise Dietrich 

Misses H. Brown, C. Hein and L. Thelenberg 

BEGEGNUNG Jadassohn 

Miss I. Hastings 

THE TROUBADOUR Rhode 

Miss E. McConnell 

WALTZ Lange 

Miss L. Wilson 

MELODY Demuth 

Master I. B. Eliott 

DUETT—" The Witches' Flight " Russet 

Misses E. Squires and H. Payton 

POLKA MAZURKA Schumann 

Miss E. Stelwagon 

HEIMFAHRT Jadassohn 

Miss H. Place 

DUETT— " Through Forest and Fields " Schulize 

Misses A. Delany and F. Evans 

TWILIGHT FANCIES Keller 

Miss A. Box 

MEADOW DANCE Williams 

Master L. Wister 

THE BLACKSMITH Eyer 

Miss J. Hopper 

HUNTING SONG Gurlitt 

Miss H. Smith 

FUER ELISE Bethoven 

Mrs. W. Knell 

VALSE Spindlex 

Master R. Hansom 

THE MILL Schylte 

Miss A. Delany 

a. " Peace of Evening " Foerster 

b. " The Hunt " Demuth 

Miss M. Silberschmidt 

TROUT DANCE Gaenschals 

Miss J. Lutz 

BERGER WATTEAU Gregh 

Miss E. Squires 

a. " Grandfather's Golden Wedding " Hitler 

b. " The Jugglers " Engelmann 

Miss E. Watt 

The Steimvav Grand Pianns have Iktu furnished by 
N. Stetson, 1209 Chestnut Street 



Hf 





464th CONCERT 






GIVEN BY PUPILS 
OF THE 






Philadelphia 






Musical Academy 

(GERMANTOWN BRANCH) 






-AT- 

YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

Main and Rittenhouse Streets 

GERMANTOWN 






SATURDAY EVENING, APRIL 29, 1899 






AT 8 O'CLOCK 




_ 


■ — -~ 


y 



463rd PUPILS' CONCERT 

GIVEN BY PUPILS 

OH THE INTERMEDIATE DEPARTMENT 

OF THE 

flMMlabelpbia nnmsical Bcabem\> 

AT THEIR HALL 

1617 SPRUCE STREET 
Wednesday Evening, May 17, 1899 

PROGRAMME 

QUARTETTE— Polka Raff 

i Piano, Misses M. Silberschmidt and H. Smith 
2 Piano, Miss J. Hopper and Master I. B. Eliott 

MARIE NOCTURNE Richards 

Miss F. Stahr 

MATINEE de PRINTEMPS Hit: 

Miss H. Rex 

TRIO— Polonaise Dietrich 

Misses H. Brown, C. Hein and L. Thelenberg 

BEGEGNUNG Jadassohn 

Miss I. Hastings 

THE TROUBADOUR Rhode 

Miss E. McConnell 

WALTZ Lange 

Miss L- Wilson 

MELODY Demuih 

Master I. B. Eliott 

DUETT—" The Witches' Flight " Russel 

Misses E. Squires and H. Payton 

POLKA MAZURKA Schumann 

Miss E. Stelwagon 

HEIMFAHRT Jadassohn 

Miss H. Place 

DUETT— " Through Forest and Fields" SchuHze 

Misses A. Delany and F. Evans 

TWILIGHT FANCIES Keller 

Miss A. Box 

MEADOW DANCE Williams 

Master L. Wister 

THE BLACKSMITH Ever 

Miss J. Hopper 

HUNTING SONG Gurlilt 

Miss H. Smith 

FUER ELISE Bethoven 

Mrs. W. Knell 

VALSE Spindler 

Master R. Hansom 

THE MILL Schytte 

Miss A. Delany 

a. " Peace of Evening " Foersler 

b. " The Hunt " Demuih 

Miss M. Silberschmidt 

TROUT DANCE Caenschals 

Miss J. Lutz 

BERGER WATTEAU Gregh 

Miss E. Squires 

a. " Grandfather's Golden Wedding " Hiller 

b. " The Jugglers " Engelmann 

Miss E. Watt 

The Steinway Grand Pianos have been furnished by 
N. Stetson, 1209 Chestnut Street 



PROGRAMME 



PART I 

SYMPHONY CLASS— " Lohengrin " Wagner 

Misses F. Caveny, L. Cops, E. Caveny, F. Doriss 

PIANO— 2nd Valse Godard 

Miss m. Homiller 

PIANO— (a) Sorgenvoll Baumfelder 

[b] Bergerie Behr 

(c) Scherzo Schubert 

Master Paul Freeman 

VOCAL — (a) Repentance Gounod 

(b) Irish FolkSong Foote 

(c) Fruehlingslied Mendelssohn 

Mrs. Wm. F. Allan 

SYMPHOMY CLASS—" Serenade " Schultz 

Misses F. Doriss, L. Cope, A. Audenried, F. Caveny 

VIOLIN— Concertstueck Leonard 

Master Benjamin Damelio 

VOCAL— (a) Liebestreu Brahms 

(b) Au die Mnsik Schubert 

Miss Lottie Stafford 

PIANO— (a) Barcarolle Erlich 

(b) Morceaux Caracteristiques .... Wollenhaupt 
Master W. Brown 



PROGRAMME 



PART II 

PIANO— Rondo Capriccio Mendelssohn 

Miss Florence Doriss 

SYMPHONY CLASS— Bouree Bach 

Miss L. Cope, F. Doriss, F. and E. Caveny 

VIOLIN— Caprice Dankla 

Maurice Kirk 

VOCAL— (a) Melody Lynes 

(b) Scotch Folk Song 

Miss Lottie Garrison 

PIANO— (a) Hunting Song Geibel 

(b) Song Without Words Mendelssohn 

{c) Scarf Dance Chaminade 

Miss Florence Bisel 

PIANO — Introduzione et Allegro Godard 

Miss Florence Caveny 
(Orchestra accompaniment arranged for a second Piano.) 

VOCAL TRIO— (a) Heyman 

(b) . . \ Reinicke 

Miss L. Garrison, Mrs. Allan, Miss L. Stafford 

SYMPHONY CLASS— Wedding March Mendelssohn 

Misses F. Dorris, F. Caveny, E. Caveny, L. Cope 

The Steinway Grands are from N. Stetson, 1209 Chestnut Street 



465th CONCERT 

GIVEN BY PROFESSORS 

pbflabelpbta flftusical Bcabem^ 

AT THEIR HALL 

1617 SPRUCE STREET 
Saturday Evening, May 6, 1899 

At Eight O'clock 

PROGRAMME 

ORGAN SOLO— 6th Sonate, Mendelssohn 

Mr. D. D. Wood 

VIOLIN SOLO— Suite op. 156, Raff 

a. Praeludium, b. Menuetto, c. Perpetuum Mobile 
Mr. G. Hiu.5 

*«**-{£ IctSL,} Wa g ner 

Miss M. Buedinger 

PIANO SOLO— a. Largo from Sonate Tragica MacDowell 

b. Rhapsodie hongrois, N. 14 Liszt 

Mr. Leland Howe 
VOCAL-The poor Peter, R. Zeckwer 

3 Songs with Piano, Violin and Violoncello accompaiiyment 

Miss M. Buedinger 

DUO FOR TWO PIANOS— Suite, op. 33, Arensky 

Messrs R. Zeckwer and Camiue Zeckwer 

TRIO FOR PIANO— Violin and Violoncello, op. 1, N. 2 Beethovan 

a. Adagio-Allegro, b. Largo, c. Scherzo, d. Finale 

Messrs M. Leefson, h. Rattay, J. Hennig 

ADMISSION, 50 CENTS 

The Stein-way Grand Pianos have been furnished by 
N. Stetson, 1209 Chestnut Street 



( 



466th CONCERT 

PUPILS OF THE INTERMEDIATE DEPARTMENT 

pbtlabdpbia musical Hcabems 

Young Men's Christian Association Hall 

15th and Chestnut Streets 

SATURDAY AFTERNOON, MAY 20, 1899 

at 2.30 o'clock 

P RO Q RA M M E 

TRIO— Waltz Strauss 

Misses E. LeBoutilliers, E. Perot and M. Tattersfield 

VA LSE Durandl 

Miss F. Mitchell 

TYROLIAN AIR, with variations Wohlfahrt 

Miss M. Reed 

DUETT— " Entre Acte " Bokm 

Misses I. Ball and E. Steinhart 

a. " Grave Moments " ) 

b. " The Little Northerner " [ Gurlitl 

Miss M. Parsons 

QUARTETLE-op. 149 , Diabelli 

Misses E. Heritage. M. Kirk, A. Search and M. Search 

KINDERSTUECK Mendelssohn 

Miss E. G. Taylor 

DANCE SEMPIJCE Rathbum 

Miss T. Nichterlein 

GALOP Weiss 

Miss I. Taeer 

AU MATIN Godard 

Miss I. Ball 

GAY PEASANT G „ r/l/i 

Miss B. D. McNamee 

HAPPY HOURS Novara 

Miss F. Kirk 

DUETT— " Coining of Santa Claus " Engelmann 

Misses G. and L. Brown 

APREZ LE BAL Morley 

Miss B. Renniger 

MINNELIED Weida 

Miss E. Gomersall 
DUETT— " Meme Makinir " \>«»„»„ 



465th CONCERT 

GIVEN BY PROFESSORS 
OF THE 

pbilabelpbia Musical Hcabem^ 

AT THEIR HALL 

1617 SPRUCE STREET 
Saturday Evening, May 6, 1899 

At Eight O'clock 

PROGRAMME 

ORGAN SOLO— 6th Sonate, Mendelssohn 

Mr. D. D. Wood 

VIOLIN SOLO— Suite op. 156 Raff 

a. Praeludium, b. Menuetto, c. Perpetuum Mobile 
Mr. G. Hille 

VOCAL- { *; l^erlen, } Wagner 

Miss M. Buedinger 

PIANO SOLO-a. Largo from Sonate Tragica MacDowell 

b. Rhapsodie hongrois, N. 14, Liszt 

Mr. Leland Howe 

VOCAL— The poor Peter, R. Zeckzuer 

3 Songs with Piano, Violiu and Violoncello accompanyment 
Miss M. Buedinger 

DUO FOR TWO PIANOS— Suite, op. 33, Arensky 

Messrs R. Zeckwer and Camihe Zeckwer 

TRIO FOR PIANO— Violin and Violoncello, op. 1, N. 2 Beethovan 

a. Adagio-Allegro, b. Largo, c. Scherzo, d. Finale 

Messrs M. Leefson, H. Rattay, j. Hennig 

ADMISSION, 50 CENTS 

The SteimvaY Grand Pianos have been furnished by 
N. Stetson, 1209 Chestnut Street 



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467th CONCERT 




GIVEN BY PUPILS OK THE 




ipbtlafcelpbia flQusical Hcabem^ 


FRIDAY EVENING MAY 19, 


1899 


at 8 o'clock 




PROGRAMME 




PRELUDE 


. . MacDowell 


ETUDE, op. io, No. 7 


.... Chopin 


VALSE, Impromptu 


. . . . Liszt 


Miss C. Darlington 




AIR, from Freischuetz 


.... Weber 


Miss A. Turner 




TARANTELLE 


Mills 


Miss B. Koerper 




SONATE, (Lebe wohl) 


. . . Beethoven 


Miss A. Turner 




THE LARK 


. . Balakirew 


Miss A. Yerkes 




STRADELLA AIR 




Mrs. A. Chandler 




GONDOLIERA 


Liszt 


RIGAUDON 


Raff 


Miss E. Hand 




MORNING 1 


. Mendelssohn 


ON WINGS OF SONG \ ' 




Miss M. Culley 




a SERENADE 


. Schubert-Liszt 


b FANTASIE IMPROMPTU 


.... Chopin 


Miss B. Sellers 




SONATE 


.... Haydn 


Mr. E. Crothers 




\IR f Hu enots 


. . . Meyerbeer 


Mrs. B. Richmond 




SCHERZO, b flat minor 


.... Chopin 


Mr. H. Immermann 




DUO, from Puritani 


.... Bellini 


Messrs Cuminsky and Downs 




TARANTELLE 


Liszt 


Miss J. Folweiler 




AIR. from Favorita 


. . . Donizetti 


Miss A. Reifsnyder 




AIR, from Rigoletto 


Verdi 


Miss E. Hoppe 




DUO from Trovatore 


Verdi 


Miss A. Reifsnyder and Mr. I. MacGehean 


VALSE 


. . Wieniawsky 


Mr. F. Linde 




Tbe Steimvay Grand Pianos have been furnished by 


N. Stetson, 1209 Chestnut Street 









r 



the Class of f 99 

PHILADELPHIA MUSICAL ACADEMY 
Extend an invitation to their - 

Commencement Exercises 

Monday Evening, May 22d 
At Eight o'clock 

At the Hall 
1617 Spruce Street 



Programme. 



PIANO-a. Sonate. Op. 26 

b - "Warum" ) 
" Aufschung " j 

'da Eugenie Taggaf 



VOCAL 



PIANO- 



VOCAL- 



Elizabeth's Prayer " 

Lottie Kincaide Garrison 
-a- Prelude and Fugue, No. 2 
b ' " Ros amunde" Impromptu 
Emilie G. M. Smith 

-a. Air from "Creation " . 
b - "'hre Stimme" - 
c - "Song of the Nautch Girl " 
Lottie Kincaide Garr, son 



Beethoven 

Schumann 

Wagner 



Bach 

Schubert 



Haydn 

Schumann 

DeRoven 



Programme. 



PIANO— Etuden. Op. 10, No. 3 ) 
Etuden. Op. 10, No. Ill 
Concerto D Minor 



Chopin 
Mendelssohn 



(da Eugenie Taggart 



VOCAL— Duet from "Aida" Verdi 

Misses L. K. Garrison and L. Stafford 



PIANO— Nocturno. Op. 27, No. 2\ 
EUide. Op. 25, No. 8 ) 
Rondo Capriccio. Op. 22 

Emilie G.' M. Smith 



Chopin 
Mendelssohn 



! : 



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„/, iy/,/,. r/rr/, '' 



^ 70 





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Programme 



Prelude and Fugue, No. 2 


Roch 


Concerto, D Minor (Cadenza by Reiuecke) 


Mozart 


Miss Leila Reed 




Prelude and Fugue, No. 6 


Bach 


Concerto, C Minor (2d and 3d movement) 


Beethoven 


Miss Clara Deal 




Prelude and Fugue, No. 5 


Bach 


Concerto, C Minor (1st movement) 


Beethoven 


Cadenza by Moscheles 




Miss Louvenia M. Wicks 




Etudes, Op. 10, No. 3 


Chopin 


Etincelles 


Aloszkowski 


Miss Leila Reed 




Etude, Op. 10, No. 5 


Chopin 


Impromptu, Op- 142, No. 3 


Schubert 


Miss Clara Deal 




Etude, Op. 25, No. g (Octaves) 


Chopin 


Witches' Dance 


MacDowell 



Miss Louvenia M. Wicks 
The Steinway Grands are from N. Stetson, 1209 Chestnut Street 



Programme 



Second Organ Concerto 
Prelude and Fugue 



Henry Immermann 
(Pupil of the Fugue Clnss) 

r. Clarence; D. Wilson 



Vocal — "There is a Green Hill " 

Miss Lottie Stafford 

Pedal Study, D Minor 

Meditation 

Caprice 

Mr. Clarence D. Wilson 

Vocal a. Air from "Orpheus" 

b. " Der Kreuzzug " 

c. " Crossing the Bar" 

Miss Lottie Stafford 



Prelude and Fu 



gue, 



A Minor 



Fantasie, D Minor, Op. 176 

Mr. Clarence D. Wilson 



Rebbeling 

Dubois 

Deshayes 

Gluck 

Schubert 

Dudley Buck 

Bach 
Merkel 



Hook & Hastings Church Organ, Boston 







igffg 








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A 



flDustcal tfunb Iball 

2nd Season Xccu6t stl * bove mbxb 

1898^9 Twenty ¥ 

¥ Symphony Concerts 

HENRY GORDON THUNDER, Conductor 

Friday Afternoons, from November J 8th to April 7th 
(March 31st excepted) 

TWENTIETH CONCERT, APRIL 7th, 1899 

WAGNER PROGRAMME 

• Soloists - 

JENNIE FOELL, Soprano 

KATHERINE C. McQUCKlN, Alto 

MATTHEW F. DONOVAN, Tenor 

WILLIAM C. CLEAR, Tenor 

WILLIAM J. RIINUEISEN, Bass 

(The repetitions from the previous Wagner Programme, of Februarv 24, are by request.) 

Procession of the Gods to Walhalla . . . " das rheingold" 
Siegfried Idyll. 

Song of the Rhine Daughters "Gotterdammerung" 

Good Friday Spell -, 

Kilngsor's Magic Garden and the Flower Girls -"PARSIFAL'' 

Prelude to First Act and Finale to Third Act i 

Siegfried's Rhine journey "Gotterdammerung" 

quintett "Meistersinger" 

Miss Foell, Miss McGuckin, Mr. Donovan, Mr. Clear, Mr. Ringeisen. 
PRELUDE AND FINALE "TRISTAN UND ISOLDE." 



Programme 



Prelude and Fugue, No. 17 

Fantasie, C Minor 

Miss Nellie S. Evans 

Vocal — a. Gipsy Song 
b. "L'ete" 

Miss Irma Nachod 

Prelude and Fugue, No. 9 

Concertstiick 

Mrs. John S. Buchanan 

Vocal — a. " The Well " 
b. " Widinung " 

Miss Irma Nachod 

Sonate, Op. 26 

Etude, Op. 25, No 7 ] 

Romanze from Concert, Op. 11 \ 

Miss Nellie Evans 

Vocal — a. "Sunshine Song " 

b. "Sleep, Little Tulip" 

Miss Irma Nachod 

Etude, Op. 10, No. 3 
Liebestraume, No. 1 
Polacca Brillante 

Mrs. John S. Buchanan 



Bach 

Mozart 



Dvorak 
Chaminade 



Bach 
made 



Goldmark 

Schumann 



Chopi 



Grieg 

Nevin 



Chopin 
Liszt 
Weber 



The Steiuway Grands are from N. Stetson, 1209 Chestnut Street 



List of Soloists at the Concerts 



Marie Kunkel Zimmermann, Soprano. 

Katherine C. McGuckin, Alto. 

Nicholas Douty, Tenor. 

Richard Zeckwer, Piano. 

Joseph C. Cousans, Baritone. 

Liza Mohr-Carow, Piano. 

John F. Braun, Tenor. 

George Dundas, Tenor. 

Emma Suelke, Soprano. 

Edward A. Brill, Violin. 

Chas. F. Graff, Baritone. 

Emma Osbourn, Alto. 



Jeannette Fernandez, Soprano. 
Frank C. Cauffman, Baritone. 
William J. Ringeisen, Bass. 
Louise H. Orndorff, Alto. 
Frederick E. Hahn, Violin. 
Camille W. Zeckwer, Piano. 
Mauritz Leefson, Piano. 
Louisa May Hopkins, Piano. 
Jennie Foell, Soprano. 
Matthew F. Donovan, Tenor. 
William C. Clear, Tenor. 



List of Works Performed 



'"American compositions, 15. i'First pel U>rn 

ADDICKS: *+rPastorale. 

BACH: Aria on the G string. 

BARTLETT : *Love's Rhapsody (Mr. Dundas.) 

BEETHOVEN: Second Symphony. 

Seventh Symphony. 

Overture, " Egmont." 

BEMBERG : " Now, Joan ardently kissed " (Miss McGuckin.) 
BIZET : Suite, " L'Arlesienne," No. 1. 
BORODIN : tA Sketch of the Steppes of Central Asia. 
BRAHMS: Fourth Symphony. 

Three Hungarian Dances. 
CAUFFMAN-. *Introspection (Mr. Cauffman.) 

*Suite, "Salammbo." 
CHADWICK: *tSecond Symphony. 

♦Overture, " Melpomene." 
Polonaise, Op. 40. 
■ Charmant Oiseau," (Miss Fernandez. ) 
" Thou Great Mighty Sea," (Mme. Suelke.) 
Fifth Symphony, "To the New World." 
Four Slavonic Dances. 
Two Biblical Songs, (Mrs. Osbourn.) 
FOERSTER : *tPrelude, " Faust." 
FOOTE : HSuite in D minor. 
FRANZ : " Good Night," (Mr. Cauffman.) 
GILCHRIST : *Symphony in C. 
GOLDMARK: Overture, " Sakuntala." 

Scherzo in E minor. 
GOETZ : Symphony in F. 
GRIEG : Suite. " Peer Gynt," No. 1. 
HAENDEL, " Honor and Arms," (Mr. Cousans.) 

HAHN: ^Romance. 



; Philadelphia, 10. ttFirst performance 



CHOPIN: 
DAVID : ' 
DELIBES: 
DVORAK: 



HAYDN : ■• In Native Worth," (Mr. Braun., 

Symphony, " La Reine de France." 
HUMPERDINCK : Prelude to " Haensel und Gretel." 
KJERULF: Sehnsucht, I Mr. Cauffman.) 
LANG : *Symphony in B flat. 
LEHMANN: " Ah, Moon of My Delight." (Mr Douty.) 

"The Earthy Hopes," (Mrs. Osbourn.) 
LEONCAVALLO: Prologue, " Pagliacci," (Mr. Cousans 
LISZT : Symphonic Poem, " Les Preludes." 

Third Hungarian Rha] 

"Die Lorelei," (Miss 

MacDOWELL : *Suite. No. 2. 
MACKENZIE: Benedictus. 
MASSENET : 



"It is Enough," (Mr. Graff.) 
MEYERBEER : Romanza, " Les Hugenots." (Mr. Dun 
MOHR : *Concerto. iMrs. Mohr-Carow.) 
MOLIQUE: Concerto Op. 21, (Mr. Brill.) 
MOSZKOWSKI : Suite, " Boabdil " 
MOZART . Symphony in G minor. 

Coronation Concerto. (Mr. R. Zeckwer.) 
PONCHIELLI : " In Questa Fieri Momenti," (Mrs. Zi 

La Cieca, (Miss Orndorff.) 
RAFF : Third Symphony, (" Ira Walde,") 
ROSSINI : Overture. " William Tell." 
RUBINSTEIN : Bal Costume, Suite No. 1. 

tThird Concerto, Op. 45, (Mr. Leefson.) 
SCHUBERT : Unfinished Symphony. 

"Die Allmacht," I Mr. Graff.) 
"L'Abeille," (Mr. Hahn.) 
SCHUMANN: First Symphony. 

" Traumerei and Romance." 
SINDING : fConcerto, D flat, (Miss Hopkins.) 
SMETANA : tSymphonic Poem, " Vltava." 
STOBBE : *tfSuite for strings 
ST. SAENS : " My Heart at Thy Sweet Voice, 
Prelude, " The Deluge." 
Introduction and Rondo Caprice 
TSCHAIKOWSKI : Overture Fantasie, " Ron 

Sixth. Symphony, (Pathetic.) (Gi 
WAGNER : Siegfried Id 



(Miss McGuckin.) 

1. (Mr. Hahn.) 
and Juliet." 



Kaisermarsch. 

Overture, " Tannhauser." 

" Dich Theure Halle," (Mrs. Zim 

Procession of the Gods to Walhalla, 

Wotan's Farewell and Ma 

Siegmund Heiss Ich, (Mr. 

Forest Murmurs, " Siegfried." 

Funeral March, " Gotterdammerung 



ici 



ann.) "Tannhauser." 
Das Rheingold." iGiven twice 
le, (Mr. Ringeisen), " Die Walk 
)ie Walkure." 



Siegfried's Rhinej. 

Rhine Daughter's Song, 

Prelude and Finale. "Tristan und Isolde." (Given twice.) 

Vorspiel, " Die Meistersinger." 

" Am Stillen Herd," " (Mr. Douty.) 

Quintett - " Die Meistersinger." 

(Miss Foell, Miss McGuckin, Mr. Donovan. Mr. Clear, 

Prelude to First Act and Finale to Third Act, " Parsifal." ) 

Good Friday Spell, 

Klingsor's Magic Garden and the Flower Girls, " J 

WEBER: Overture, " Der Frelschutz." 

Scene and Prayer, " Der Freischutz." (Mme. Suelke.) 
ZECKWER. C. : *ttConcerto in E minor, (Mr. C. Zeckwer.) 



Graduates' Concert... 

of the 

Philadelphia 
Musical Academy 



MUSICAL FUND HALL 

Eighth and Locust Streets 

SATURDAY EVENING, MAY 27, 1899 

at eight o'clock 



Ce^L*.-^ 




U'HJI 



MTTSICAI COMMENCEMENT. 
Concert and Distribution of Diplo 
mas to Graduates qf Philadel- 
phia Academy. 

'"" • ■ '' .- ..r ' ,i the PlilladeJphl 

eVercSes «* "S^'^T 'W In"":;" 



^ ' 



it (two branches}— Miss L-otl 
no— Mi.-H Jessie Fulweller 

■J 1 '" 1 KuMi^n.n. aus & jjth. i 
• Al J i> l; iy i,,r. Mr. Frederick biuu 
h aB on V ^" , N ',. ™ ck *. W«- John 




concerts wliirh have 
Philadelphia Musical Academy 



according to tbe awards, 
"ill s^lf,rrtl programme 
ice of the orchestra class. 



5 oi the evening. The gradual 

rd; In piano, Jessie L. Pu^weU 

Darlington, Ethel Lorenz, Ma 

I ' , " 1 " ii ' i ' llniie, Louvenla M. 

Evans, Clara Hornier Deal, EugeDla 

ocal departmei 




readlng n ahe D did eH ii P o e t Ct l ° ^''"ebtfiilncBfT'of 

ll'SlPllili 



__^„TSS>ra^6*°5he 

,meM°.l' ,.,\mie tbat "* „| t V) 



,1,1 : ...,.,■,■■ 



' "*££» 



1 'fe»fr=s.-^B^v 



i P r ?I? nf tup school <» Quotes S^^ppHcnOn} 1 > 
Mbit oi >-"^ ibo s\J" pnrnest ll ^ nl prof- 

\ oT» e volM 1 ^ e '?kroth« »* " ' ^^r, I 

\V£ 5w»™^ an f5w»»' 4 1 CMS« riU LeeI " 



472d CONCERT 

of the 

Philadelphia Musical Academy 

given by the Graduates of '99 
PROGRAMME 

OVERTURE—" Alceste " Gluck 

Coda by F. Weingaertner 
Orchestra Class under direction of Prof. Gustave Hille 

CONCERTO— B flat minor X. Scharwenka 

Miss Mary Taylor and Orchestra 

CONCERTSTUECK Weber 

Miss Cornelia Darlington and Orchestra 

CONCERTO— 2nd and 3rd Movement Raff 

Mr. Frederick Linde and Orchestra 

VOCAL TRIO, from William Tell Rossini 

Misses L- Garrison, I. Nachod and L. Stafford 

CONCERTO— F sharp minor Hiller 

Miss Jessie Louise Fulweiler and Orchestra 

SECOND CONCERTO— A major Liszt 

Miss Ethel Lorenz and Orchestra 

PIANO SOLO— Sonate, op. 22 Schumann 

Miss Selma Katzenstein 

Distribution of Diplomas, Teachers' Certificates 
and Gold Medals 

ORCHESTRA— Carnival Venetien Burgmein 

Nr. 2 Rosaura, Nr 4 Le Seigneur Arlequiu 

The Steinway Grand is from N. Stetson, 1209 Chestnut Street 



GRADUATES' CONCERTS 



Miss Eugenie B. Taggart "l 

Y Piano Graduates 

Miss Emma Smith J 

Miss Lottie K. Garrison . Vocal Graduate 

Monday Evening, May 22, at 8 o'clock 
at the Hall, 16 17 Spruce Street 

Miss Louvenia M. Wicks ] 

Miss Leila Reed . . . . L Piano Graduates 

Miss Clara Horsley Deal J 

Tuesday Evening, May 23, at 8 o'clock 

Mr. Clarence Wilson Organ Graduate 

Miss Lottie Stafford Vocal Graduate 

Wednesday Evening, May 24, at 8 o'clock 

Miss Nellie S. Evans "1 

[- Piano Graduates 

Mrs. John S. Buchanan j 

Miss Irma Nachod Vocal Graduate 

Thursday Evening, May 25, at 8 o'clock 
at the Hall, 1617 Spruce Street 




- 




Public OrcfcgDfal Concert 



ItYusical T»«« fia" 

at eigM-«tte«n 



mr $. marie KunKel-Zimmerman, Soprano 
miss Gertrude Kepplwan, WM 



/ 



\ 



Grand Vocal 

and 

Instrumental Concert 

Given for the Benefit 
of the New Chnrch 

St. Thomas Aquinas 

BEACH HAVEN, N. J. 
Friday Evening, August 4th, 1899 

at 8 O'clock 
AT THE ENQLESIDE HOTEL 

PROGRAMME 

PIANO DUET-3 Polkas de Concerts Gruen/eld 

MESSRS. RICHARD AND CAMILLE ZECKWER 

VOCAL— Elizabeth's Prayer from Tannhauser Wagner 

MISS LOTTIE GARRISON 

VIOLIN FANTASIE, " Litter, Karin " c. W.Zeckwer 

MR. HOWARD RATTAY 

VOCAL— Air from Manon Puccini 

SIUNOR MARIO DEL SOL 

ANDANTE AND ALLEGRETTO from Sonate for Piano 

and Clarionet Brahms 

MESSRS. W. PETZOLD AND R. ZECKWER 

VOCAL-Dormi pure Souderi 

MISS MARIE ZECKWER 

PIANO SOLI-.. Les Sylvains Chaminade 

*• Caprice c. IV. Zeckwer 

MR. C. W. ZECKWER 

VOCAL-Song of the Nautch Girl De Koven 

MISS LOTTIE GARRISON 

PIANO SOLO-Polka de la Reine Raff 

MR. RICHARD ZECKWER 

VIOLIN SOLO-Polonaise Winiawski 

MR. HOWARD RATTAY 
VOCAL DUO 

MISS L. GARRISON AND SIGNOR DEL SOL 




Programme 



Programme 



Charles D. Carter 



Overture " As You Like It 



Camille Zcckwer 



Songs 



Piano Concerto (two movements) 
Elegie 
Tarantelle 

Mr. Camille Zeckwer 
Mr. Mauritz Leefson, Director 



NICHOLAS DOUTY, . " Thy Blue Eyes ' 

RUSSELL KING MILLER, "The Rose" 

E.M.ZIMMERMAN . "Loreley" 

DAVID E. CROZIER, . "Love's Return" 

Mrs. Marie Kunkel-Zimmerman 



frank 6. Cauffman 

Prelude " Alciphron " 

Mr. Henry Gordon Thunder, Director 

fienry J\. Cans 

Symphony No. i, op. 30 (two movements) 
Allegro Maestoso 



Scherzo Allegro Vivace 



UJ. lit. Silcbrist 



Violin and Pianc 



Rhapsodie 
Perpetual Motion 
Miss Gertrude Keppleman 



Stanley JTddicks 
Philip fi. 6oepp 



a. Pastorale 



b. Academic March 

Directed by Mr. Henry Gordon Tbunder 



• 

Grand Vocal 

and 

Instrumental Concert 


Given for the Benefit 
of the New Chnrch 




St. Thomas Aqu 


inas 


BEACH HAVEN, N. J. 




Friday Evening, August 4th, 

at 8 O'Clock 


1899 


AT THE ENQLESIDE HOTEL 




# 




PROGRAMME 




PIANO DUET— 3 Polkas de Concerts Gruenfeld 

MESSRS. RICHARD AND CAMILLE ZECKWER 


VOCAL— Elizabeth's Prayer from Tannhauser .... 
MISS LOTTIE GARRISON 


. . Wagner 


VIOLIN FANTASIE, " Litten Karin " C. 

MR. HOWARD RATTAY 


W. Zeckwer 


VOCAL — Air from Manon 

SIGNOR MARIO DEL SOL 


. . Puccini 


ANDANTE AND ALLEGRETTO from Sonate for Piano 
and Clarionet 

MESSRS. W. PETZOLD AND R. ZECKWER 


. . Brahms 


VOCAL — Dormi pure 

MISS MARIE ZECKWER 


. . Souderi 


PIANO SOLI— a. Les Sylvains 

b. Caprice C. 

MR. C. W. ZECKWER 


Ghaminade 
W. Zeckwer 


VOCAL— Song of the Nautch Girl 


. De Koven 


MISS LOTTIE GARRISON 




PIANO SOLO— Polka de la Reine 


.... Raff 


MR. RICHARD ZECKWER 




VIOLIN SOLO— Polonaise 

MR. HOWARD RATTAY 


Winiawski 


VOCAL DUO 

MISS L. GARRISON AND SIGNOR DEL SOL 





\ 



V 



Q£4(^ 



OH 



0« II 



. 



474th Concert 

Philadelphia Musical Academy, 

1617 SPRUCE STREET, 

Saturday Evening, Nov. 4, at 8 o'clock, 

AT 

MUSICAL FUND HALL, 8th and Locust Sts. 



PROGRAMME 

Duo for Two Pianos — Andante and Variations, op. 46 . Schumann. 
Messrs. Aime Lacchaume and R. Zeckwer. 

Violin Solo — " Concerto No. 2," (first movement) Bruch. 

Mr. Carl Doem, (first appearance in Philadelphia.) 

Vocal — Air: " Revenge" (from Alexander Feast) .... Haendel. 

Mr. H. Kirkland. 

Piano Soli— (a) Nocturno F Sharp 1 

\ Chopin. 

{6) Ballade G min. J 

Mr. Cari, Samans. 

Violoncello Soli — (a) " Evening Song " Schumann. 

(d) " At The Fountain " Da.vid.off. 

Mr. R. Hennig. 

Vocal— (a) " Dear Love When In Thine Arms " | 

\ . . . . Chadwick. 
(A) "Sweetheart," J 

Mr. H. KlRKtAND. 

Violin Solo — " Faust Fantasie " Wieniawski. 

Mr. Cari, Doeu,. 

Trio for Piano, Violin and Violoncello, op. iS .... Saint Saens. 

(a) Allegro Vivace, (6) Andante, (c) Scherzo, (d) Allegro. 

Messrs. A. Lachadjie, C. Doeli,, R. Hennig. 

THE STEINWAY GRANDS HAVE BEEN FURNISHED BY N. STETSON, 
1209 CHESTNUT STREET. 



3 



* 



TH 



474THJMM 

By Philad'a Musical 
Academy Faculty. 

DQELL'S APPEARANCE 

R. Hennig's 'Cello Solos Won 
Well-Deserved Applause. 



% 



Local violinists and musicians In 
general turned out in force last night 
attend the four hundred and sev- 
y-fourth concert given by members 
the Philadelphia Musical Academy 
;ulty at Musical Fund Hall. The In- 
terest centered chiefly in the first ap- 
pearance in this country of Carl Doell, 
the Leipslc violinist, who recently ar- 
rived here. The general verdict was 
that while Mr. Doell has many good 
points-such as big technique, large 
and full tone, and good staccato-he 
did not, in other respects, entirely ful- 
fill the highest expectations, and the 
most that can be said is that he had 
only a moderate success. 
i His opening number was the first 
movement of Max Beuch's second con- 
certo, and while he, no doubt, was 
suffering somewhat from nervousness 
'he nevertheless appeared to better , 
advantage in this number than in the a. 
brilliant Faust Fantasie of Wienlaw- it| 



two pianos, was given u, 
Aime Lachaume and I. 

satisfying lumbers of the entire pro 

Sr 4rToth e »r new-comer, Mr. H. Klrk- n 
larXTaifg (but did not distinguish him-" 
selfl an aria by Haendel, 
songs by Chadwick. 
Carl Samans, the pianls 



Ballade in G minor. 

r. R. Hennig — 
edly applauc 



gave a 
, Chopin 

? and the 



In response to ' the demand for an 
encore he played an exquisite Ro- 
mance'by Van Goens. 

The concluding number was »aint- 
Saens" trio for piano, vie in and cello 



ZECKWER CONCERT 



Two New Masters Introduced by the 

Philadelphia Musical Academy. 

The four hundred and seventy-fourth con- 

ren of the riiihut.'li'Uia Musical Academy, 
giv.-n at Musical Fund Hall last night, lntro- 

I,a,]Kiiiim\ a justly renowned and artisri.- 
pianist, ami r ; iii Doell. violinist, a graduate 
at the High School of Music. Berlin. 

I.aohaunn- had previously been heard in 

m.:- ri:v uiHiii nearly •■\-'vy r nt invasion 

,,;■ ;m i!i]i--L'i;iui violin virtu. ..-■"> . 

in miscellaneous concert. He has earned 

Yi\< r.'ptirat ii.u lioth as .'iniifmsor and soloist 

!,V 1 lir ;il-: i ,i.ir I'Xerll. ■[!■'■■ nf Ills SL'llnn]. jill'l 



'4Uti 




I 










&SM EDMUND WOLSIEFFER, 

522{j|>r SECRETARY and TREASURER, 



Annual Dues $1.00 

For Active or Patron Members. 

No Initiation Fee. 



Organized July 5th, 1889, under the auspices of the jtflusic f eachcrs' Rational jisscciation. 
Executive Committee. Program Committee. Auditing Committee. 



J. P. Roth, Chair-man, allentown. 
Frank D. Hartman. allentown. 

Edgar B. Kocher, allent< 



Thomas a'Becket, chairman, philaoelp 

Richard ZECKWER, Philadelphia. 

Arthur L. Manchester, 



GILBERT R. COMBS, Chairman, Philadelphia. 
WILLIAM WOLSIEFFER, Philadelphia. 

Theodore Presser, Phil 



CQtlQ ^QQual ]yieetir)6< 



"AllentoWn: Wednesday and "| hursday, Dec. 27 and 
(Of/lt/ade/Miia, Qctober.1 






474^ Concert 

GIVEN BY PROFESSORS OF THE 

Philadelphia Musical Academy, 

1617 SPRUCE STREET, 

Saturday Evening, Nov. 4, at 8 o'clock, 

AT 

MUSICAL FUND HALL, 8th and Locust Sts. 



PROGRAMME 

Duo for Two Pianos— Andante and Variations, op. 46 . Schumann. 
MESSRS. AlME LAUCHAUME AND R. ZECKWER. 

Violin Solo— " Concerto No. 2," (first movement) Bruch. 

MR. CAM Doem, (first appearance in Philadelphia.) 
Vocal-Air: "Revenge "(from Alexander Feast) .... Haendel. 

Mr. H. Kirkxand. 
Piano Soli— (0) Nocturne F Sharp \ Chopin. 

(6) Ballade G min. J 

MR. Cart. Samans. 

Violoncello Soli— (a) " Evening Song " Schumann. 

(6) " At The Fountain " Davidoff. 

Mr. R. Hennig. 
Vocal— (a) ' ' Dear Love When In Thine Arms ' ' j Chadwick. 

(b) "Sweetheart," J 

Mr. H. Kirkland. 

Violin Solo-" Faust Fantasie " Wieniawski. 

Mr. Cari. Doeix. 

Trio for Piano, Violin and Violoncello, op. 18 .... Saint Saens. 

(a) Allegro Vivace, {b) Andante, (c) Scherzo, (rf) Allegro. 

Messrs. A. Lachaome, C. Doeix, R. Hennig. 

THE STE1NWAY GRANDS HAVE BEEN FURNISHED BY N. STETSON, 
120» CHESTNUT STREET. 



3 



#- 



j 474TH_C0NCERT 

I By Philad'a Musical! 
j Academy Faculty. { 
|dqell's appearance 

R. Hennig's 'Cello Solos Won| 
Well-Deserved Applause. 

Local violinists and musician^ 
f o en :«enrthe d C — and sev- 

tv,at while Mr Doell has many b uuu 

I Cly a moderate success 
e movement of Max Be^s ^^ 
- Suff^omewnat from nervousness 3 
i he nevertheless ^f t ^ ^the a 

skL "''V^ormv'^rtormince of Schu-'e 
i mtnr^InSS/ and vartatlon.. op J 

'";• """ 'Itae lachau^e Ji Richard, 
Messrs. Aim , e ' nnp of the most| 

i^JvlnW ™2»™™ of the entire pro. 
KnoXr -Y-^nS'di^Ss^ , 
la .lf d ,' angaria by ute?££. and two | 
ings'by Chadwick. 
Carl Samans the pianist Ra 
leSS-the fS Nocturne and the 
BaTa S de R in HG mlnor v , e . 

m e y xnS. P sUe U 'V"ulnl Song." of 
Schumann and the difficult Davldofl 

" * " e 4HSra. ae So^« 

encore, ne piaj tu an i 
mance by Van Goens. 

The, ™n clu A in 5 an , o™?oUn and 'cello 
fneTy pYayerhl^Messrs. Lachaume 
[..,.11 »m Hennig. 



%» 



ZECKWER COHCEBT 

Two \-ew Masters Introduced by tne 

Philadelphia Musical Academy. 

The four hundred and seventy-fourth con- 
' n f the l'hiheleli'liia Musical Academy. 
''"\,".,i Mnsicl Viin.l Hull I.ki nlt-'lit. Intr-. 
V, , 1 'iViicw members of the faculty Aime 
l.ucliinniic u ■,'"*' vlollulsu a graduate 
pmnlsUand L art P^^^e', Berlin. 

viuiisiy been heard iu 



i'' : "ni','-!''"in' ''■'"- ''i.'l!i!~V,.rk. The 
. '.,".," ,n... «hi' I'- '.■ | " >ecl the pl '°ff 



0i4t»«i 



IK-N^lf: 



leeil himself to thi 
R. Hennig. played 



!-'i-~''.!~sl-llns "in J 

.-nee <i 



CLEMENT A. MARKS, 




H^entt) ^ QQual fyleetir)6 



day and Thursday, ®ec. 27 and 28, 1899. 



To the Members — Greeting! 

It is with pleasure 
"TENTH ANNUAL MEETING" of the Penn 
tion will be held in Allentown, Pa 



that we are able to announce, that the 
iylvania State Music Teachers' Associa- 
, on the 27th and 28th of December, of 



thi 



it being the "Tenth Anniversary" of the Asso 
ial efforts are being made to make the occasion 



ati 



.rector 



Marks, Conductor. 



year, and 
existence, spec 
able one. 

While the entire Program has not yet been decided upon, among othe 
things the Program Committee have the following in view! 

LECTURE ON HARMONY, by Dr. H. A. Clarke, Prof. University of Penna 

ILLUSTRATION AND LECTURE ON ACOUSTICS, by Prof. Richard Zeckwer, 
Principal of the Philadelphia Musical Academy. 

ESSAY ON MUSIC IN PUBLIC SCHOOLS, by Mr. Enoch 
of Music in the Public Schools of Philadelphia. 

CHORUSES BY THE ORATORIO SOCIETY, of Allentown, C 

ROUND TABLE TALK. 

There will be many other fine attractions offered, and it is 
earnestly hoped that the members of the Association from all parts of the 
State may attend, for their own benefit and enjoyment as well as for the 
advancement of the Association, which needs support. 

The Association needs funds, to cover its current expenses and 
arranging for this Annual Meeting, and we therefore respectfully request 
those members, who are in arrears for dues, to remit the same without 
delay to the undersigned Secretary and Treasurer, who will return receipt . 

We also want NEW MEMBERS, and if each present member will secure 
only ONE new member (as per within application blanks), it will be a 
great help. Looking for an early and favorable reply, we are, 
Fraternally yours, 

CLEMENT A. MARKS, President. 
EDMUND WOLSIEFFER, Sec'y and Treas. 

1117 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



h-i 



j£. /s 



h 






, \ 



I B- 

41 B- 

1 li§zil # &§!=>?! f 

i 

GROSSES 



Conzert und Ball 



i i 

I §»««* tfcicr fcc» 25iabrincit Dtrigcntcnsjubilaumd fees I 

f ' I" 

Mmtl W. E. WINTER, 



montag, den u. noocmbcr ism, 

Anfang punkt S Uhr. 



3unger mannerdw-fiallc, 

6. und Vine Strasse. 



^Aurora und Liederhaini^ 



Krfalli.mr Mil 



i ALLEMANIA. COLUMBIA, LIEDERKRANZ & SOZIALISTISGHE LIEDERTAFEL. 

1 



SOLISTEN 

Frl. EMMA WINTER, 



Piano. 



Herr RICHARD ZECKWER, j 
I Orchester WM. KALITZ. 



| Der bei diesem Conzert benutzte Fliigel ist von der bekannten Firma 
1 HEPPE & SOX. 



■ ' -r ■*' •;- -7' -!• ■;" '■ ■'■ -I' '•• 7- -i- -;• -I- ■': 7- - : * "• ' : ' 7- -? -? 7- 7- -I- 7- 7- 7- - : - 7- v 7- 7- ' : - 7" ■'-: -V 7" 7' 7- -?* 7' - 7- - ; - - : ' 7- -> 7- 7- 7- ■- 



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^PRGGRflfflffl. 



FEST-OUV] 



Leutner if 



CHOR, "Dzr €isisiedler an die Hathi" 

Aurora und Liederhain, Hi 
Konmi. Trost der 



WINTER, Di 



.rii r.ergt 



::u.i 



CHOR, 



Singt ub. r's Mi er sein Abendlied [f; 

/ii Got1 - Lob " Hafen | 

Die Jahre wie die Wolken gehn 1 

Und lassen mich hier einsam stehn; | 
Die Welt hat mich vergessen. 

Da tratst du wunderbai /„ mir. |. 

Wenn ich beim Waldesrauschen liier g; 

Gedankenvoll gesessen. *■ 

O, Trost der Welt, du stille Nacht, | 

Der Tag hat mich so miide gemacht ; *' 

Das weite Meer schon dunkelt. | 

Lass ausruhn mich von Lust und Noth, | 

Bis dass das ew'ge Morgenroth | 

Den stillen Wald durchfunkelt. » 

f 

SOLO, a) "Norturne" Chopin | 

b) "Valse" Rubinstein | 

Frl. Emma Winter. 

i) "Eom&ardijches Sianddw Ka PP eii jjj: 

ora und Liederhain, Herr W, E. WINTER, Dirigeiit. 

:,: Bin dir gut, meiu holdes Kindchen, | 

Dir's zu sageu fallt uicht sehwer I 

Ach dem rundes Rosenmiindchen £ 
Reizt zuin Kusse mich gar sehr. :,: 

Mariettina, lieber Schatz, I- 

Ich bitt', ich flehe dich, | 

Konmi mein susses Taubchen, * 

K. .mm und kiissse mich. :,. t 



Mariettina, lieber Schatz, etc. 






-..i-.i-.r..^. 1 .^.;..i..i..i..i..t..i..^.^.^..i 

1 

■I 

I 



;-i-i'd-i--i-.i-4-i.i-.;..;..i..i..i..i..i- + .i..i..i..t..i..i 



:,: Lass sie geifern. lass sie reden, 
Miissig Wasser fliesst iu's Meer, 
Ihre Zungen schmahen Jeden, 
Selbst wenn's Gott im Hiinmel war'. :,: 
:,: Mariettina, lieber Schatz, etc. :,: 

i "Sangcrmarf* Engeisberg 

Ade ihr alten Sorgen ! 

Heut froh und lustig morgen ! 

Wir seligen Knaben ziehn leicht durch die Welt. 

Wer wird an solchen Tagen , 

Nach Buch und Rechnuug fragen ? 

Ein Liedchen ist iiberall wie klingeudes Geld. 

So wie im Wald 

Das Eclio schallt, J 

Halloh, halloh, halloh ! 

Tout unser Sang | 

Die Strass' entlang, 

So friscli und froh ! K 

Aus manchem Hans, aus mancliein Hans 
Ein Lockenkopfchen guckt heraus |j 

Und denkt : da geht der Knab', |i 

Den ich im Herzen hab' ! 

Komm gescliwind, 

Holdes Kind, fs 

Dass im Ernst fi 

Du was lernst ! 
Sprich, hat mein freundlicher Gruss 
Dich gestiirzt in Verdruss? if 

& 

Wie man singt, *; 

Wie man trinkt, If- 

Lehr' ich schnell «' 

Dich zur Stell' ; 
Ja, manche Kraft, unbewusst 
Schlummert uns in der Brust ! $! 

Ja, das Leid 

Macht sich breit, |- 

Doch die Freud' t- 

Hat nie Zeit; | 

Ach, und die Jugend geht bald g- 

Wie das Bliimchen im Wald. 

Drum geschwind, | 

Holdes Kind, » 

Dass im Ernst 

Du noch lernst. f; 
Wie wohl auf freundlichen Gruss 

Passt ein feuriger Kuss ! t 

:,: Ade, ihr alteu Sorgen ! etc. :,: 



Piano Recital 
Bessie Sherman Davis 

ROBERT SCHURIG, Baritone 
ELLIS CLARK HAMMANN, at the Piano 

Griffith Hall, Ckozer Building 
1420 Chestnut Street 

Saturday Evening, November 1 8th, 189c 




V1 1 



Concert 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

OF THE 

Philadelphia Musical Academy 

AT THE HALL, 161 7 Spruce Street 

Saturday, December 9, 1899 



Beethoven 
Tschaikowsky 



a Vocal f a Call me Back Det, 

4. v i_<u 1 & The Rosary ft ei 

Mr. Poweix G. Fithian 

c Piiinn q^li J a Liebestraum Li. 

5. 1 iano faoli | b Va , se A flat ChQ} 

Miss Lidie Fischer Corbin 

6. Violin Concerto in G minor Bn, 

Mr. Carl Doell 

7. Vocal— Song of the Nautch Girl De Kov 

' Miss. Lottie Garrison 

8. Sonata for Piano and Violin op. 7 Catnille W. Zecku 

a Allegro Vivace. 6 Intermezzo, c Hunrjresque. 



¥ 



476th Concert 

GIVEN BY PUPILS OF THE 

Philadelphia Musical Academy 

AT THEIR HALL, 1617 Spruce Street 

Tuesday Evening, Dec. 12, 

AT EIGHT O'CLOCK 



,i Sol.laU-n Braut 
b Marienwuermchen 

Miss E. Nachoe 



Miss F. Doris 



6. Satiate op. 14 (s 



Bach 

Rubinstein 

Hille 

Beethoven 



Mr. Allen C. Hinckley 



Brahms 



Miss L. Lae 
Piano Valse Impromptu 



Liszt 

Ixosi'nhaiu 
Beethoven 



Two Quartettes ' I i" '"-"'"P 
M t b Spring bong 

Mrs. Rosenthal. Misses Painter, Cully, 

Messrs Mac Gkhean, Phillips, and Hi 



Schumann 
Ft us ut 1 
Tracy, 
xkley 



fo 



Program 



i. Grillen ....... 

2. Impromptu, op. 36 I 

3. Scherzo (B flat minor) / 

Miss Davis 

4. a — In Summer Fields .... 
b — Murmuring Breezes 

Mr. Schurig 

5. Prelude, from op. 10 1 

6. Novelette, op. 46, No. 1 J 

7. Marchen ...... 

8. Liebeswalzer op. 57 ... 

Miss Davis 

9. a^Tears of Joy .... 
b — The Dew is Sparkling 

Mr. Schurig 
10. Concert Stiick ....... 

Miss Davis 

During the performance the doors will remain closed 



Schumann 
Chopin 

Brahms 
Jensen 

MacDozvclI 

Raff 
Moszkotvski 

, Schumann 
Rubinstein 

Weber 



476th Concert 



I'.V I'D PI LS OF Till 



Philadelphia Musical Academy 

AT THLIR HALL, 1617 Spruce Street 

Tuesday Evening, Dec. 12, 



\J EIGHT O'CLOCK 



I a Soldaten Braut 
I A Marienwuennchen 

Miss E. Nachod 



K.inienol Ost 



Miss F. Dori: 



Violin Solo Boler 



op. 14 (second movement) 
Miss L. Lake 



Mr. Allen C. Hi 



h'uhinstent 

Hille 

Beethoven 

Brahms 



I a Volkslied 

\ b Still wie die Nacht 

Miss L. Lake 



Two Quartettes \ « £» Ma J ,Cii P 
I. * Spring Song 

Mrs. Rosenthal, Missbs Painter, 

Messrs Mac Gehean, Phillips. 



Liszt 
Rosenhain 

Beethoven 
Schumann 



f * 






477th Concert 

GIVEN BY PUPILS OF THE 

Philadelphia Musical Academy 

AT THEIR HALL, 1617 Spruce Street 

Saturday Evening;, Dec. 16, 



AT EIGHT O'CLOCK 






Programme 




Piano Sonate in D 

Miss M. Watson 




Haydn 


Piano— The Maiden's Song 

Miss H. Brendlinger 


my, 


-Helmund 


1 a Des Abends 
Piano 1 b GriUen 

Miss S. Gilbert 




Schumann 


„ . \a Bv the Sea 

x ocal 1 b Faith in Spring 

MR. J. Mac Gehean 




Schubert 


Piano— Reve Angelique 

Miss M. Mills 




Rubinstein 


i:»;r,„n — «^nirpe de Vienne 


Schubert-Liszt 



. \ a Art Sleeping, My Maiden. 1 

x '"' 11 , /, Murmuiing I'.reezes I 

Miss A. Turner 



) a Das Wirthshans 
Vocal > b A Dream 

Miss F. Bauer 


Schubert 
Barliett 


Piano Ballade 

Mr. H. Welch 


Grieg 


Piano— Polish Dance 

Mr. M. Stafford 


Scharwenk'a 


Vocal— Recitative and Aria from Ernani 

Mrs. M. Rosenthal 


I -erdi ' 


Piano— Liebestraueme Nr. 3 

Miss J. Calhoun 


Liszt 


Piano— Variations "Nel cor piu" 

Miss R. Thomas 


Beethoven 


p; mo— Invitation to the Dance 

MR. F. Storer 
Piano— Impromptu 

Miss E. Funk 


Weber 
Reinhold 


piano Sonate op. 7 Menuetto 

Mr. E. Crothers 


Grieg 


Piano— Rondo Capriccio 

Miss C. Meile 


Mendelssohn 


Piano— Two Etudes 

Mr. W. Heider 


Chopin 


Piano— Fantasie Impromptu 

Miss A. Gause 


Chop,,, 


Piano— Ouarlelte Peer Gyut 

, Morning b \sa's Death (0 


Grieg 
^nita Dance 



, c. Qointin S. Rosen, C. Meile, B. oesthfimvk 

„ 1 .'been furnished liv N Sll-TSOK, liug Chestnut 



H'i\ 



n 



„? tr y/,7 ,>JL4 
J,.-J7 Qfawce fMeeA 



r 











477*^ Concert 


GIVEN BY PUPILS OF TH 


E 


Philadelphia Musical Academy 


AT THEIR HALL, 1617 Spruce 


Street 


Saturday Evening-, Dec. 16, 


AT EIGHT O'CLOCK 




Programme 


Piano Sonate in D 

Miss M. Watson 


Haydn 


Piano — The Maiden's Song 

Miss H. Brendlixger 


Meyer-Helmund 


p . ) a Des Abends 
nano I b Grillen 

Miss S. Gilbert 


Schumann 


, 1 a Bv the Sea 
X ocal \ b Faith in Spring 

Mr. J. Mac Gehean 


Schubert 


Piano— Reve Angelique 

Miss M. Mills 


Rubinstein 


Piano— Soiree de Vienne 

Miss M. Cullkv 


Schubert-Liszt 


. \a Art Sleeping. Mv Maiden? 1 

^ ocal , b MunnuriuglWzes I 

Miss A. Turner 


Jensen 


Piano Duet — From Foreign Parts 

Misses M. Guillermixe, F. 


Moszkowski 


riano— Araheske 

Miss M. Van Gunten 


Schumann 


, j a Das Wirthshaus 
Vocal \b A Dream 

Miss F. Bauer 


Schubert 
Bartielt 


Piano Ballade 

Mr. H. Welch 


Grieg 


Piano— Polish Dance 

Mr. M. Stafford 


Scharwenka 


Vocal — Recitative and Aria from Ernani 

Mrs. M. Rosenthal 


I -erdi ' 


Piano — Liebestraueme Nr. 3 

Miss J. Calhoux 


Liszt 


Piano— Variations "Nel cor phi" 

Miss R. Thomas 


Beethoven 


Pi. m. .—Invitation to the Dance 

Mr. F. Storer 


II ■ebcr 


Piano — Impromptu 

Miss E. Funk 


h'e in hold 


Piano-Sonate op. 7 Menuetto 

Mr. E. Crothers 


1,, 


Piano— Rondo Capriccio 

Miss C. Meilk 


Mendelssohn \ 


Piano— Two Etudes 

Mr. \V. Heider 


Chop,,, 


Piaim -1'anlasie Impromptu 

Miss A. Gause 


Chop,,, 


Piano— Uuartette Peer Gvnt 

11 Morning 6 Asa's Death [c 


Grieg 

Anita Dance 


Missis C. QoiKTIN S. ROSEN, C. Mi.n.i- 


B. OesThkimkr 


The Steinway Gramls have bee,, fm„i S hed l, y N. s 


ktson. 1209 Chesluut 


. 





SOX ATE— op. 47 i Kreutzer) 



programme 



Adagio sostenuto— Presto. 
Andante con variaziohi. 
Finale — Presto. 



PIANO— a. Nocturne op. 15, No. 2 i 

b. Ballade No. 2 > 

c. Sonate Tragica, second movement 

d. Yalse Caprice . ■ 

VIOLIN— a. Ciaccona 

b. Ungarische Tanze 



VOCAL— a. Loreley 

b. Jasminenstrauch 

c. Saengers Trost 



Chopin 

MacDowell 
Rubinstein 



. Bach 
ahms-Joachim 



PIANO— a. Moonshine (_ 
The Brook ' 

b. Invitation to the Dance 

c. Rhapsodie No. 12 . 

VIOLIN— a. Sarabanda I 
Bourree I 

b. Andante (from Concerto) 

c. Polonaise No. 2 

d. Perpetuum Mobile 

e. Farfalla . 

VOCAL— Archibald Douglas . 
SUITE— No. 1, in E minor 



MacDowell 

Weber- 1 

Liszt 

Bach 

Mendelsohn 
Wieni 

Rics 
Saurette 



Loe e 

Camille W. Zecfcwer 



Preludium Adagio 
Scherzo-vivace 
Andante con moto 
Furiant-molto vivace 
CAMILLE W. ZECKWER and HOWARD F. RATTAY. 



STEINWAY PIANO USED. 




ARE NOW 
REHEARSING 



Cbe 



Messiah 



TO BE GIVEN EARLY IN THE 
SPRING OF 1900. 



corttf. J. 

Ml 8lar|e\ 
waslne piano ! 
heaol to advant. 
all differing wi 
with fine effec 
H'enieft, Perry,,' 
and . MoszkowskY 
Interpreted and she appc„ 
facile in all. Her work had thl 
of the true artist. Her exprt... 
preceding the beautiful "Aeolienne, 
was nicely given. 

H. T. Moulton, of Philadelphia, sang 
two well-known bass solos, "O God 
have mercy" from Mendelssohn's "St. 
Paul" and "Honor and Arms" from 
Handel's "Samson." Mr. Moulton's 
voice has great natural beauty and 
power, which is supplemented by stud- 
was ever heard here, and Mr. Moulton 
sang the songs very expressively. 

Miss Elsie North, of Philadelphia, 
made friends instantaneously with her 
beautiful soprano in rendering three 
solos, Henschell's "Spring;" Foote's 
"Irish Folk-song," and an Aria from 
Verdi's "Traviata." Her voice has 
great purity of tone. Her enunciation 
was clear and she surmounted the most 
difficult Stumbling blocks of the 
sages with ease. Her rendition of 
"Traviata" Aria was so well done that 
the audience applauded vigorously. 

Thomas a'Becket accompanied on the 
piano with good judgment. 

ORGAN CONCERT. 

The evening event was an organ con- 
cert in St. John's Lutheran Church, of 
which C. A. Marks, President of the 
Association, is organist. The church 
was crowded. The auditorium was 
still in its beautiful Christmas garb of 
greens with electric lights studding the 
miniature forest of spruce in the altar 
recess. Some of Philadelphia's ablest 
church organists were heard last even- 
ing, including Alfred W. Geiser, Fred- 
erick Maxson, David E. Crozier, and 
Wiiliam Stansfield, Dr. Clarke accom- 
panying the soloists on thl pipe organ. 
These able musicians gave the audi- 
ence an idea of the capabilities of such 
a magnificent pipe organ as St. John's 
Church possesses. They rendered selec- 
by Guilmant, West. Hollins, Bee- 
»n, Martine, Whiting, Saint Saens 
Best. The soprano soloist was Miss 
Ada Radcliffe, of Philadelphia, who 






stlyi 



Haydn's "With Verdure Clad" and 
Gounod's "Hold Thou My Hand." Chas. 

Jraf, of Philadelphia, baritone, 
charmed all with his superb rendering 

"Confutatis" from Verdi's Manzoni 
Requiem. Dr. Carl Dufft had sung the 

e solo when the Allentown Ora- 

3 Society presented the Requiem. 
Mr. Graf suffers nothing by the com- 
parison. He sang the selection with 
good judgment and in fine voice. 
RECEPTION. 

le Euterpean Club and Allentown 
Oratorio Society gave a reception 

South Seventh street. The decorating 
mittee had suspended festoons of 
laurel from the ceiling and on the 
walls and just within the doors were 
the initials, "P. S. M. T. A." The pro- 
vender committee had not been idle. 
All were regaled with cake, ice cream 
and coffee, served deftly by young 
ladies of the Oratorio Society. The en- 
tertainment committee presented Miss 
Ellen J. Mohr to welcome the associa- 
which she did with an admirable 



^lentow £pI^hu^s D ay. decembeb 



€tfg Sic 




EMBER 28. 1899. 



HAVING A GOOD TIME. 



State Music Teachers' 
Association. 



BUSINESS,CQNCERTS,RECEPTIO!t 



Capable Artists Appearing Befor 



ivention— Pic 



Time at the 



Reception Last Evening. 

The Pennsylvania State 
Teachers' Association is havir 
joyable and profitable conv* 
Allentown at present. It is a 
ous round of business, music a 
ure. The members will carfy h 
them many indelible and plea 
ollections of a happy and 
meeting. They struck no fro 
lentown. Upon the 
right hand of fellowship 
extended and grasped an 

hospitality. The faces o 



.!>.:■: 



The P. S. M. T 
"Simphunny" 
yielded kindly 
several selectic 
night before th 



receptit- 
end, after a very pleas- 
hosts and quests. i 
There was another ses) 
noon, when Rich; 
of the Philadelp] 



They have 
been made to feel welcome. They have 
met many of our music loving people 
and these are doing all in their power 
to give their guests a pleasant time. 

Yesterday at 2.15 P. M. in the Lyric 
Theatre, Dr. Hugh A. Clarke, of Phila- 
delphia, Professor of the Science of 
Music at the University of Pennsyl- 
vania, gave his lecture on "The Origin 
and Meaning of Form in Music." The 
address was, of course, not intended as 
a popular one, being addressed more 
especially to music teachers. It was 
largely technical and was replete with 
I value to the members of the assoeia- 
' tion. Dr. Clarke is a man of distin- 
guished presence on the platform, has gave an j 
a taking delivery and is thoroughly ra phy 
wrapt up in his art. His address was 
listened to with rapt attention. 

A vocal and instrumental concert 
followed at 3 P. M. and the several 
hundred people present heard an ad- 
mirable program. The Association has 
e happy faculty of getting the best 
lent In the State for its concerts, the 
rformers volunteering their service 6 . 
■pr 0| ) x \ 
»jeflts in singing or playing andjj 
flming under these conditions, jeo 
•p^es are given or expec -su^U 

,-as warm and encr.ui^ Bpu3nS 3p | pua SUJJP 
bestowed on eacrj u ^ .^^pul 
.aerogram pji» .'* 1B 3 3.teu.3 



ed Gilchi 
called th- 



i speech, in whic 
it, a'Becket and 
Oratorio Society 
Warblers and she gave a 
of the association's initial 
send me to Allentown." 
Schuler recited a piece ap 

Then the Eu'terpean's "Sin 
kester" was whistled toge 
nor Tomasso e'Bechtel, P. 
appeared himself respler 



re as a medallist. 
Lrditi, Sorrentino 
ith Tomasso, etc 
ted the stepladd 

by candlelight, a 
play. Such musi 
It all but threw 
T. A. into hysterics. Pian 
violin, accordeon, bones, t 
motley array of instrumi 
most pass human unders 
used. Raucous cacopho. 
chief feature of the "rr 
band played until the the 
gave out and then tti 
chin music. "Poet an 
"Way Down Upon the Si 
and "America" were mi 
way that all but called fo 
of the Coroner, the Dist 
and Sheriff. But it was 





1. Stn-luh, Mi! 



band! 



^vy^^w.*^^ 






.„ *"!*KU SS $i 

~o* n ^oxou 4 



J. Flore' 






•mi Mo, 



S " }o a SBa , 



r^qj 






- in 






ve beeo heard by every 

sr in tbe city. 

Jiofttioas point to a lar** 



oi 

: 



.& m x-„... ^ 



"I aABo n.r, • P os "PJincf <• illeotoivi 

*m«L.'"'" : l J" >■■>,„. ,,„. •'"".>.) 'mile Oi 



Tli 1 



aaa 1 3 1U , n ^",f "! POBBqj, 



noj 



rd Ze 



Aid 



:iety i 



M. a grand 

the Lyric, bri 

o a close. Th 

sing "The Bal 

and his Daughter" an 

The Beethoven String 

Zadie Tq_WS«"wUW ;1> 1* 

p«aa »«aP->« 3 »' a « 

h 

s^ua^d aicrenV 

p U B SU.ttO 



woi suo aspun 



^uuduioo .111, 
naoa.p,u*out^P«l L, 8 

, u „ MIH38I" 1 ":" : " 

.p°H,»..«..« *H 



SO. Ul» I 



H'oX 



P"|M:,.| ,', '""iBBUp,' "".'IH'IBI 

iJ„ 0B ERE £•„ ""ajo^^lta 
sat i°f pjB.u p ™ •''';" /")> Ma,,,,,, 
— ;; !A»Jwaaaa , V Cf^ « ,.„„.., 



Z ,d 



IJlKI 



. n c 



Doell. 



II"X 



•"III, 



nap; 



*<)£ ■0!cS B \ ! r || „T'fSi 



Jo p.r 



send. 

..SpoUr 

ior..(Jhopii 
3eor«e Kemp too. 

ntrnlto— "Iiu Herbst" 

••■.■■ " »: R ' Franz 

iss Llla Simpson. 

— Symphony F.spngnole.— 

onontroppo. b. Audonte. 

Carl DoitiL 

fin MightvSea" Dallbea 

itl>«*tlU&ight" 

" hhikowslty 



» B 1J ^bs So^j.. 
°Uy$.,~'" >q 'l-Sii'jq 



"!><"'H p,Ja 

'" ls s.UJii -, 
" ,0 ^ W(HU I 



■ T..v 



-Km 



J 1) Pirnoi ,,,;.„, '" J '0d 



"Plieal. I ll'JJ lj.,j,„ sv 



■••" String Qunn >. 
"■ipioilioil..iigrois«,No. 8 

•• Liazt 

>rg« Krmptnn. 

he Rimp," f u r contralto 

tiilobriat, Mua. 1 



Society. 



AH,- 




^ 



M 



s 







' "° ~ 1 2 "5 ?5'2.2 H ?o , ;;a aco 



Jflamiscrtpt Plustc &ocietg 
of ipbilabelpbia 

mtntb 5eason 
UbtrO private Reeling 

IMle&nes&ap. Evening, Januarp, 17, 1900 

Hbe ©rpbeus Club TRoome, JSaftec DButlDtnfl 
1520 Cbestnut Street 

at elgbt fifteen 



fto. 



'^J£&«*~'' *-/cc#m/ 


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Qzedemtt &4&ui<& 


ibw 


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iZftewcevt/' *&>. £yi<ft/au$ 


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We^e&c/ay, January M# /«,enty-/„«y//?, 




«/ ey/?t «'ed*4 




0>/'r'/ff(/fifi/?tVt .y/fuMca/' £xcat/e»iu$ 




4047 Qfimce> Q^/ree/. 





Iprogramme. 



— y-y—t—i — 

SONATE— op. 45, C minor Grieg 

Allegro molto ed appassionato. 
Allegretto espressivo alia Romanza. 
Allegro animato. 

PIANO— Impromptu, op. 142, No. 8 Schubert 

Marionettes MacDowell 

1. Soubrette. 

2. Lover. 

3. Villain. 

4. Lady-love. 

Two Etudes op. 25, No. 9 ; op. 10, No. 3 { 
Polonaise op. 53, ' 



Chopin 



VIOLIN— Prelude and Fugue, A minor Bach 

Sonate (The Tomb), . . Jean Marie LeClair 

Spanish Dance (Zapateado), . . . Sarasarte 

SUITE— Op. 99, Philipp Scharwenka 

Ballade. 

Recitativ und Tarantella. 






Tickets SO cents, 



STEINWAY PIANO USED. 



^ 



program 

Bnoante for Diolin ano piano 

a. /Dbailett Zellnet 



piano Solos 



Usaac JBarton 



a. Nocturne 

b. Novellette 

c. Mazurka 
DR. BARTON 



SonQS Camille Zecfcwer 

a. Thou art like unto a flower 

b. A Catalogue 

c. My Love 

d. It was a lover and his lass 

MISS LOTTIE GARRISON 
MR. ZECKWER 



BMano Solos 



TOtlllam 1R. Stobbc 



a. Song without Words 
6. Album Leaf 
c. Valse 
MR. MAURITS LEEFSON 



Songs .... ©aviO EOgar Greater 

a. Loves comes back to his vacant dwelling 

b. Rose, that wast born in the morning 

c. Primrose Time 

MR. HARRY B. GURNEY 
MR. CROZIER 



Qulntett for piano ano Strings 

m. m. ©ilebriet 

THE BEETHOVEN QUARTETT 
MR. MAURITS LEEFSON 



The piano used is a Knabb— Gimbel Brothers, Agent- 



^n. 



© 










IproGvantme. 



SONATE-up. 45, C minor Grieg 

Allegro molto ed appassionato. 
Allegretto espressivo alia Romanza. 
Allegro animato. 

PIANO— Impromptu, op. 142, No. 3 Schubert 

Marionettes, MacDowell 

1. Soubrette. 

2. Lover. 

3. Villain. 

4. Lady-love. 

Two Etudes op. 25, No. !> ; up. 10, No. 3 I „, . 

„ , • -., i . Chopin 

Polonaise op. o3, ' 

VIOLIN— Prelude and Fugue, A minor Bach 

Sonate (The Tomb), . . . Jean Marie LeClair 

Spanish Dance (Zapateado), . . Sai.isarte 

SUlTE-O p . 99, Philipp Scharwenka 

Ballade. 

Recitativ und Tarantella. 



Ticl-cets SO cents. 



/ . 



TEINWAY PIANO USED. 



H> 



M 



n- 



First Teachers Concert 

OF THE 

Germantown 'Branch 
(Philadelphia Musical eAcademy 

Friday Evening, January 26th, J 900 

AT 8 75 P. M. 

At Association Hall, cMain and Rittenhouse Sts., 
Germantown 



Fifteen 
Symphony 
Concerts 



THIRD SEASON 
1899-J900 




builder^ 
...Orchestra 



HENRY GORDON THUNDER, Conductor. 

..♦Witherspoon Hall.. 

on the following 

FRIDAY AFTERNOONS AT 3.30 P. M. 



PROGRAMME 

ianos. (a) Valse Carnaval ClmwmjJc 

(b) Pas des Cymbales, Ckamvudt 

* Messrs. C. W. Zeckwet and F. E. Cresson 

ndante, lb) Finale from Concerto SMmdtbsolm 

Mr. Howard Rattay 

ibald Douglas •■_ Umt 

Miss Marie Budinger 

r ,,. F. Henselt 

ipos D Amour 

.lonaise, H major F. Us, 

Mr. Wassili Leps 

IVittiijuski 

Mr. Howard Rattay 

Spring Sons Sck " ma "" 

Love Thee, Gr "S 

Miss Marie Budinger 

o and Violin. E minor CamiU, IV. Z«W 

Preludium 

Scherzo 

Intermezzo 
i Furiant 

Messrs. C. W. Zeckwer and H. Rattay 

STEINWAY PIANOS USEO. 

■ illness of Mr. Cresson, Mr. Rich. Zeckwer has kindly consented to 
parts. 



Seventh Concert, Friday, February 2d 



Soloist, Richard Zeckwer, Piano. 



First Teachers' Concert 

OF THE 

Germantown 'Branch 
Philadelphia Musical cAcademy 

Friday Evening, January 26th, 1900 

AT 8.15 P. M. 

At Association Hall, cMain and Rittenhouse Sts., 
Germantoivn 



PROGRAMME 



DUO for two Pianos, (a) Valse Carnaval Chaminade 

(b) Pas des Cymbales, Chaminade 

* Messrs. C. W. Zeckwer and F. E. Cresson 

VIOLIN, (a) Andante, (b) Finale from Concerto (Mendelssohn 

Mr. Howard Rattay 

VOCAL. Archibald Douglas Loewe 

Miss Marie Budinger 

PIANO, (a) Repos D'Amour F. Henselt 

(b) Polonaise, E major F. Lis^t 

Mr. Wassili Leps 

VIOLIN. Polonaise Wieniawski 

Mr. Howard Rattay 

VOCAL, (a) Spring Song, Schumann 

(b) I Love Thee, Greig 

Miss Marie Budinger 

SUITE for Piano and Violin. E minor Camille IV. Zeckwer 

(a) Preludium 

(b) Scherzo 

(c) Intermezzo 

(d) Furiant 

Messrs. C. W. Zeckwer and H. Rattay 

STEINWAY PIANOS USED. 

* Owing to the illness of Mr. Cresson, Mr. Rich. Zeckwer has kindly consented to 
take his parts. 




Both old and new. 

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the highest musical 

value 

Our strings are not to be surpassed, 
and lor price unequalled. 

Quality First. Price Next. 

MANDOLINS, GUITARS, BANJOS. 
Everything Musical at 

1710 
CHESTNUT ST. 



Fischer's, 



Kranich & Baches ^ 

"D^I^tt Thispiauois without ex- 

JDcLDy ception the true piano of 

Grand \ 






preciate its wonderful artis- 
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famous Kranich & Bach ex- 
built many pianos and have 



I'ed well-merited success with them all, 
but in this, tlieir Haby Grand, as well as the 
Upright, they rise to the supreme height of 
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and rose woods. Prices and terms will at- 
tract your attention. 

G HERZBERG 

906-908 ARCH ST. 



Philadelphia Musical Academy 

J6J7 SPRUCE ST., Philadelphia 



MAIN ST., Germantown 
THIRTY-FIRST SEASON 

Terms, $7.50-$35 



THE OLDEST SUCCESSFUL SCHOOL OF MUSIC 
Private and Class Lessons in all Branches of Music 

....INSTRUCTORS... 

PIANO-R. Zeckwer, R, Heuuig, C. Samaiis, L. Howe 
Zeikwer, Ainu- l.ach.-nimi-, \i IS ms Sown-, Sutor Tiers' 
Corbin, Mohr, Mrs. J. Tiers 
mr .„ „ .JANKO I'IANO-L. Howe. SIGHT SINGING-R. Zeckwer. 
h m ' ,• ■•■','.',, ,"",'' ■• tuw ""■ '•■ u "^- VIOUN-Carl Doell, Howard Rattay. 

VIOI,ONC^BIiI,C!-R.Hennig. VOC^-Ca.l : ■!,„ , ,, m , , i,„ , u, u , „i,„„i 

1 HHORY-R. Zeckwer, F. Cresson, C. Zeckwer. ACUSTICS—R. Zeckwer. 

Teachers' and Pupils' Concerts in our own Concert Hall. 

Hook & Hastings Church Organ, blown by Electric Motor. 
For Illustrated Circulars apply to RICH. ZECKWER, Director. 



Pianos 



Franklin 



Meredith 



Mason& Hamlin 
J. & C. Fischer 



Fine Tuning of Pianos 

May be relied upon. 

Pianos taken in exchange and full 

value given for them. 

FISCHER'S, 1710 CHESTNUT STREET 



th e 






BUMl! 



BEST 



L 



Leefson-Hille Conservatory of Music 

1524 CHESTNUT ST., Weightman Building;, Philadelphia 

FACULTY AND BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION 

PTAIVTO /Maurits Leefson, Frederick Linde, Miss Selma 

t-lAiNU \KaTzenstein, MiSS Jessie Fui/WEILER, and assistants 

Virgil Practice Clavier MISS Selma KaTzenstein 

Violin and Viola Gustav Hihk, Julius Fai,k, Miss Gertrude Keppelman 

Vocal Mrs. E. Aline Osgood Dexter 

Theory, Composition and Orchestration Gustav HiixE 

Violoncello W. Wells (From the Royal Music School of Wuerzburg) 

Organ Henry Gordon Thunder 

Flute Martin Stobbe 

Sight Singing, Score-Reading and Symphony Classes .... Maurits Leefson 

Orchestra and Ensemble Classes GUSTAV Hii,i,h 

Orchestra, Harmony, Ensemble, Symphony and Score-Reading Classes Free to Students of the 
Conservatory, Catalogues upon application to the Secretary. 



PROGRAMME—FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 2 



Overture, " Ruy Bias," Mendelssohn 

Concerto, D minor Mozart 

a. Allegro. 

b. Romanza. 

c. Rondo. 
Cadenzas by C. Reinecke. 
Mr. Zeckwer. 
(Steinway Piano used.) 

Programme continued on next page. 



The New 

Book 

Store 



Is one of the most commodious and 
attractive book-stores in the city. Book- 
lovers and book-buyers are welcome, 
and every effort will be made to min- 
ister to their tastes. A carefully-selected 
stock of books from the lists of both 
American and English publishers is 
offered in all departments of literature. 

RELIGIOUS PUBLICATIONS, BOOKS 

FOR CHILDREN, VOLUMES FOR 

THE SUNDAY-SCHOOL LIBRARY, BOOKS 

OF HISTORY, TRAVEL, POETRY, 

ADVENTURE, FICTION, etc. 

THE PRESBYTERIAN BOOK STORE 

the Witherspoon Building WALNUT AND JUNIPER STREETS 



READ::: 



THE 



EVENING 
—STAR 



ONE CENT 




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A Hnudsome Photo E r» 

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BORSCH'S PATENT BIFOCAL 

Lenses are the acme of perfection in 
lens grinding. 

OR© 

If you wear bifocals or two pairs of 
glasses call and we will be pleased to 
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Prompt Service. 

Best Workmanship. 
A new line of Lemaire and Jena 

Opera Glasses. 
Shell, Silver and Gold Lorgnettes. 

J. L. Borsch & Co. manufacturing 

— . OPTICIAN 

1324 Walnut Street 

Opposite Witherspoou Buildhig 



Printings 



That is Pleasing 



NEAT 

ATTRACTIVE 

UP-TO-DATE 



Harry A* Palmer Co. 

1321 Arch Street 



TEINWAY PIANOS 



These superb instruments have won their reputation by triumphs 
in every civilized quarter of the globe. The Stein way Piano occupies 
the same prominent position in England, Germany, Russia, Italy, 
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of the finest Steinways ever made are 011 exhibition in our Salesrooms. 

VISITORS ALWAYS WELCOME^- 

N. STETSON & CO. 

1111 CHESTNUT ST. 



PROGRAMME— Continued. 

Symphony, Op. 26. " Country Wedding," Goldmark 

a. Wedding March. Variations. 

b. Bridesong. Allegretto. 

c. Serenade. Allegro Moderato. 

d. In the Garden. Andante. 

e. Dance. Allegro Molto. 



SOLOISTS . 



CONSTANTIN VON STERNBERG, PtailO. 

MauriTS L-EEFSON, Piano. 
George S. Kempton, Piano. 
Richard Zeckwer, Piano. 
Camille Zeckwer, Piano. 
Edwin A. Brill, Violin. 
Gostav HlLLE, Violin. 
Carl Doell, Violin. 



Marie K. Zimmerman, Soprano. 
Jennie E. Foell, Soprano. 
Kathryn C. McGuckin, Alto. 
John F. Braon, Tenor. 
Frank G. Cauffman, Baritone. 
Philip Dalmas, Baritone. 
W. J. Ringeisen, Bass. 
Nicholas Douty, Tenor. 



Progr 



re for February 9U1 on next page. 



€$tcy 



SEND FOR CATALOGUES, 
PRICES and TERMS 



The name "ESTEY" on either 
Organ or Piano is a positive guarantee 
that the instrument will give LIFE- 
LONG satisfaction. 

Estey Pianos, $350 to $ 1 000 

Other Makes, 250 to 400 

Estey Organs, 30 to 1000 

Used Pianos, 50 and up. 



Estey Piano and Organ Warerooms, 



Pianos and Pedal Organs to Rent. 



1207 CHESTNUT STREET 



To Anyone 

About to Get a Piano 

Your determination to have a piano was not 
reached suddenly. Nobody's ever is. 

But it is finally settled. 

And, perhaps, at this moment you are antici- 
pating that perfect satisfaction afforded by the 
possession of an artistic piano. 

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Blasius will meet your fondest desires. 

I he Blasius is a permanent success. A half 
century of sharp competition has told in its 
favor ; has proven its staying- qualities. 

The Blasius is not a cheap piano, but it is 
the cheapest piano in the sense that best is 
cheapest. The Blasius is a purchase for a life- 
time. It is made to last. 

Would it not be well for you to see this 
Blasius Piano? In our warerooms you are 
always privileged to look freely 



3 



1101, 1103, 1119 Chestnut St. 

Largest Piano House in America Pianos Rented Pianos Tuned 



The Particular 
People 

Who want their linen 
well cared for with a 
Domestic Finish should 
have it sent to the . . . 



Troy 



STEAM 



Laundry_ 



i323 HRCH STREET 

Corner of Juniper Street 



Phone 3-32-10 



Estate of OLIVER K. REED 



PROGRAMME FOR FEBRUARY 9 



Soloist, Wm. J. Ringeisen, Bass. 

Symphony No. 8. B~*am 

" Hear me ye winds and waves," Haendel 

Two melodies for string orchestra Gri 

Mephistophele's Serenade from "Damnation of Faust," Berlio? 
Overture, "Sappho," ^^ 



PRICE OF TlCKETS-Season, *.«, ; Package of five Admissfon 
Tickets, fi. 5 o. Single Admission Ticket, 35 cents. (The two front rows of 
the balcony and parquet circle and several of the parquets rows have been 
reserved at the following rates): Season Reserved Seat, *6.oo ; Single Re- 
served Seat, 50 cents. 

Box Office at W. H. Boner & Co., i 4 i 9 Chestnut St., and after . P. M. on 
concert days at Witherspoon Hall. 



H^ Mr 10 



If 



Co ncert <* <* <* 

. . . GIVEN BY THE . . . 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

OF THE 

Philadelphia Musical Academy 

SATURDAY EVENING, FEB. 10, 

AT EIGHT O'CLOCK 

...PROGRAMME... 



Piano Duo— Rondo Briixante, 



. . . Herm. Mohr 
Misses Anna E. Shill and Elsa . 
Vocal— Hindoo Song, 



Bamberg 
Mr. Edward H. Irwin 

Piano Solo-a) The Violet, Mozart-Kullak 

b) Arabesque btieM 

Miss Hilda Barry Wells 

Violin-SWEDISH Fantasie, Camille IV. Zeckwer 

Mr. Howard F. Rattay 

Vocal— Heart's Delight Gilchrist 

Miss Lily Jones 



Piano Concerto in D minor, 



Mozart 



Mr. Richard Zeckwer 

Violin— a) Farfalla Saurei 

b) Spanish Dance (Zapeteoda) Sarasate 

Mr. Rattay 

Vocal-a) So Bum Thine Eyes, Douty 

b) AT Parting Nevin 

Mr. Irwin 
Piano Quartette— Entr'acte de Don Cesar de Bazan, 

Massenet 
Misses B. Davis, A. Sutor, E. Mohr, A. Shill 

steinway pianos used. 



7 



-#. 



/ 



m 



Manuscript fttusic g>octetg 

of pbilaoelpbia 



TRlntb Season 
ffourtb private ilbeeting 



"GCleonesoap. Evening, jFebruars 21, 1900 

Gbe Orpbeus Club IRoomg, JBaftet JSutlOtng 

1520 Cbestnut Street 

at eigbt flfttcn 






286th CONCERT 

GIVEN BY PUPILS OF THE 

PHILADELPHIA MUSICAL ACADEMY 

AT THEIR HALL, 1617 SPRUCE ST., 
Monday Evening, Feb. 26th, COO, at 8 o'clock 



Programme 

i String Quartette, No. 6 Haydn 

a Allegro 6 Adagio c Mimietto d Presto 
Misses A. Greims, A. B ker, 

Mr. S. Laeiar, Marie Brehm 

. Piano Solo { ^o a Wild Rose [ ^^ 

Miss M . Parker 

3 Violin Solo — Klegie Ernst 

Mr. L. Freeman 

4 Vocal— Jewell Song Gounod 

Miss S. Harlan 

5 Piano Solo — Impromptu Reinhold 

Miss E. Funk 

a Adagio from Concerto _ 

6 Violin Soli ? minor B T y lc , h 

b Bourree Bach 

Miss A. Greims 

7 Vocal — Erlking 

M. A. Hinkley 

8 Piano Solo — Ballade 

Mr. H. Welsh 



Schubert 
Greig 

Svendsen 
Verdi 



9 Violin Solo — Romance 

Miss A. S. Baker 

io Vocal — Quartette from Rigoletto 

Mrs. E. Rosenthal, Miss M. Culley, 
Messrs. J. Mat. Geahau, and E. Luckenbach 

i. Violoncello Soli j « The Lament I Gabriel Marie 
( h Capriccio J Gol erman 

Marie Brehm 

12 Violin Solo — Concerto No. 2 Spohr 

Mr. O. Wittig 

t 3 Piano Solo \ a . Invention \ Bach 

I b Impromptu e flat | Schubert 

Miss E. McCrilles 

C a Flirtation Steck 

14 String Orchestra - b First Meeting } 

( c Loves Appeal 1 Krug 



program 

Sonata for Diolin ano piano 

©pus 7. Camtlle TPa. Ziecftwer 

a. Allegro Vivace 

b. Intermezzo 

c. Humoresque 

d. Saltarello 



Songs 

a. The Half Ring Moon— A. Mailert Zellner 

b. Forgetfulness— Nicholas Douty 

c. The Rose— Russell King Milller 

MR. NICHOLAS DOUTY 
MR. RUSSELL KING MILLER 

xrwo pieces for Diolin ano piano 



I. Romance 
>. Folk Dance 
FREDERICK HAHN 
MR. DEWEY 



ffer&tnano Sfewev 



Song, " flntrospection," for Baritone, 
IDfolin, Violoncello ano piano 

afranft ©. Cauffman 



MR. CAUFFMAN 

MR. FREDERICK. HAHN 

MR. STANLEY CAUFFMAN 

MR. RUSSELL KING MILLER 



SEmpbonlc Variations on an ©riginal 
Ubeme,for TTwo pianos 

IBenrg ai&ert Hang 



MR. JOHN W, POMMER 
MR. LANG 



286th CONCERT 

GIVEN BY PUPILS Ol I HI 

PHILADELPHIA MUSICAL ACADEMY 

AT THEIR HALL, 1617 SPRUCE ST., 
Monday Evening, Feb. 26th, 1900, at 8 o'clock 

Programme 

String Quartette, No. 6 Ha; 

<7 Allegro b Adagio c Minuetto d Presto 
Misses A. Greinis, A. B ker, 

Mr. S. Laciar, Marie Brehin 

\a To a Wild Rose | ^^ 

( /> Autumn ) 

Miss M . Parker 



Piauo Solo 



3 Violin Solo — Elegie 

Mr. L- Freeman 

4 Vocal — Jewell Song- 

Miss S. Harlan 

5 Piano Solo — Impromptu 

Miss E. Funk 

a Adagio from Concerto 

6 Violin Soli g minor 

b Bourree 

Miss A. Greims 

7 Vocal — Erlking 

M. A. Hinkley 

8 Piano Solo— Ballade 

Mr. H. Welsh 



Ernst 

Gounod 
Reinhold 

Bruch 
Bach 

Schubert 
Greig 

Svendsen 
Verdi 



9 Violin Solo — Romance 

Miss A. S. Baker 

10 Vocal — Quartette from Rigoletto 

Mrs. E. Rosenthal, Miss M. Culley, 
Messrs. J. Mat. Geahau, and E. Luckenbach 

,,. , 11 o 1; Ur The Lament 1 Gabriel Marie 

11 Violoncello Soli } j Capriccio J Gol.erman 

Marie Brchm 

12 Violin Solo — Concerto No. 2 Spohr 

Mr. O. Wittig 

_. Q . \ a Invention ) Bach 

13 1 lano bolo 1 b Impromptu c g at , Schubert 

Miss E. McCrilles 

I a Flirtation Steck 

14 String Orchestra - b First Meeting } 

(_c Loves Appeal | Rrug 





FIRST VIOLINS 






s A. Greims, A. S. Baker. M Jackson, I.. Keeley, 






Messrs. 0. Witlig, B. Damelio, N. Frey, R. Y 


Dung 




SECOND VIOLINS 




Misse 


s C. Heek, M. Opdyke, R. Haminerschlag. 

A. Seither, M. Zeckwer, and Mr. W. Himinels 




Mess 


s. H. Boeringer. L. Freeman, Marie Brehm 





487th CONCERT 

GIVEN BY PROFESSORS OF THE 

PHILADELPHIA MUSICAL ACADEMY 

AT THEIR HALL, 16(7 SPRUCE ST., 
Saturday Evening, March 3d. 1900, at 8 o'clock 



kl* 



Programme 

1 Trio for Piano, Violin and Violoncello Op. 

B( 
<m/s a Allegro vivace b Largo c Presto 

1 Messrs. C . Samara , C. Doell, R. Hermit 



ff 



{ a A Bunch of Violets 



Popper 



D'Hardelot 
Vocal -.' b The Rosarv Nevin 

(. c Where the Lindens Bloom Dudley Buck 

Mr. C. Schachner 

3 Violoncello— Soli— Three Carnival Pieces 

a Swan St. Saens 

b Harlequin | 
c Butterfly )' 
Mr. R. Hennig 

4 Piano Solo — Introduction and Allegro de 

Mr. Camille W Zeckwer 

5 Violin Solo. Concerto F sharp minor 

Mr. Howard Rattey 

6 Vocal — Odin's Meeresritt 

Mr. C. Schachner 

7 Piano Quartett — 1st Movement 

Messrs. C. Zeckwer, C. Doell, 
H. Rattay, R. Hennig 



C. W. Zeckwer 



The Steinway Grand i 



I 






V 



ASSEMBLY HALL OF THF oid. o 

PROGRAM 
EXERCISES AT THE 70th MEET/NG 

TUESDAV EVEN -C MARCH 6th, I90 0, 
A T 8 O'CLOCK. 
Lecturers, . . „ 

" " " {mr'h C s AR K? ZECKWER ' 

so, - o,sts ' - • - /jg- <*« sc HA cH NE r B ^ ne 

I ' Jr ELAND Ho «'E. Piano 
I Mr. Carl Doell, Violin. 

'• PIANO SOLI-— «Twn m 

,!p°, m ° Vements from Sonate.on n •• R „„ 
Polonnaise, op. 53 " P ' > * Beeth oven 

Mr. leland Howe C/ ' 0/ "'" 

2. PAPER :-»Pure Vocal Tone," 

3 SONPS Mr - H - S. K.RKLAND. 

3. SONGS:-,. " A Bunch of Violets," . 

*■ "The Rosary" " D'Hardelot 

c "Where the Linden's" bloom"" ' n „ Nevin 

■ Othello Fantasie " 

Mr. carl Doell " Ermt 

5 : / CTURE: -" Ph ^r ph -— toM UslV , 



MR. RICHARD ZECKWER.' 






Persons wishing to becom 



--«£5S£S5rSf , 5att.tr 



>W« ^._ ^"CATION FOR MEMBERSHIP. 

p H , , . -, „, T ° THE SECRETARY OF THE ""^ ^ ""'* ^ """"^ 

™'UDEL PH , A „u SICTEACHERS . 

[PILL OUT THESE BLANKS.] «'<-M1, 

•S^ee* a»rf ^- 

Teacher of 

-» ^^wSk b, i™- — EN : Write -■- 

connected with ,he «* p--o„ ); »^ 'sat-sys ^ on ^ 

WlLUAM WOLSLWKR, .?«„,„_, . 

>3>3 Master Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 



VOCiUOSES 

Paper I^ead at Teachers' 
Meeting. 

S. KIRKLAND 



BY 

Richard Zeckwer Also Delivers 
an Address 



known as the Adam's apple. w~™ 
tion of the breath at the first threu 
points is useful, Principally^ ^ 



HrSht iv "which l mean3°that' we are abl» 
^o^ve^?^ when the breath U 

" St a ?a y r#e e ^r^th s^faily for 



> his. 



everyone of the one 
hundred" and more people wh»»tt(na- 
ed the seventieth meeting of toe Phil- 
adelphia Music Teachers' Association, 
last night, felt amply repaid for brav- 
ing the elements. 

The meeting was held in the Assem- 
bly Hall of the Girls' Normal School, 
Thirteenth and Spring Garden streets 
and the exercises included lectures D * 
Bichard Zeckwer and H. S. KlrMand, 
piano solos by Leland Howe and Miss 
Bessie Davis and songs by t^ari 
Schachner, baritone. 

That the programme was thoroughly 
enjoyed was evident by the hearty ap- 
plause given the participants. 

President Enoch Plerson opened the 
meeting with a few well chosen re- 
ks and then Leland Howe, played 
movements from "Sonate, op. 31, 
by Beethoven and Chopin's "Po on- 
naise op 63 " He displayed excellent 
technical 'ability and his touch is del- 
icate, yet at the same time, possess- 
ing the necessary power for the prop- 
er Interpretation of the compositions 

P H^ S. Klrkhead then read a paper 
on "Pure Vocal Tone," which was of 
so much interest that I print it In full. 
Mr. Klrkland has taught for over 
twelve years and spent some time 
abroad. He proved thoroughly com er- 

±£S "£ waf'des^eir £ 

oTSmoV^e^Hr.'^S;^ 
Ua to having nothing new 
to oner you. For presenting old 
thoughts in my own way I and an ex 
cuse in the words of a lecturer of my 
stSdent days: " The * in f t X, a n ™ 
o have told us are not the tmngb 

^^Sy^MnJsinpe 

teas s?g *&?"*«»«* 

Lhe teaching of vpice-cul tare b 
sgToTa 'seM^perf^ ^ 
unsuspecting victim, cond 

1 

ave to do larg.lv with 
-i^- that Is, learning 
iterlal In the right 
way nnd. therefore 
suit. -- 
chanical side of voice culture, 

,ur attention. , nr _ . , 

'Vocal tone Is either Impui" or it t, 
mire- it is dulled by superfluous breath 

liilil le'the tefms pure and ^ure 
only as indicating the absence or 
presence of superfluous Dream 



Moreover 

tie ' ' 






he erst instance, «"'-■■ 

In such Plans a 

The time can be Btartea iv , 

continued pur.e. f ™s was^ i v 
pu h rSU f d „rtYorescrlb^b5 its aescend- 
sohool and presc uw » » b well 

be way of eliciuis v«"» 
firm sounds." -.-.jieit direction tor 

l0 ^d tnUe three are one. Int^S 

ft Sf&SRU « £ worthy rfno- 

the 6 indention of a new or a personal 

m if\°er , 'calling attention to the meth- 
ods of obtaining pure tones,,Mr. Kirk- 
fand concludes by say^n| OT ^e^one 

largely removed ,^, ',S„ „o»r 
blco^e^mofe ^iffui^perftor J 
?hn?^rireleis telegraphy by which the 

ffSfe MSB 

to? "Singing is singing only when it I. 
the exp/esston of emotion. 



r £ LfcnreMnon 

. nt . : xpr ,. . 



, i hurhner, w.u - 

ba ritone. a Sa a ng t A^Bunch 



■hanical 

way, and 









breathy 



he point where t 
: righted. The lea 
>ped. But how? 



with cnarnuns 

e also rendered Ethel- 

... . 'The Rosary" and Dud- 

twW "Where the Linden 3 

Bloom "in both of which he was suc 

° Other vocalists^co^ld^lmUate Mr. 

lmer C lcan r comPOsitlSns more frequent- 

. __. k „.™rl,,hai 

for 



M?ss "Bessie Davis followed with a 
Pl f,r^v;?'a P nd y kTchar 1 d°Teckwe 3 r cTo s- 

show photography has been employed 



vocal chord 



body and pboto- 



... .. i 
. ::■' < ... , ,, .„ 






sYractlons. First ^ the ^ps^m In, 

•''" ' '''''"''^'""Ilft'nX-te'^smk 
and fount, a closure at the pom 



>vertones in our ™ 
now It demonstrated _.. 
sound waves. 

sure that the association de- 
md I call upon thosa 
* members to enroll 
j and thus assist In build* 



24= J/H" 




w Music Teachers' Associatioi 

n. It» f"'"" '""",, vml u| 



YOU 


ARE CORDIALLY INVITED TO 


BE PRESENT 


"the 


FLETCHER MUSIC 


METHOD.'- 




MISS EVELYN ASH TON FLETCHER, 




TO BE GIVEN AT 




THE PHILADELPHIA MUSICAL ACADEMY. 




1617 SPBUCE STREET. 






ON MONDAY, MARCH 12, 


1900 


The a 


m of ,h,s method ,s,o reduce, he menta, 


train which the study of 




s in the beginning and to give a fund 




logical mu 


ical education in a way that shall be 


thorough, natural and 


pleasurable 






TheF 


etcher Method has been endorsed by man 


V of the most prominent 


musicians 


f America and Europe 




This demonstration will illustrate the aims of th 


e Method. 


t. To 






a. To 


make the children familiar with time and 


evelop rhythm. 


3. To 


teach them to read music rapidly. 




4. To 


give a thorough knowledge of the key- 


oard of the pianoforte. 


chords and 






5- To 




or scales 


6. To 






7. To 


create an interest in the great masters of 


he past and present and 


\ 







I 



17 



m 



t 3/ 



^#7 



-**. 



i 



kto. 



[INVITATION TO THE 

Piano Recital 

. . . GIVEN BY. . . 

MISS LID1E FISCHER CORBIN 

WITH THE ASSISTANCE OF 

Mr. CARL DOELL, Violin 

AT THE HALL OF THE 

Philadelphia Musical Academy 

MONDAY EVENING, APRIL 2d 







AT 8.15 O'CLOCK 






..PROGRAMME... 




Piano 


la) 


Prelude 1 


Chaminade 




(*) 


Pierrette l 






M 


Scherzo, E Minor 


Mendelssohn 




(d) 


Rustle of Spring 


Sinding 


Violin 


(a) 


Adagion, from gth Concerto 


Spohr 




{&) 


Spanish Dance 


Sarasate 


Piano 


(a) 


Moment Musical 


Moszkowski 




(A) 


Novelette, E Major 


Schumann 




(«) 


Etude, C Sharp Minor 1 


Chopin 




to 


Valse, A Flat Major 1 




Violin 




Alia Polacca 


YVilhelmj 


Piano 


(a) 


Liebes Traeume 


Liszt 






Rhapsodie Hongroise, No. 6 






STEINWAY PIANOS USED. 





* 



¥9 t 



■e 7 




llt'SICALE 

Fischer's Pl\>'o Rooms 



Voir AKJE KKST'KrTFI'U.Y INVTTKn TO A 

MUSTCALE 

A ' r Fischer's j?ia:no Rooms 

Mamon * K***XV Okand 171 ° Chf-stnttt Street 

CSW> ON THIS OCCASION 

APUIL 2GTH, AT 8 P. M. 

MISS T... F. CORBIN, mso 
MAKTINUS VAN GKI/DICR, viot.ik 






PROGRAMME 



1. a. Prelude — A minor ....") 

> Chaminade 

b. Pierrette, . \ 

c. Scherzo- — E minor Mendelssohn 

d. Rustle of Spring Sinding 

2. Adoration Felix Borowski 

Martin U9 van Gelder 

3. a. Moment Musical Moszkowski 

b. Nooellette — E major Schumann 



4. a. Etude — C sharp minor 1 

\ Chopin 
b. Valse — A flat major, J 



5. Hungarian Dance Brahrns-Joachirn 

Martlnus van Gelder 



6. a. Liebestraum, 

.Liszt 
b. Rhapsodie Hongroise No. 6, 



! 



fav 





PMA 






Invitation to the 








...Organ Recital... 








GIVEN B 

Mr. Will II. 


Clci 


'fee 




CRAOUATE IN ORGAN DEPARTMENT 1900 
Cv THE PHILADELPHIA MUSICAL ACADEMY* 






m the 
Kensington 

Richmond and r 


M. 1:. Church |£fe 








Thursday Evening 
May Twenty-fourth 






AT 5 O'CLOCK 






1 POO 



2. 



^v 



tfl 



djL 



CONCERT 

GIVEN BY THE 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

OF THE 

Philadelphia Musical Academy 

1617 Spruce Street 

Saturday, April 21st, at 8 P. M. 



s a PROGRAAttE & « 

1. Piano Quartette March from "Lenore" Symphony 

Raff 
Misses Katzenstein, Davis, Mrs. Taylor, Miss Sutor. 

2. Vocal [a) Das Veilchen Mendelssohn 

{6) Berceuse from Jocelyn Godard 

Miss Irma Nachod. 

3. Piano Sou (a) Romanze op. 44 Rubinstein 

(6) Waltz, F, Major Moszkowski 

Mrs. Charles M. Taylor, Jr. 

4. Violin Solo Ballade and Polonaise Vieuxtemps 

Miss Edith Wood. 

5. Piano Duo Rondo Chopin 

Misses Bessie Davis and Adele Sutor. 

6. 'Cello Solo Adagio Bargiel 

Mr. Stanley Hart Cauffman. 

7. Concertstuck Weber 

Miss Bessie Davis. 

S. Vocal Eliland ; a poem from Chiemsee 

Alexander von Fielitz 
(a) Silent Woe 
(6) Frauenwoerth 

( c) Secret Greetings 

(d) Dreams 

( e) Anathema 
(/) Resignation 

Mr. Carl Schachner. 
9. Trio for Piano, Violin and 'Cello 

Romanze Marschner 

Misses Laura Wood, Edith Wood, Mr. Cauffman. 



Miss F.l 


zabeth Albrecht 


Mrs 


M 


D. Ancker 


Its 


E 


E. Artois 


Mrs 


A. 


Bareuther 


Mrs 


Jo 


. Butler 


Mrs 


Paul De Witt 


Mrs 


Samuel S. Ellis 


Mrs 


F. 


Hardart 


Mr- 


Frederick Fllwtn^er 


Mrs 


F. 


H. Field 


Ire 


Ro 


>ert Foerderer 


Mi- 


Mi 


tinie Gaeckler 


Mr- 


H. 


Gauler 


r- 


Jai 


les Gillespie 


'- 


Martin Grauer 


Mi - 


Jos 


Hall 


Irs 


Chs 


s Herbert Jr. 


Hi- 


Henrv F 


il: 


He 
Vic 


ry F. Heyl 

■ »,- K.Uck 


--- 


E. 


King 


.- 


Ire, 


e Kingott 


1- 


Fred. Kraiker 


rs 


Fred Ki uker. Jr. 


1- 


A Kuckuck 



fr 



rogramme 



Fuga in E Minor No. 9, Book No. 2. Bach 

Allegretto in B Flat Lemmens 

Vocal With verdure clad Haydn 

v7?iss U-ottie Sarrison 

Prelude and Fuga in C Minor Mr. Clarence D Wilson 

(Graduate in Theory) 

Caprice op. 10 Deshayes 

Fantasie op. 176 Merkel 

Vocal (a) The Lord is my light Allitsen 

[b) Spring Song Weil 

/7?/ss *C. Sarrison 



Andante Conmoto in B flat 
Grand Choeur 



Smart 
Wheeldon 



>* «• # PROGRAMME * *? *? 

i. Allegro Agitato ...... Schuman 

2. Liebestraume ... . Liszt 

3. Pollacca Brillante Weber 

EMMA WINTER 

4. Vocal Quartette ...... 

NEW CENTURY LADIES' QUARTETTE 

5. Impromptu] 

Valse ( Ch °P in 

6. Les Sylvaius Cliaminade 

7. Momento Capricieoso ..... Westerhout 

EMMA WINTER 

8. Vocal Quartette 

NEW CENTURY LADIES QUARTETTE 

9. Faust Liszt 

EMMA WINTER 

During the performance the doors will remain closed. 



4©Stn CONCERT 



IPbilabelpbia Musical Hcabem^ 

Given by Pupils of the Intermediate Department 
at their Hail, 1617 Spruce Street 

Saturday Afternoon, April 28th 



AT 2.30 



* ® PROQRAAAE • a 

QUARTETTE 

a. Arrival in the Country •, 

b. Country People Tilting at the Ring J Gurlilt 

Master A. Wow, Misses H. Richards, F. Winch 
A. Carpenter 

POLONAISE 

Miss D. Nelson 

Miss M.Blackwood BUVM 



SCHERZO . 



Miss F. Bruehl 
TRIO— Bolero 

Misses L. Elliot, F.' Nichterlein, N.' BoYi,f ''"^ 

THE FIRST BALL 

Miss K. Sciple 
DUET— Merry Making . . 

Misses E. Long, K.'mcCarev ' ' 
NORTHERN STRAINS .... 

Miss F. Gay 

LITTLE CARNIVAL 

Miss F. Winch 
QUARTETTE— March 

Misses E. Watt, a. French, B.' deLong, T.' Tabor ' 

MEADOW DANCE 

Miss R. Longenecker 

DUET-Christmas Eve 

Misses H. Haussr, E.' Bisset ' 



■ Gurlilt 

Stinnoll 

Mohr 

U i/tiauis 

. /filler 



Miss H. Richards 
DUET-Spriugrnorn . 




Misses E. Jackson, F. Bruehl 
a. Blacksmith . . 




Miss M. Parsons 
DUO-Minuett 

Master A. Wolf and Miss f! Winch 
BARCAROLLE 

Miss E. Jackson 

a. Gavotte . . 

b. Bolero ....'.'.'. 


■ ■ Mozart 

■ Gin Hani 

■ ■ Gurlilt 
■ ■ .Behr 



HUNTER'S RETURN 



Miss L. Stewart 



Master a. Wolf 

a. Birds and Blossoms 

b. Rondo of the Archers'. ' '. 

Miss M. Silberschmidt 
The Steimvay Pianos arTlTonTnt 



Stetson, Jilt Chestnul Street. 



4Q6«- CONCERT 

GIVEN BY PUPILS OF THE 

flMMlabelpbia flDustcal Hcabem^ 

at their Hall, 1617 Spruce Street 

Saturday Evening, April 28th, at 8 O'clock 

® ® PROGRAAnB & a 

DUO— Sonatine dementi 

Masters W. Braun and P. Freemann 

NOCTURNO B major Chopin 

Miss E. Grimes 

VIOLIN— Fantasie Appassionata Vieuxtemps 

Miss R. Jackson 

CONCERTO in D minor ( 2d and 3d movement . . . Mozart 

Mr. W. Golze 

a. Sonate (3d movement) op. 2 N 3 Beethoven 

b. The Brook MacDowell 

Miss Cornish 

a. Fantasie— Impromptu 1 r/mMn 

b-. Polonaise C sharp minor / Lnopm 

Miss I. McBride 

VOCAL— Air from Freischuetz Weber 

Miss M. Lynd 

VIOLET Mozart-Knflak 

Miss C. Swing 

VIOLIN— Ungarischer Tanz Papini 

Miss C. Heck 

BALLADE E flat Chopin 

Miss F. Doris 

a. Dornsoeschen Bendel 

b. Sparks Moszkowshi 

Miss H. Young 
RONDO in D Mozart 

Miss M. Trueman 
VOCAL— Aria of Rudolph Weber 

Mr. J. MacGehan 

GENFER SEE Bendel 

Mrs. J. H. Holmes 

VIOLIN— Romance Bruch 

Miss A. Baker 

L' ARGENTINE Ketterer 

Miss E. Knight 

a. NOCTURNO Chopin 

b. PIERRETTE Chaminade 

Miss R. Futhey 

a. ETUDE Chopin 

b. HARK! HARK! THE LARK .... Schubert-Liszt 

Mr. H. Welsh 

CONCERTO (2d and 3d movement) Mendelssohn 

Miss O. Pahl 



Given by Pupils of the 

[Philadelphia musical Hcabem^ 

at their Hall, ,<5, 7 Spruce Street 

Friday Evening, May 4 th, at 8 O'clock 

° ° PROQKAAAE o o 
IMPROMPTU A major 

Master w'. Brown ^ **** 

BARCAROLLE 

' m IS sm:b A r EBT n **«* 

V0CAI - b. SuL?r minsE - VeS McDowell 

,.' ' L £W&y Buck 

Miss Lueixa Lake 

VIOLIN-CONCERTO (ist movement) . 

Master B. D'Amemo 

SONATE PATHETIQUE (Adagio and Rondo) . Bcctltoven 

Mr. c. Bawden 
AIR de BALLET .... 

lwVoctTT. Chaminade 

Miss H. Brendhnger 
MOMENT MUSICALE 

Miss'c. Qd'intin SC '' Ubert 

SONATE Op. 57 (ist movement). 

MR.W.HEIBER ^^ 

CONCERTO for violin Nr > 

m'issA.'greims ■****« 

VOCAL *■ The Vow 

b. Vergebliches Staendehen '.'.'. BA 

MissL. Nachod """" 

a. Chopin . . . 

b. Norwegian Bridal" Procession ''.'.'. Godard 

Miss M. Strimpi,e ' ' ' "** 

ALBUMBLATT 

Miss M. Waters <*"*-"*« 

INVITATION TO THE DANCE 

MR. E. CROTHERS " ^^ 

RIGAUDON 

Hl32 B RNI3HT ' Raff 

VIOLIN-Concerto Nr 2d minor 

MR. O. WiTTiG BrUCk 

a. Canzonetta . . 

b - Valse Nicode 

Miss L. Smith ° Wpi " 

WALTZ BRILLANTE .... 

M ,„ l, ' ' Moszkowski 

Miss M. Walters 
SONATE in A 

Miss L. Bari,ow Mozart 

VIOLIN-Legende : 

Miss M. Opdykb Hm 

KAMENOI-Ostrow 

Mi'ss'm.Seess Ruoinstein 

a. Polonaise c sharp minor 

0. Etude Chopin 

Miss R.' Thomas Czc '" y 

"^^^^^ 



498 th CONCERT 

GIVEN BY PUPILS OF THE 

fl>bilabelpbta flfousical Hcabeinie 

at their Hall, 1617 Spruce Street 

Thursday Evening, May ioth, at 3 O'clock 

a ■ PRO(iRA?\ttE & « 

QUARTETTE— Hunting Song Schumann 

Master A. Schwartz, Misses E. Jackson, H. Fleck, F Brdehl 

a. Robin's Melody Krogmann 

b. Doll's Dance Foerster 

Miss K. Kraose 

TRIO— Cavallery March Wilhelm 

Misses C. Hein, L. Thelenberg, H. Brown 

DUET— Martha 

Misses Johnson, E. Eshelman 

THE MILL Jensen 

Miss L. Moore 

DUO Gurlitt 

Misses F. Reid, M. Bechtei, 

TRIO— Husaremnarch Gurlitt 

Misses M. Parsons, E. Jackson, F. Gay 

QUARTETTE— Overture Commedietta Gurlitt 

Misses V. Evans, C. McConnelx, L. Gaskili,, F. Avrss 

PASTORALE Hits 

Miss F. Summers 

DUET-Coquetish Smile Engelmann 

Misses A. Box, B. Parker 

nnitTBTTP a - Cradle Song Reinecke 

QUARTETTE b Rain and s ^ nshine Vogt 

Misses E. Heritage, M. Kirk, M. Search, A. Search 

BUTTERFLIES Lege 

Miss L. Whson 

DUO— Rondiuo Schults 

Misses M. Parsons, Master A. Schwartz 

THE SKYLARK Tschaikowsky 

Miss R. Eiweia 

DUET— Minstrel's Serenade Lone 

Misses B. Renninger, J. Hopper 

CRADLE SONG VanLaer 

Miss E. Eshelman 

AUSTRIAN Packer 

Master L. Wister 
GAVOTTE Durand 

MISS M. SlLBERSCHMIDT 

DUET— Premier Dauseuse Zittcrbart 

Miss M. Maulx, Mr. M. Percival 

GIPSY DANCE Behr 

Miss F. Tilunghast 

SONATINE Vogel 

Master A. Schwartz 

QUARTETTE- *g™ $™* } SaHorio 

Misses A. Kroeger, M. McGaritv, K. Frankel, E. Long 

Ths Steinway Pianos are from N. Stetson, tilt Chestnut Street. 



4Q9th CONCERT 

Given by Pupils of the Intermediate Department of Ihe 

Ipbilabelpbta flHusical Hcafccm\> 

at Griffith Hail, 1420 Chestnut Street 

Saturday Afternoon, May 12, at 2.30 O'clock 

° <s PROQRAAAE ° ° 

TRIO— Polonaise Brilliante Dietrich 

Missks E. Tustin, M. Reinhold, F. Kirk 

a. In Olden Times Wolff 

b. The Grace Wartenstein 

Master A. Schwartz 

ANITA'S DANCE Grieg 

Miss V. Evans 

MEADOW DANCE Williams 

Miss G. Brown 

DUET— Sonate Op. 6 Beethoven 

Miss E. Conway and Miss A. Brennan 

VIOLIN— Solo— 3d Meuuet He, matin 

Miss D. Simmons 

DANCE OF THE GIPSIES Lichncr 

Miss R. Weleenbach 

CHORUS— Good-bye, Happy Summer Camille Zeckwer 

A COUNTRY DANCE Bassford 

Miss E. LeBoutiixier 

HEATHER ROSE Lange 

Miss R. Whiteside 

WOODEN SHOE DANCE K'rogmann 

Miss I. Ferris 

TRIO— Bells Gounod 

Piano : Misses E. Stevenson, E. Bii dle 
Violin : Miss D. Simmons. Triangle : Master W. McClay 

VALSE Jadassohn 

Miss C. McConnell 

chorus - l<^ gSong ; ;;;;;;;;; ;;:::£% 

b'. G^?nte Chimney } ™ 

Miss L. Brown 

FAREWELL TO THE PIANO Beethoven 

Master H. Righter 

HUNTERS IN THE WOOD Wolff 

Miss J. MacGarvie 

IN THE GREEN MEADOW Mcrkel 

Miss M. Parsons 

VIOLIN SOLO— Tanzweise Hille 

Miss T. Oesterheldt 

RONDO Hunten 

Miss E. Watt 

THE SHEPHERD PIPER Bauer 

Master D. Castellucio 

TOY SYMPHONY Haydn 

Piano : Master A. Schwartz and Miss H. Fleck 

1st Violins : Master B. Damalio, Miss Mavd Obdyke 

2d Violins : Missies A. Seither, T. Oesterheldt 

Master B. Brown 

Violoncello: Master J. Zeckwer 

Nightingale : Miss E. Stevenson 

Cuckoo: Miss R. Wellenbach. Rattle: Miss F. Bkiehl 

Cymbals : Master W. McClay. Drum : Master A. Wole 

Quail : Miss E. Biddle. Triangle : Miss E. Jackson 

Bell— Tree : Miss F. Winch. Trumpet : Master D. Casteleucio 

DISTRIBUTION OF PRIZES 

The Stcinivay Pianos aro Irom N. Stetson, 1 1 1 1 ChoKuil Street. 



joo^ 



Concert 

OF THE 

Ipbilabelpbta flfeusical Bcabem^ 

Given by the 

GRADUATES OF 1^)00 
At Musical Fund Hall 

Eighth and Locust Streets 

Saturday Evening, May 26th 

AT 8 O'CLOCK 






* 



JU*Jn 0- 



m 



The I,h ^f h elphl ' ,MBsioal ^«'em 7 , 



| harm 



Prize ],-,,. 



■ -diss kis'i . 

'nation paper ■ 



Sonnakolb Piano H.citel. 



I* t. 



l the development of local orchestral 
talent awakens slowly. Series of concerts given here, devoted to 
symphonic performances, played by our own musicians, have not been 
financial successes. So little encouragement is manifested, that young 
people do not care to learn orchestral instruments in thorough, profes- 
sional fashion. 

The fact is illustrated by a bit of history brought out in connection 
with the annual graduation of pupils from the Philadelphia Musical 
Academy, an institution popularly known as Zeckwer's Conservatory. 
A while ago an effort was made to establish, as a part of the organiza- 
tion, a pupil's orchestra. So it would be possible that students should 
make due acquaintance with orchestral masterworks. In 1888 Mr. E. 
Zeckwer offered gratuitous lessons on many orchestral instruments, but 
the inducement failed to secure a class of learners. The lack seems the 
more remarkable in view of another contrasted experience. At Mrs. 
Thurber's National Conservatory in New York the number of pupils 
studying these instruments is now so large that a complete students' 
orchestra is maintained, which gives concerts of its own. 

Mr. Zeckwer, however, reiused to dispense with the study of the class 
of music referred to. He devised seven organs, having the compass and 
tone quality of seven different orchestral wind instruments. So he fur- 
nishes now competent productions of the scores of the great masters. 

The graduates of the present year gave a performance— the 500th con- 
cert of the Philadelphia Musical Academy— at Musical Fund Hall, on 
Saturday evening, the 20th ult. Announcement was made of the list of 
graduates and prize-winners, as follows: Piano graduates, Miss Eliza- 
beth Rose Knight, Henry Hunter Welsh, Mrs. W. Lawrie Stevenson, and 
Miss Florence Poriss. Organ gradual. Will H.Clarke. Theory gradu- 
ates Misses Carrie Hoffecker, Irma N.ichod, Anne H. Gledhill Jessie 
Catanach, and Helen Brendlinger, and C. D. Wilson. Teachers' certifi- 
cates (piano department), Miss Emily « Robins ; vocal department. Miss 
Irma Nachod. Zeckwer gold medal. Miss Jessie Fulweiler. Gold medal 
for best sonate in four movements, Miss Elsa Mohr. Prize for best exam- 
ination paper in harmony, Otto Wittich. 



strj 



CONCERT 



by Pupils of the 



flMMlabelpbia musical Hcabems 

at ther Hall, 1617 Spruce Street 

Thursday Evening, May i 7 th, a t 8 O'clock 



o ° PROCiRAAAE ° ° 

POLONAISE MILITAIRE 

Miss E. Newcomet 

DRAGONJFLIES 

Miss J. Black 
IMPROMPTU— a flat 

Miss I,. Lake 

POLKA DE LA REINE 

Miss E. Funk 
PIANO *■ To a Wild Rose .... 

b. At an Old Trysting Place . . .'.'.'. 
Miss M. Caveny 

VOCAL-Duet from Aida 

Misses L Garrison and L. Lake 

a. Song Without Words „ r j , , 

b. Valse Arabesque Olendelsshon 

H ' ' ' Lack 

Miss F. Bisei. 



Chopin 
Chaminade 

■ Chopin 
■ ■ . Raff 
MacDowell 
. . Verdi 



MAZURKA— Op. 33 Nr. 4 

Miss H. Carpenter 
PIANO-Duet Cachoucha op. 114 Nr. 3 . 

Misses B. Ludwig and L. Dickey 

VOCAL QUARTETTE-Little Primroses 

Bower, Lake, L. Bennet 



Misses Garrison, 
CONCERTO No. 2 . 

Miss C. Meue 
PAS DES AMPHORES 

Miss F. Pugh 



Chopin 

Schytte 
Pinsnli 
Beethoven 
Chaminade 



Miss M. Lake 
BUTTERFLY 

Miss K. Shaw 
VOCAL— May Night 

Miss F. Bower 
CONCERTSTUECK (Orchestra a. 



■ . Grieg 
Brahms 



rranged for second Piano) 
Miss F. Caveny 



Miss B. Ludwig 

: Two Deeps 
5 Sisters . . 
Misses E and T. Nachc 



Chaminade 
Moszkowski 



J Brahms 

■ l/oszhovs&i 



VALSE op. 34 

Miss m. Cdlley 

?0 QUARTETTE-Egmont Overture 

ses K Sm„- u ^ '■overture Beethoven 

S8S K. Shaw, H. Carpenter, e. Newcomet, j. Buck 



OVERTURE— The Merry Wives of Windsor Nicolai 

Pupils' Orchestra under the direction of ProE. Carl Samans 

PIANO SOLO— Variations Brillante op. 12 Chopin 

Miss Florence Doriss 

CONCERTO FOR PIANO AND ORCHESTRA . . . Schumann 

Miss Elizabeth R. Knight 

VIOLIN— Zigeunerweisen op. 20 Sarasate 

Miss Alice Greims 

PIANO— Fantasie op. 17 (two movements) Schumann 

Mr. Henry Hunter Welsh 

CAPRICCIO BRILLANTE op. 22 for Piano and Orchestra 

Mendelssohn 
Mrs. W. Lawrie Stevenson 

SONATE FOR PIANO Elsa Mohr 

(Composition class of Mr. Zeckwer.) 

Played by the Composer 

VOCAL — Aria from Tannhaeuser Wagner 

Miss Lottie Garrison 

PIANO SOLO— Fairy Dance op. 15 Jentsch 

Miss Jessie Fulweiler 
Distribution of Diplomas, Teachers' Certificates and Gold Medals 

ORCHESTRA— Coronation March from the Folkunger 

Kretschmer 



Pupils' Orchestra 



IT has been found in America, that but a few stud- 
ents of Music care to devote their time to the 
Wind and Brass Instruments of the Orchestra, 
therefore in order to establish at once a Pupils' Orches- 
tra and enable the pupils to become acquainted with the 
classical orchestra works, Mr. R. Zeckwer in 1888 
offered lessons on these instruments gratuitously, but 
even this inducement was not sufficient to attract our 
young people. Mr. Zeckwer then devised and had made 
seven organs of the exact compass of the wind instru- 
ments and in 1890 gave the first Concert with a full 
orchestra accompaniment. Since using these Organs, 
voiced to the different qualities of the orchestra instru- 
ments, it is possible to produce satisfactorily all the 
orchestra works of the great masters. The students 
gain much by this experience and also profit greatly by 
the necessary transposing which these different instru- 
ments require. Few schools in America can offer their 
pupils such advantages, and the enthusiasm with which 
the Orchestra is received in its many Concerts during 
the last ten years testifies to the great pleasure that these 
Concerts afford the general public. 



Chaminade 
Chopin 



CONCERT 

Given by Pupils of the 

IPMlafcelpWa musical Hca&ems 

at ther Hall, 1617 Spruce Street 
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° PROGRAAttE ° 

POLONAISE MILITAIRE 

Miss E. Newcomet C ''° pi " 

fiRAGONFLIES 

Miss J. Biack 
IMPROMPTU— a flat 

Miss L. Lake 
POLKA DE LA RBINE .... 

Miss B Funk ^ 

PIANO ?■ 'J a wil d Rose . 

o. At an Old Trysting Place .'.'..' ' } MacDowell 

Miss M. Caveny 
VOCAL-Duet from Aida 

Misses L Gakrxson and l. Lake' ' ""*" 
a. Song Without Words „ J 

h. Valse Arabesque .... Mendelsshon 

Miss F. Bisel ' LaCk 

UAZURKA-Op. i3 Nr. 4 

Miss H. Carpenter °' 0p '" 

PIANO-Duet Cachoucha op. „, Nr , 

Misses E. Lcdwig a™ l. Dickey ' *** 

VOCAL QUARTETTE-Little Primroses . w „ 

Misses Garrison, Bower, Lake, " L. Bennet ' ' 

CONCERTO No. 2 

Missc/meile* ' Beethoven 

PAS DES AMPHORES 

MissF. P UGH ' ' ' C/!a '""'^ 

VOCAL ?■ Jhy Beaming Eyes 

b- Come to Me McDowell 

Miss m'. Lake' ' ' *"**" 

BUTTERFLY 

Miss K. Shaw Grieg 

VOCAL-May Night . 

Miss F. bower ' ' ' ' *'' a/ '"" 

CONCERTSTUECK (Orchestra arranged for second Piano) 

Miss f. Caveny Chaminade 

SERENADE ... 



Miss B. Ludwig 



Moszkoivski 



VOCAL DUET i l be Two Deeps 

b. The Sisters . P . ' .' .' ; ; ; ; ■ } Brahms 



VALSE op. 34 



Misses e 



T. Nachod 



MissM-Cn^BY ' 



yO QUARTETTE-Egmont Overt,,-,, 

|SSESKS -- H -----N E wco.e T ,^^ 

T-, S,el„ M> P,a„„s are '"^et^.lTT^^s,,^ 






Fifteen 
Symphony 
Concerts 



THIRD SEASON 
J899-J900 



bunskr~~ 
...Orchestra 



HENRY GORDON THUNDER, Conductor. 



,„Witherspoon Hall.. 



FRIDAY AFTERNOONS AT 3.30 P. M. 

Dec. I Jan. 5 Feb. 2 March 2 March 30 
29 " 26 " 16 " 16 " 20 



Fifteenth Concert, Friday, April 20th 



[Maurits Leefson, Piano 
\ Nicholas Douty, Tenor 



Petschnikoff and Hambourg He has rare 
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fl/YTNU \ KaTZENSTEIN, MiSS Jessie Fur.WEll.ER, and assistants 

Virgil Practice Clavier Miss Seema Katzenstein 

Violin and Viola Gustav Hiele, Jueius Faek, Miss Gertrude Keppeeman 

Vocal Mrs. E. Aeine Osgood Dexter 

Theory, Composition and Orchestration Gustav HiEEE 

Violoncello W. WEEES (From the Royal Music School of Wuerzburg) 

Organ Henry Gordon Thunder 

Flute Martin Stobbe 

Sight Singing, Score-Reading and Symphony Classes .... Maurits LEEFSON 

Orchestra and Ensemble Classes Gustav HiEEE 

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Conservatory. Catalogues upon application to the Secretary. 



PROGRAMME— FRIDAY, APRIL 20 

Concerto No. 5, in F, Op. 103 Si. Saens 

(First performance in America.) 

a. Allegro animate b. Andante. c. Molto allegro. 

Mr. LEEFSON. 

" Faust'' Symphony Liszt 

(Repeated by request.) 
a. Allegro (Faust). b. Andante (Grelchen). c. Scherzo (Mephistopheles). 

The Apotheosis of Woman closing the last movement, will be given with the 
assistance of Mr. Douty, a male chorus from the Choral Society, and 
Mr. Win. S. Thunder, organist. 

The Estey Phonorium is 'rom the warerooms of the Estey Co., 1207 Chest- 
nut Street. 

The Kuabe Grand Piano is from Gimbel Bros., Ninth and Market Streets. 

An analysis of the Faust Symphony will be found on the next page. 

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The Faust Symphony of Liszt. 



The Faust Symphony is the great- 
est of Liszt's orchestral compositions. 
It is intended as a study of the three 
principal characters of Goethe's im- 
mortal work and not as might be 
imagined as an illustration of scenes 
from it. It is probably the first cycli- 
cal composition in which the same sub- 
jects are used in all the movements, 
varied rythmically and harmonically 
so as to express quite different emo- 
tions while not effacing the recollec- 
tion of their original significance. 
This treatment of a theme might 
almost justify calling it a Leitmotif. 
Sillding and other writers of to-day 
have carried out the same principle. 

The first movement begins without 
introduction on one of the most im- 
portant (hemes of the work. Played 
by the muted strings in unison and 
based on a succession of chromatic- 
ally descending augmented triads, it 
Skives a feeling of vague unrest and 
aimless endeavor intended no doubt 
to typify Faust's fruitless researches. 
This first theme leads at once into a 
second given out by the oboe accom- 
panied by the clarionets. Formed 
like the first on augumented triads, 
the piercing and sorrowful effect of 
the descending major seventh seems 
to voice the longing and unrealized 
ideals of life as Faust had found it. 
A little sighing figure of three notes 
in the violins brings in the repetition 
of this second subject in the hollow 
weird upper notes of bassoon (sound- 
ing an octave before the oboe). After 
a repetition of all this an important 
figure in the strings answered bv dis- 
sonant syncopations in the wind 
reintroduces the original first subject 
in the full orchestra in harsh and 
daring harmonization ending in a 
crashing fortissimo on a diminished 
seventh chord. The bassoon then 
echoes the second subject in morose 
color. A third subject, full of unrest, 
now enters, which developes into a 
form strongly suggestive of the 
motif of the love glance in "Tristan." 
As there is a chord progression in the 
last movement closely resembling the 
magic chords in the finale of the 
"Walkuere," it would be of great 
(Continued on nest page) 



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interest to learn which man unconsciously borrowed from the other. This 
third subject is developed at length and merges into a fourth of great sorrow 
and passionate despair, leading into a calmer repetition of the first in the 
clarionets under a " Waldweben "-like rustling of the violins. To this suc- 
ceeds a beautiful development of the little sighing figure of the strings. 
The poignant almost bitter second subject returns, metamorphosed into a 
beautiful love theme and developed at length. An awakening figure in the 
strings leads to a fifth subject of great breadth and simple nobility. On these 
five subjects the first whole of the first movement is worked out with won- 
derful skill and unflagging interest, though in freest form imaginable. The 
unsatisfied ideal of Faust is the main idea suggested, the movement ending 
with the second theme in the basses and celli alone. To express this restless 
idea Lizst has used in this one movement no less than 19 changes of tempo 
and 91 changes of time ! There are over 170 changes of time in the entire 
work. 

The second movement is in great contrast with the first, the two beauti- 
ful themes, typical of Gretchen and her love, breathing simplest purity and 
happiness. These are contrasted with some charming episodes, one of which 
is said to mean the scene of the petal-plucking test of love — " he loves me — 
he loves me not." The second theme from the " Faust " movement enters 
With great impressiveness and an impending sense of tragedy, followed by 
the passionate fourth subject, which gradually melts iuto the second again, 
(Continued on next page) 




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changed as in the first movement to a theme of love. The restless third sub- 
ject is also introduced, yielding at length to a repetition of the two Gretcheu 
themes and closing with a suggestion of the noble fifth theme. 

The final movement is a most successful attempt to express the sardonic 
and imp-like character of Mephistopheles. The wonderfully effective 
orchestration fits this evident conception to perfection. The second subject, 
so sad and yearning in the first movement, so dramatic in the second, here 
becomes a diabolical sneering joke. Even the vague first subject serves the 
purpose of bitter laughing, the restless third subject appears as an incessantly 
teasing theme, and another variant of the second appears like the distorted 
ridicule of cynicism. A fiendish fugue even is built on this mocked second 
theme. This torture of the Faust motives is suddenly arrested by a recollec- 
tion of the first Gretcheu motive soon forgotten however in renewed working 
of the third and fourth themes, until a mysterious chord on the stopped 
horns (already heard before) arrests the cruel sport for a moment while a sug- 
gestion of the first theme is traced in string pizzicatos. This sombre thought 
is flung aside for a frenzied return to the reckless play on the second subject 
to be shortly checked by the mysterious chord succession spoken of before, 
so suggestive of Wagner. Gradually decreasing and retarding as if at the 
command of a higher purpose and power, the Mephistophelan idea gives way 
to a second return of the Gretcheu theme, and while the trombones solemnly 
prophesy the theme of the mystic chorus the devilish scherzo sinks to an 
unresting close on the vague chord of the diminished third. The male voices, 
with a tenor solo touching the pure Gretchen motive while harp and organ 
lend majesty to the color proclaim the Apotheosis of Woman in the following 
quotation from Goethe's poem : 

"All earthly thiugs 

Are but as symbols. 

The indescribable 

Here is accomplished. 

Earth's insufficiency 

Here grows to event. 

The Woman Soul e're leads 

Upward and on." 

At the close, while the triumphant song swells out to a grand climax, 
deep underneath in the trombones and basses sounds out the theme of nobil- 
ity as proving that all the ideals we attain shall be through the pure and 
higher in our efforts. 

HENRY GORDON THUNDER. 



List of Works Performed this Season. 



Total number 60, by 33 composers. * American compositions, 5. fEirst 
performances in Philadelphia, 8. ttFirst performances, 3. **First perform- 
ance in United States, 1. 

Bach (J. S.). Chaconne in D minor, orchestrated by Raff. 

BEETHOVEN. Symphony No. 5. 



Berlioz. 

Borodin. 
Brahms. 
Cauffman. 
Dvorak. 

Eckert. 

GLINKA. 
GLUCK. 

Godard. 
goldmark. 



Gounod. 

Grieg. 

HAENDEL. 

Haydn, 

Hille. 

Joachim. 

Lang. (H. A.) 



Mendelssohn. 



monteverde. 
Mozart. 



Overture, "Lenore" No. 3. 

Serenade from the "Damnation of Faust" (Mr. 

Ringeisen). 

A Sketch of the Steppes of Central Asia. 

Symphony No. 2. 

*Death Carol (Mr. Cauffman). 

Overture " Husitska." 

Symphony No. 3, Op. 60 in D. 

"Love ceaseth nevermore " (Miss Foell). 

•(•Overture ' ' Life to the Czar. ' ' 

" Che Faro " (Miss McGuckin). 

Introduction and Allegro for piano, Op. 49 (Mr. C. 

Zeckwer). 

Overture " Prometheus Bound." 

Symphony " Country Wedding." 

Overture " Sapho." 

Funeral March of a Marionette. 

Two melodies for strings — Heartwounds, Spring. 

" Hear me ye winds and waves " (Mr. Ringeisen). 

Symphony in E flat. 

*Fifth violin concerto (Mr. Hille). 

tViolin concerto in D minor " Ungarische Weise " 

(Mr. Doell). 

*ttFantasic Dances. 

*ttSymphony No. 2. 

t Faust Symphony (given twice). 

tFantasie on a motif from Beethoven's " Ruins of 

Athens" (Miss Cady). 

Overture " Ruy Bias." 

" Midsummer Night's Dream." 

t" Ei Dorme," from " Orpheus" (Mr. Dalmas). 

Symphony in E flat. 

Piano concerto in D minor (Mr. R. Zeckwer). 



Powers. (Ada Weigel) 

Raff. 

scharwenka. 

Schubert. 

Schumann. 

St. Saens. 



Taylor (S. Coleridge). 
Tschaikowski. 



Wagner. 



Weber 



*ttlndian Love Song (Mis9 McGuckin). 
Symphony No. 5, " Lenore." 
First piano concerto (Mr. Kempton). 
Unfinished symphony. 
Piano concerto (Mr. Sternberg). 
Symphony No. 4. 

High Priest Aria, from "Sanson et Delila " (Mr. 
Dalmas). 

**Piano concerto No. 5 (Mr. Leefson). 
f" Onaway, Awake Beloved (Mr. Douty). 
Symphony No. 6 (Pathetique). 
*Suite " Mozartiana." 
Violin concerto (Mr. Brill). 
*Valse from " Eugene Oneguine." 
Overture " Tannhauser." 
Traume. 

" Dich Theure Halle " (" Tannhauser ") (Mis3 Foell) 
Kaisermarsch. 
Traume (Miss McGuckin). 

Procession of the Gods to Walhalla, " Rheingold." 
Wotan's Farewell and Magic Fire Scene. 
("Walkuere") (Mr. Ringeisen). 
Forging of the Sword (" Siegfried ") (Mr. Braun). 
Siegfried's Rhine Journey ("Gotterdammerung ") 
Prelude and Love Death (" Tristan and Isolde "). 
Klingsor's Magic Garden and the Flower Girls 
("Parsifal"). 

Quintette (" Meistersinger ") (Mrs. Zimmerman, 
Miss McGuckin, Mr. Braun, Mr. Clear, Mr. Rin- 
geisen). 

Overture to " Oberon." 
" Euryanthe," 



List of Soloists at the Concerts. 



Constantin von Sternberg, Piano. 
Maurits Leefson, Piano. 
George S. Kempton, Piano. 
Richard Zeckwer, Piano. 
Camille Zeckwer, Piano. 
Hariette Cady, Piano. 
Edwin A. Brill, Violin. 
Gustav Hille, Violin. 
Carl Doell, Violin. 



Marie K. Zimmerman, Soprano. 
Jennie E. Foell, Soprano. 
Kathryn C. McGuckin, Alto. 
John F. Braun, Tenor. 
Nicholas Douty, Tenor. 
William C. Clear, Tenor. 
Frank G. Cauffman, Baritone. 
Philip Dalmas, Baritone. 
W. J. Ringeisen, Bass. 



List of Guarantors. 



The Orchestra. 



First Violins. 
Edwin A. Brill, 
John K. Witzemann, Jr. 
John A. Meyer 
Ernest Kaehler 
Pasquale Bianculli 
Marcus Shrrbow 
Frrd. P. Ulrich 
David Dubinsky 

Second Violins. 

Alex, ritter 

Angelo GuiraTo 
Max Conrad 
Oscar Meyer 
Jos. A. Gasparro 
Edgar Gastel 
Jas. R. LEONE 
John Cianciarullo 
Violas. 
Emil Schmidt 
John Fruncillo 
Jas. Cianciarullo 
Milu Lemisch 

Violoncellos. 
Chas. G. Grebe 
Erwin Gastel 
Wm. Feustel 
Stanley Cauffman 

Contrabasses. 
Nat. Cohen 
F. H. Knorr 
George Mayer 
Stanley Mackaye 

Flutes. 
M. a. Rossi 
Wil. Baab 
Clem. Barone 

Piccolo. 
Clem. Barone 



Oboes. 
Adolph Sauder 
Max Lachmuth 
John Jessen 

English Horn. 
Max IvACHmuth 

Clarionets. 
Mat. Schlechtweg 
Sol. Eckstein 
J. E. Wagner 

Bass Clarionets. 
Sol. Eckstein 

Bassoons. 
Chr. HildebrandT 
Adam Flach 
F. Zimmerman 

Horns. 
Henry Koch 
Theo. Nigg 
Albert zellner 
Jos. Horner 

Trumpets. 
Jacob Beck 
Jacob Fuhs 
Fred Wiegandt 

Trombones. 
Paul P. Lotz 
F. Hartmann 
Ed. Gerhard 

Tuba. 

Stanley Mackaye 

Tympani. 
Wm. R. Stobbe 

Bass Drum, Cymbols, Triangle, Etc. 
Max Conrad 
Oscar Meyer 

Harp. 
F. CORTESE 



Mr. Daniel Baugh 
Miss Mary K. Gibson 
Mr. J. Geo. Klemm 
Mrs. Chas. B. Coxe 
Mrs. Florence Fox 
Mr. Richard Zeckwer 
Mrs. E. A. Lynch 
Mrs. A. M. Starr 
Mr. Ernest A. Congdon 
Mr. Theo. Presser 



Miss Jeanette E. Smith 
Mr. W. L> DuBois 
Mr. Selden Miller 
Miss Ethel Parrish 
Dr. E. I. Keffer 
Miss T. M. Forney 
Mr. Andrew Wheeler, Jr. 
Miss B. M. Hacker 
Miss K. W. Cheston 



The series of fifteen symphony concerts closing to-day is the third under 
my direction. Ten concerts were given during the season of 1897-98 and 
twenty in 1898-99. In these three years there have been given 165 different 
works by 71 composers, including almost every writer of importance from 
Bach to Wagner. Seven compositions were given for the first time, twenty- 
two for the first time in Philadelphia, and twenty-three were by American 
composers. As a number of the works were given two or three times during 
the three seasons there were 2o- ; numbers played in all at the 45 concerts. 

When the concerts were projected in November, 1897, it was claimed that 
there was plenty of good orchestral players in Philadelphia to form a sym- 
phony orchestra, though it was not expected with the limited resources at 
command that the concerts could be more than tentative at first. With public 
appreciation and support, however, it was hoped that it would be possible to 
hold frequent rehearsals, the greatest essential of all orchestral ensemble and 
finish. Tbe public, however, did not and has not responded, and the experi- 
ence of three years justifies little hope that it will do so to a continuance of 
the present effort. 

The concerts have been given on the most economical basis possible ; 
the members of the orchestra have played far more to aid me in my attempt, 
and for their own improvement and pleasure than for the small pecuniary 
return assured them, and each year a number of disinterested music lovers 
have subscribed to a guarantee fund. Nevertheless each of the forty-five 
concerts has been a personal financial loss to me. 

It is felt however that the original claim made has been proven, viz : that 
from the more than 900 resident orchestral players of Philadelphia a sym- 
phony orchestra of 80 or even 100 players could be chosen that with sufficient 
rehearsal would need no apology. 

HENRY GORDON THUNDER, 

313 South Tenth Street. 



jprogramme 

Camille W. Zeckwer 

Quartette for Piano, Violin, Viola and Violoncello 
First Movement, Allegro Energico 

MR. CARL DOELL, Violin 
MR. HOWARD RATTAY, Viola 
MR. RUDOLF HENNIG, Violoncello 
MR. CAMILLE W. ZECKWER, Piano 



William R. Stobbe 

Aria for Tenor, " Retrospection " 

MR. JOHN F. BRAUN 

MR. DAVID EDGAR CROZIER, Piano 



Gustav Hille 

Two Pieces for Violin and Piano 



a. Cradle Song 

b. Bolero 



MR. JAN KOERT 



Frank G, Cauffman 

Song, "Introspection" 



MR. FRANK G. CAUFFMAN, Baritone 
MR. CARL DOELL, Violin 
MR. STANLEY H. CAUFFMAN, Violoncello 
MR. RUSSELL KING MILLER, Piano 



programme 

William W. Gilchrist 



Piano Solos 

a. Berceuse 

b. Romanza 



MR. DAVID EDGAR CROZIER 



Three Songs 



a. The Guardian Angel . Celeste D. Heckscher 

b. "Love Comes Back to his Vacant Dwelling" 

David Edgar Crozier 

c. Song from "The Brushwood Boy" (Kipling) 

A. Mailert Zellner 
MRS. RUSSELL KING MILLER 
MR. RUSSELL KING MILLER. Piano 



Henry Albert Lang 

Quintette for Piano, Flute, Clarinet, Horn and Bassoon 

l Allegro, Moderato assai 
4 Allegro vivace, giocoso 

MR. M. A. ROSSI, Flute 
MR. H. J. WEISENBORN, Clarinet 
MR. RICHARD BUCHHOLZ, Horn 
MR. CHR. HILDEBRANDT, Bassoon 
MR. HENRY A. LANG, Piano 



fflt ct'V 




Philadelphia Musical academy 

1617 Spruce Street 



Wednesday Evening, May J 6th 
Friday Evening:, May 18th 



W1 



geuei)tl? (Ooijeert 

Oiven by the PupiJs of the 

irarjGl? 

Philadelphia /T\u8Kal /taademy 



Given by the Pupili 

Ciern\aQtou/Q BrapGl? 



Friday, fl\ay 25, 1900 
8 o'eloelf 



ASSOCIATION HALL 

(MAIN and RITTENHOUSE STREETS) 

Germantown 



PROGRAMME ON MAY 16th 



i. Credo from "Othello" . . • • " • Verdi 

MR. CARL SCHACHNER 

2. Bridal Duet from " Lohengrin " . . . Wagner 

MISS VIRGINIA PAYNTER and MR. RYLAND PHILLIPS 



Weber 



3. Scenes from "Freischuetz" 

a. Duet of Agnes and Annie 

MISSES MAE LYND and MABEL ROCKEFELLER 

b. Aria of Annie 

MISS ROCKEFELLER 

c. Aria of Agnes 

MISS LYND 

d. Aria of Rodolph 

MR. JAMES MacGEHEAN 

4. Fidelity, Duet Schumann 

MISS ISABELLA REILLEY and MR. GEO. MORRIS 



5. The Jewel Song from "Faust" . 

MISS SADIE HARLAN 

6. Recitativ and Aria from " Creation " 

MR. ALLEN HINCKLEY 



7. Aria from "Traviata" . •',-•• 

MRS. MAX ROSENTHAL 

8. Duet from " Creation " . 

MISS HARLAN and MR. HINCKLEY 



. Gounod 

Haydn 

Verdi 

Haydn 

Verdi 



9. Duet from * * Rigoletto " . 

MRS. ROSENTHAL and MR. SCHACHNER 

10. Sextet from •« Lucia " .... Donizetti 

MRS. ROSENTHAL, MISS CULLEY 
And MESSRS. MacGEHEAN, LOOS, HINCKLEY and SCHACHNER 



PROGRAMME ON MAY J8th 

* 

1 . Prologue from ' ' Pagliacci " . . . Leoncavallo 

MR. CARL SCHACHNER 

2. The Spinning Wheel Song from ' * Faust * ' . . Gounod 

MISS SADIE HARLAN 

3. Speech and Evening Star from " Tannhaeuser " Wagner 

MR. EDWIN LUCKENBACH 

4. a. Ich kann's nicht fassen, nicht glauben "l 
b. Er, der Herrlichste von Allen / 

MISS LOUISE KUMME 

5. Duet from " Stradella " Flotow 

MESSRS. EDWARD LOOS and GEO. MORRIS 

6. Elsa's Dream from "Lohengrin" . . . Wagner 

MISS VIRGINIA PAYNTER 

7. Terzet from * ' Creation ' ' . . . . . Haydn 

MISS HARLAN and 
MESSRS. RYLAND PHILLIPS and ALLEN HINCKLEY 

8. Aria from "Figaro" Mozart 

MISS MABEL ROCKEFELLER 

9. Quintet from " Lohengrin " j Wagner 

MISSES PAYNTER and TRACY and 
MESSRS. PHILLIPS, HINCKLEY and SCHACHNER 

10. a. Spring Song Mendelssohn 

b. Song of May .... Max Joseph Beer 

Two Chorusses sung by 

MDMS. DOUGHERTY, ROGERS, ROSENTHAL, MISSES CULLEY, 
HARLAN. McHUGH, JOHNSTON, KUMME, LYND, PAYNTER, 
REILLEY, ROBERTSON, ROCKEFELLER, SHILL, TRACY, WEIL, 
WILSON, WOLF and MESSRS. DESSALET, DOUGHERTY, 
FRITSCH, MacGEHEAN, GRUGAN, HEUISLER, HINCKLEY, 
HOWELL, LINEHAN, LOOS, LUCKENBACH, MORRIS, PHILLIPS, 
SETTLE and WILSON 



Accompanists, MISSES MAZIE CULLEY and NANCY SHILL 



program-.- 



Symphony Class. 

IMisses F. 


March from Tannhauser, ' 
and E. Caveny, F. Doriss, M, 


Wagner 
BUEEUS 


Piano. 






Album Leaf, 
Miss W. Jacobs 




Grutzmacher 


Piano. 






Mountain Stream, 
Miss M. PIomileER 




Smith 


Vocal. 




Aria from Sampson and Delilah, 
Miss M. BuLEUS 




St. Saens 


Piano. 






Chromatic Valse, 
Mr. F. Stoer 




Godard 


Duo for two pianos 


Sonatine, 
Messrs. W. Brown and P. Freeman 




dementi 


Vocal. 




Duo from Aida, 
Misses L. Garrison and L. Lake 




Verdi 


Violin. 






Concerto, 
Master B. D'AmEEIO 




Rode 


Symphony Class. 
Misses F. 


Overture from Tannhauser, 
Doriss, M. Bueeus, F. Caveny, Mr. 


Wagner 
P. Stoer 


Vocal. 






May Morning, 
Mrs. Chas. F. Bochman 




Denza 


Piano. 




a. 
b. 


To a Wild Rose, 
At an Old Trysting Place 
Miss Martha Caveny 


} 


McDowell 


Piano. 




a. 
b. 
c. 


Valse, 

Song Without Words, 
Valse Arabesque, 
Miss Florence Bisee 




Durand 

Mendelssohn 
Lack 


Vocal. 
Piano. 




a. 
b. 


Thy Beaming Eyes, 
Come to me, Sweetheart, 
Miss L. Lake 

Concert Stuck, 
Miss Florence Caveny 




McDowell 
Bartlctt 

Chaminade 


Violin. 

Piano. 




b. 


Cavatine, 
Bolero, 
Mr. I-I. BOEHRINGER 
Concerto, 
Miss Florence Doriss 




Raff 
Hille 

Schuman 


Vocal. Quartette. Pretty Primrose, 

Misses L. Garrison, E. Upjohn, L. Lake, L. 
Symphony Class. Tarantelle, 

Miss F. DoRiSS, Mr. F. Stoer, Misses F. Caveny 


Pinsuti 

Bennett 

Doehler 

, M. Bueeus 



STEINWAY PIANOS USED 



THE Germantown Branch of the well-known Philadelphia 
Musical Academy was opened thirteen years ago by Mr. 
^ Richard Zeckwer. The curriculum includes all branches of 
music, and the teachers are all well-known artists in their pro- 
fession. 

Being the only Conservatory in Germantown, it offers advan- 
tages to its students that they could not possibly obtain by private 
teaching-. 



The class system taught in this Academy is adopted, not be- 
cause it is the cheapest., but because it is the best manner of en- 
couraging interest and ambition in the students. Many other 
advantages are also offered through the many lessons given them 
gratuitously, such as Theory, Symphony and Ensemble Classes, etc. 

The school is now under the direction of Mr. Camille W. 
Zeckwer, who is desirous to sustain and increase its reputation. 

There are accommodations for 500 pupils. The classes re- 
open September the third, 1900. 



For circulars apply to 



CAMILLE W. ZECKWER, 

Proprietor and Director. 



Vocal and Instrumental Concert 

UNDER THE DIRECTION OF 
PROF. RICHARD ZECKWER 

Given for the benefit of 

ST. THOMAS AQUINAS CHURCH 

AT THE ENGLESIDE HOTEL 
Friday Evening, Aug. 17th, at 8 o'clock 

PROGRAMME 

Son-ata for Piano and Violin, C minor Grieg 

Messrs. R. Zeckwer and Carl Doell 

Vocal A May Morning Denza 

Miss Nellie E. Reger 

Piano Solo— (a) . . . Romanza Rubinstein 

(b) . . . Les Sylvains Chaminade 

Mr. Camille W. Zeckwer 

Vocal— Air from " Samson and Delila" St. Saens 

Mrs. William Mears 

Violin SOLI— (a) . . Adagio from 7th Concerto Sphor 

(b) . . All 'Ungherese Wilhelmj 

Mr. Carl Doell 

Piano Duet— (a) . . Brautreigen Ph. Scharwenka 

(b) . . Prologue to Pagliaroi Leoncavallo 

Mrs. W. Mears and Mr. S. Herrmann 

Vocal— (a) Thy Beaming Eyes MacDowell 

(b) . . . . A Fair Good Morn Nevin 

Miss Marie Zeckwer 

Piano Solo .... Soiree de Vienne Liszt 

Mr. Rich. Zeckwer 

Violin Soli ... Two Hungarian Dances . . Brahms-Joachim 

Mr. Carl Doell 

Vocal Ritournell Chaminade 

Mrs. W. Mears 

Piano Duet . . Hungarian Rhapsodie, No. 2 Liszt 

Messrs. R. and C. Zeckwer 
Admission, 50 cts. Reserved Seats, $1.00 




ry lAd (r^\ 



-i 



crD-S" 



Jfa. 3 



m 



11 



So/ 



507£ CONCERT 



Saturday Evening:, Nov. 24th, at 8 o'clock 
Musical Fund Hall, (8th and Locus! Sts.) 

PROGRAMME 

TRIO for Piano, Violin and Violoncello. Smetana 
a Moderate assai b Allegro, ma non troppo 

c Finale 
Messrs. Rich. Zeckwer, Carl Doell, Rud. Hennig 



PIANO SOLO 



a Ballade, a flat 
b Scherzo, b flat minor 
Mr. Aime Lachaume 



Chopin 



VIOLIN SOLO— Italian Suite Paganini -Wilhclmj 

a Air b March c Barcarole d Romauze 

e Moto perpetuo 

Mr. Carl Doell 

VIOLONCELLO SOLO— 

Adagio from Concerto Molique 
Mr. R. Hennig 

VOCAL— La Ballade du Desespere (new) Bemberg 

with accompaniment for Piano, Violin and Velio 

Miss Marie Biidinger 

CONCERT PATHETIQUE for two Pianos Liszt 

Messrs. Wassili Leps and Leland Howe 



Tickets, $1.00 



Students.' Ticket, 50 cts. 

i N. Stetson, 1111 Chestnut Street. 



Qj^V^\A 



oi the 

Philadelphia Musical Academy <£ Q (f J ^ 

Saturday Evening, Nov. 24th, at 8 o'clock lj\^ ff ' 



Music Teacners' Concert. 

th?", Saturday "enlng last, in spite of 
th™ C and thre atening weathe 

there was scarcely a vacant seat in the 
Musical Fund Hall, where the teachers 
^,«. the .v^ hiladelphla Musical Academy 
gave their 607th concert. The 
Won of the programme was as much 
masterpiece of common sense as „ is the 
rendering an evidence of consumnia i u 
sicianly skill and understanding. -Instead 
of a collection of classical mons 
famous simply because of the names o 
the composers, there were given somi 
such 6 m ° St de " ghtfu1 ' haunting melodies 
with a music-loving soul. It is* to "be de 
voutly hoped that the example set will b, 
widely followed. The programme con 
sisted of six numbers. She tjrst was 
trio for piano, violin, anff violoncello b 
Smetana, rendered by BI«jsrs. R 
wer, Carl Doell nnri ».Vh xj„„„._. ._ 



ind Rlfd. Hennig in 
>«■ worthy of their reputation. Cho- 
Ballade, A flat, and Scherzo, B flat 
r '^T' aS Mr- AIme La -ehaume's piano 
.... The exquisite singing tone, the mas- 
terly execution, and the soulful phrasing 
brought forth a storm of applause, which 
was as complimentary to the appreciation 
of the, audience as to the skill of the 
musician. That the Italian Suite of 
Paganini- Wilhelmj, Mr. Carl Doell's violin 

evening is vouched for by the fact that it 
was played by Mr. Doell, while that Mr. 
R. Hennig rendered Molique's Adagio 
from Concerto is the same as saying that 
no "cellist on this continent couid have 
surpassed, even if equalled, the masterly 
skill with which the full, deep meaning 
was expressed. Miss Marie Budinger's 
song, "La Ballade du Desespere," a new 
composition by Bemberg, was very heart- 
ily received. Liszt's Concert Pathetique 
for two pianos— Messrs Wassili Leps and 
Leland Howe— was a soulful ending to an 
evening the recollection of which, in many 
memories, will long linger and echo. 







flftanuscrtpt flftusic Society 

of lPbtla&elpbia 



ttentb Season 
first Private flbeeting 

WHetmesoaB Everting, IRovembec 21, 1900 

3be ©rpbeua Club 1100018, ffiaher JBullbmg 
1520 Cbeetnut street 

at cigbt fifteen 






J 



Of 



507i CONCERT 

Given by the Teachers 
of the 

Philadelphia Musical Academy *£ 

Saturday Evening, Nov. 24th, at 8 o'clock 
Musical Fund Hall, (8th and Locust Sts.) 

PROGRAMME 

TRIO for Piano, Violin and Violoncello, Sun-tana 
a Moderate assai * Allegro, ma non troppo 

c Finale 
Messrs. Rich. Zeckwer, Carl Doell, Rud. Hennig 

PIANO SOLO a Ballade, a flat I rfiobin 

b Scherzo, b flat minor | ' 

Mr. Aime Lachaume 

VIOLIN SOLO- Italian Suite Paganini-Wilhelmj 

a Air b March c Barcarole d Romanze 

e Moto perpetuo 

Mr. Carl Doell 

VIOLONCELLO SOLO— 

Adagio from Concerto Moliquc 
Mr. R. Hennig 

VOCAL— La Ballade du Desespere (new) Ban box 

with accompaniment for Piano, Violin and Velio 

Miss Marie Biidinger 

CONCERT PATHETIQUE for two Pianos Liszt 

Messrs. Wassili Leps and Leland Howe 



Tickets, $1.00 



Students' Ticket, 50 cts. 



Qj^(l^^ 



Ut ^V 



r 



The Steinway Pianos are from N. Stetson, till Chestnut Street. 



Music Teacher,' Concert. 
On Saturday evening last. In spite of 
tL% n U ™ 6aSant and thre atenin g weather, 
there was scarcely a vacant seat in the 
""•J" 1 £»»« Hail, where the teachers 
of the Philadelphia Musical Academv 
gave their 607th concert TheseS 

m^te°rpiece oTccunrTn sin" at waVV 
rendering an evidence of consummaT/mu 6 
slcianly skill and understanding. -Instead 
of a collection of classical monstrosities, 
famous simply because of the names of 
the composers, there were given soma 
of the most delightful, haunting melodies, 
such as could be appreciated by any one 
with a music-loving soul. It is to be de- 
voutly hoped that the example set will be 
widely followed. The programme con- 
sist, d of six numbers, ^he first was a 
trio for piano, violin, antf -violoncello, by 
Smetana, rendered by Messrs. Rich, Zeck- 
— Carl Doell, and Ru'd. Hennig in a 
ler worthy of their reputation. Cho- 
Ballade, A flat, and Scherzo, B flat 
minor, was Mr. Aime Lachaume 1 s piano 
solo. The exquisite singing tone, the mas- 
terly execution, and the soulful phrasing 
brought forth a storm of applause, which 
was as complimentary to the appreciation 
of the, audience as to the skill of the 
musician. That the Italian Suite of 
Paganini-Wilhelmj, Mr. Carl Doell's violin 
solo, was one of the main features of the 
evening Is vouched for by the fact that it 
was played by Mr. Doell, while that Mr, 
R. Hennig rendered Molique's Adagio 
from Concerto is the same as saying that ' 
no 'cellist on this continent could have 
surpassed, even if equalled, the masterly 
skill with which the full, deep meaning 
was expressed. Miss Marie Budingers 
song, "La Ballade du Desespere," a new 
composition by Bemberg, was very heart- 
i- — ceived. Liszt's Concert Pa'thetique 
-— ~.vo pianos— Messrs "Wassili Leps and 
Leland Howe— was a soulful ending to an 
lg the recollection of which, in many 
ries, will long linger and echo. 



program 

IRequfem tot ffour IDoices, Uiolfn, piano ano 

©rgan 

jfranft <3. Gauffman 

MRS. E.M. ZIMMERMAN, MRS. C. K. ZIMMERMAN 
MESSRS. DOUTY, ZIMMERMAN, STOLL, GOEPP, CROZIER 



Uwo pieces for piano 



2>avi0 jEOgar Greater 



Valse — Caprice 
Minuet 



MR. CROZIER 



TCbree Songs 



Stanleg BOOichs 



Margreta 

A Riddle 

O Moonlight Deep and Tender 



MRS. ADDICKS 



String Quartette camtiie m. JZecftwer 

THE BEETHOVEN QUARTETTE 
MESSRS. STOLL, BRILL, SCHMIDT, HENNIG 



Uwo Sbafeesperian part Songs 



IRfcbolas 2>outg 



Winter — Love's Labor Lost 
Come Away Death — Twelfth Night 



MRS. E. M. ZIMMERMAN 
MRS. W1GHTMAN 
MISS RILEY 
MR. GURNEY 
MR. CAUFFMAN 



MRS.C. K. ZIMMERMAN 
MRS. ADDICKS 
MR. SCHURIG 
MR. GILCHRIST 
MR. ZIMMERMAN 



Sttf 



/T oncert . . . 
Hlumni Hssociation 

Ipbila&clpbta flHusical Hca&cm? 

SaturOas Evening, Sec. S, 1900 
1617 Spruce Street 



• -Program. . 

PIANO QUARTET, TARANTELLE, ■ Reinberger. 

Misses Davis, Sutor, Gessner and Pattee. 

VOCAL SOLO, " ELSA'S DREAM," LOHENGRIN, Wagner. 

Miss Lily F. Jones. 

PIANO SOLO, SONATA, Op 31, No. 3, - Beethoven. 

ALLEGRO. 

ALLEGRETTO VIVACE. 
MENUETTO. 
PRESTO CON FUOCO. 
Mr. Leland Howe. 



4. VIOLIN SOLO, ROMANZE, Bruch. 

Miss Alice Baker. 

5. VOCAL SOLO. "JERUSALEM, THOU THAT KlLLEST THE 

PROPHETS," from "ST. PALL." 
Miss Lily F. Jones. 

6. PIANO SOLO, ETUDES, Op 10, No. 4, - - • Chopin. 

Op 10, No. 3, - - - 
RHAPSODIE, No. 2, - - - Liszt. 

Mr. Leland Howe. 

7. DUO FOR TWO PIANOS, DANCE MACABRE. - SI. Sains. 

Misses Els.i Mohr and Anna Shill. 



5lO tb (Joncert 






Given bfi tpupils of tbc 






fl>btla&elpbia flDustcal Hca&emp 




llbursDas Evening, Sec. I3tb 


Kt tbc Hall 




at sigbt wclocft tew Spruce Street 




programme 






PIANO— i a) Berceuse j 
(b) Polonaise J 

Mr. C. Bawden 


Chopin 




VOCAL-Tell Me Why 

Miss F. Bower 


Tschaikovvski 




PIANO— (a I Etude op. io Nr. 3 . 

(b) Sonate C major op. 2 Nr. j 
Miss A. Cause 


Chopin 
Beethoven 




VOCAL— (a) Where Ere You Walk 

(b) May Dew- 
Miss G. Watson 


Handel 
. Bennett 




VIOLIN— Air— On the G string . 

Miss C. Heck 


Bach 




VOCAL — Duet— Calm as the Night 

Misses E. Upjohn. M. Bulles 


Goetze 




PIANO— Polonaise 

Mr. W. Golze 


Weber 




VIOLIN— Intermezzo .... 
Miss M. Zeckwer 


Godard 




VOCAL— The Wanderer . 

Miss M. Bulles 


Schubert 




PIANO— Impromptu C sharp minor 

Miss B. Oestheimer 


Reinhold 




VOCAL— Berceuse 

Miss E. Upjohn 


Godard 




PIANO— Valse—C sharp minor 

Miss F. Urban 


Chopin 




VOCAL— (a) Heimweh 

(b) My Abode' 

Miss L. Lake 


Brahms 
Schubert 




Violin— Nocturno . ... 

Mr. N. Fry 


Chopin 




PIANO— la- Prelude 

(b) Fruehlingsrauschen 
id Etincelles. 

Miss F. Caveny 


Rachmaninoff 

Sinding 

Moszkowski 




VOCAL— Quirttett— Serenade 

Misses Garrison, Bulles. Lake. Rennet 


Schubert 
Bower 




The Stelnwn> GranJ is from N. St. Is 


:hestnul Slree! 





512™ CONCEPT 

GIVEN BY 

PUPILS 

OF THE 

Philadelphia Musical 
Academy 

Tuesday Evening, Januarg 15th 
at 5 o'clock 

AT 

MUSICSL PUND HALL 
Eighth and Locust Streets 



I 



r// 



P 



Programme 



OVERTURE " Heimkehr aus der Fremde " Mendelssohn 

Pupils Orchestra, under the direction of Prof. Carl Samans 

VOCAL "In Autumn" Franz 

Miss F. Bower 

PIANO " Sonate appassionata " (ist movement) Beethoven 

Mr. W. Heider 

STRING Quartette Ditters dorf 

Misses A. Baker, R. Jackson, J. De Long, M. Brehm 



CONCERTO for Violin N 12 

Miss R. Jackson 



Spohr 



VOCAL " My Heart is Weary," from Opera, Nadeshda Gordon Thomas 

Miss M. Shaub 



VIOLONCELLO Solo a "Romance" 

b " Serenade Badine" 
Marie Brehm 

Romance for Violin and String Orchestra 

Miss A. Baker 

PIANO Nocturno op. 15 Nr. 1 F sharp major 

Miss M. C. Parker 



Franchomme 
Gabriel Marie 



Svendsen 
Chopin 



Sonate for Piano and Violine a Andante b Scherzo Elsa Mohr 

The composer and MR. R. YOUNG 



a " My Love " 

b " Florian's Song " 

Miss M. Zeckwer 



Camille W. Zeckwer 
Godard 



Andante for four Violoncelli Schaeffer 

Misses A. Bundy, H. Boerecke, E. Mayer, M. Brehm 



VOCAL 

VIOLIN Solo 
PIANO Solo 

ORCHESTRA 



a ," Far from Home" 
b " Thy Beaming Eyes " 
Miss L. Lane 

Concerto (2 movements) 
Mr. o. wittich 

a "Prelude" 
b " Toccata" 

Miss F. caveny 



Turkish March " 



Brahms 
McDowell 



Bruch 



Rachmaninoff 
Paradisi 



Beethoven 



The Steinway Grand is from N. Stetson & Co., 111! Chestnut St. 



PUPILS ORCHESTRA 



FLUTE 



Miss A. Baker 
Miss R. Jackson 
Miss J. DeLong 


Miss A. 
OBOE 


Beekman 


Mr. W. Abendroth 


Miss S. 


Gilbert 


Mr. R. Young 
Mr. O. Wittich 
Miss M. Obdyke 


CLARINETTE 

Miss E. 


Mohr 


Miss F. Sivel 
Miss C. Heck 
Miss F. Warren 


BASSON 

Miss B. 


McNab 


Miss M. Pennypacker 


Horn 




Miss T. Osterhelt 
Miss M. Zeckwer 


Miss E. 
TRUMPET 


Funk 


VIOLAS 


Miss L. 


Berry 


Mr. L. Freeman 

Mr. E. Schmidt (Teacher) 


TROMBONE 

Miss J. 


Catanach 


VIOLONCELLI 

Marie Brehm 
Mr. S. Cauffman 


TIMPANI 

Mr. C. 


Bawden 


Mr. W- Schmidt 


Great Drum 




Mr. A. Hassler 


Mr. E. 


Crouthers 


DOUBLE BASSES 

Mr. J. Fasshauer (Teacher) 


TRIANGLE 

Miss H. 


Carpenter 


Mr. G. Merril 







51) 



Slf 



&' i 






Qoncert... 




Hlumni H^sociation 




of tbe 




|Pbilat>clpbta fl|>usical Hca5cm^ 


at tbc THall, 1617 Spruce Street Satm^av, ^February; i»tb, at 8 p. m. 


Programme 




i DUO for two Pianos a Serenade 

b Valse Carnevalesque 


Goldmark 
. Chaminade 


Mrs. L. Fjtz-Maurice and Mrs. Ckas. T 


AY LOR 


2 VOCAL Aria from Maria da Rohan 


Donizetti 


Mrs. George Gf.bbie 




3 PIANO SOLO a Pastorale 
* Gavotte 


Scarlatti 
Gluck-Brahms 
Gounod-Raff 


Mrs. Fitz-Matjrice 




4 VOCAL a Violets 

h Ritournelle 


Ellen Wright 


Mary STEWART Davis 




5 'CELLO SOLO a Romance 

b Serenade Badine 


Franchonnne 
Gabriel Marie 


Marie Brehm 




6 PIANO SOLO a Romanze 

b Moment Musical 
c Les Sylvains 


. Rubinstein 
C. W. Zeckwer 
. Chaminade 


Mr. Camii.i.e Zeckwer 




7 VOCAL Come to Me 


Bemberg 


Mrs. Gebbie 




S PIANO DUO " Sachsen's Sclilusslied." From Die 
Mrs. Taylor and Mrs. Fiiv.-Mauri 


Meistersinger 
Wagner-Wallace 



5lG tb (£oncert-> 

divcn bB IPliptlS 

fl>bila&clpbta flftusical Hcat>cm\> 



CuesCav. Evening, ffebruare I9tb, at 


Eiilbt O'ClOCR 


Programme 




ORGAN— Air du Dauphin . 


Best 


.Miss M. Marshall 




PIANO— Sonate Pathetique (ist movement) 


Beethoven 


Miss B. McNab 




PIANO— Hunting Song 


Mendelssohn 


Spinning Song 




Mr. W. Golz 




VIOLIN -Legende 


Wieniawski 


M». I. ROSENFELD 




PIANO— Capriecio, a minor 


Mendelssohn 


Miss B. Koerper 




PIANO— a To the Spring . 


Grieg 
Rheinberger 


b La Chasse 


Miss H. Carpenter 




VOCAL— Hindoo Song 


Bemberg 


Miss M. E. Williams 




PIANO-Soiree de Vienne, Nr. 6 . 


Liszt 


Miss R. Thomas 




PIANO— Sonate, op. 26 . 


. Beethoven 


Miss A. Weir 




VIOLIN-Cavatine 


Raff 


Miss D. Simons 




PIANO DUO— Impromptu Manfred 


Reinecke 


Misses M. Culley and E. Fu 


<K 


VOCAL— a Night Sinks on the Wave 


Smart 


b Come Away 


Perkins 


c Water Nymphs 


Smart 


Sight Singing Class 




PIANO— Impromptu Valse 


Liszt 


Miss A. Beekman 




PIANO— Spinning Song 


Wollenhaupt 


Miss R. Futhby 




VOCAL— a Faith in Spring 1 
b Who is Sylvia / 




Schubert 


Miss G. Watson 




PIANO— Gavotte 


Bach-St. Saens 


Miss F. Lew 




PIANO— Evening Star 


Liszt 


Miss E. Husted 




VIOLIN— Symphony Espagnole 


Lalo 


Mr. R. Vounc 




PIANO— Concerto, d minor 


Mozart 


Miss F. Urban 





517$ (JJojicert-^ 

of tbc 

([>bilat>elpbia flftusical BcaJ>emp 
oiven big tbe Geacbere 



tbcir Mall, 1617 Spruce Street 



programme 

Piano Duo . Isolde's Love Death . Wagner 

Messrs. Rich. Zeckwer and .Carl Samans 

Violoncello Soli a Serenade 

b Tarantelle . . . Lindner 

Mr. Rudolph Hennig 

Violin Soi.o . Hungarian Concerto . . Joachim 

Mr. Carl Doell 

Piano Soli a Improvisation) . . _ 

I . MacDowell 

b Valse triste j 

c Ballade, G minor . . Chopin 

Mb. Leland Howe 

Sonatk kor Piano and Violin, op. 45, C minor Grieg 

a Allegro 
b Romance 
c Finale 
Messrs. Wassili Leps and Carl Doell 






n 8 



f :. 






jfcy Jtort ^0 



52i« Concert 

pupils 
H>bilaodpbia flftusical Hca&em? 

SaturOav Evening, /Ibarcb I6tb 

programme 



VOCAL— With Verdure Clad 

Miss E. Upjohn 

riANO— In the lovely month of Max- 
Miss N. Lackky 


Haydn 
Merckel 


PIANO— Stiniinuiigsbilder . 

,i Tanzlied. o Am Abend, c Ungarisch 
Miss L. Stewart 


. Hoffmann 


VOCAL— a The Bondmaid 
b Lullaby 


Lalo 

Vannah 



Miss L. Bennett 

PIANO— a Nocturno op. 15, No. 2) 

b \'alse op. iS ) 

Mr. C. Bawdkn 
VOCAL— a The Herb Forgetfulness 
b Shepherd's Song 

Miss M. Zkckwek 



'1ANO — a S'rcii.i'U- 



Miss M. Hanc 






PIANO— Sonate Palhetique (1st movement) 
Miss L. Smith 


. Beethoven 


VOCAL— a Icli Hoer Ein Lied 
b Lament 

Miss M. Bn.i.i-s 


Mendelssohn 
. Chadwick 


PIANO— a Si j 'etaisoiseaux 

Miss M. Mills 


Henselt 
Moszkowski 


PIANO— Invitation to the Dance 

Miss H. Young 


Weber 


VOCAL— a Cradle Song . 
b I Love Thee . 

Miss L. Lake 


Moszkoswski 
Grieg 


PIANO— a Prelude and Fugue, C sharp major 
b Rigoletto Paraphrase 

Miss 0. Pahi. 


Bach 
Liszt 



Manuscript Music Society 






Of Philadelphia 



TENTH SEASON 



nrm private meeting 



Wednesday Evening, March 27th. 1901 



The Orpheus Club Rooms, 1 520 Chestnut Str. 



52i?t Concert 

pupils 
Ipbilabelpbia Musical Hca&cmv> 

at Ibcir Wall, li?17 Spruce Street 

Saturday; Evcntng, /lfcarcb I6tb 
IPvoGramme ' 



YOCAL- 


-With Verdure Clad 

.Miss E. Upjohn 


Haydn 


PIANO- 


In the lovely month of May 

Miss N. Lackey 


Merckel 


PIANO- 


Stimmungsbilder . 

a Tanzlied. b Am Abend, c Ungarisch 
Miss I.. Stewart 


. Hoffmann 


YUCAL- 


-a The Bondmaid 
b Lullaby 

.Miss L. Bennett 


Lalo 
Vannah 


PIANO- 


,7 Nocturnoop. 15. No. 2 1 


Chopin 


VOCAL- 


-a The Herb Forgetfnlntss 
b Shepherd's Song 

Miss M. Zkckwek 


FieliU 
Delibes 


PIANO- 


-a Serenade 
b Spring Song 

".Miss M. Hancock 


Pierne 
Liebling 


PIANO- 


Miss L. Smith 


. Beethoven 


VDCAI. 


-a Ich Hoer Ein Lied 
b Lament 

Miss M. Bn.i.is 


Mendelssohn 
. Chadwick 


PIANO- 


b Sparks 

Miss M. Mii.i.s 


Henselt 
Mos/kowski 


PI ANO- 


-Invitation to the Dance 


Weber 


VOCAL 


— a Cradle Song 
* I Love Thee 


Moszkoswski 
Grieg 



Miss L. Lake 
IANO — a Prelude and Fugue, C sharp majo 
b Rigoletto Paraphrase 

Miss 11. Pahi. 



The Stkixway g« 



& Co., ...1 Che 



Programme 



1, Piano Duets 

a. March of the Giants 

b. Rural Festival 

(from the Fantastic Dances) 
Mr. Lano 

Miss Eugenie Lang 



Henry A. Lang 



2. Sacred Song, "Prayer" 



Frank G. Cauffman 



Mrs. Adele Steinbre 
Mr. Stanley Cauffm 



'Ein Sonatensatz" for Violin and Piano, 

Richard Zeckwer 

Mr. Carl Doell and Mr. Zeckwer 



Programme 



Songs 

a. The Snowflake 

b. Die alte Muhme 

c. Love's Gifts 

Mr. Nicholas Douty 
Mr. Goepp 



Ph. H. Goepp 



Camille W. Zeckwer 



Moment Musical 
Etude 



Mr. Zeckwer 



6. Trio for Piano, Violin and Violoncello 

Arthur Foote 

Mr. Ellis C. Hammann 

Mr. Fred. Hahn 

Mr. Stanley Cauffman 



<rtt 



m 



Concert 

diver, bs tbe 

Hlutnnt Hssociation 
Jpbila&elpbta flftustcal Hca&cmi? 

1617 Spruce Street 

SatutBaE, Bprll 13tb, at 8 0. /IB. 



program 



OUARTETTE— Fingal's Cave . Mendelssohn 

Misses Hall and Murphv, Mrs. Stites and Mrs. Storv 



VOCAL— Mon 



eur s' ouvre ta voix . Saint Saens 

arason and Delilah) 
Miss Elizabeth Pattee 



3 VrOLIN SOLI— a Romance 
b Capriccio 

Mr. Emil F. Schmii 

I PIANO SOLI— a Prelude 

b Ich Liebe Dich 
c Witches' Dance 

Miss Elsa Mohr 



Caniille W. /rct», 



Chopin 

Grieg 

MacDowell 



Miss Pattee 



-: SONATA for Piano and Violin 

Miss Mohr and Mr. Schmidt 



DUO— a Brautlied 
b Marsch 
Misses Ai: 




. o 



SEASON OF 1901 



FREE ORGAN RECITALS 



I MiKl; Till' iUM'ICF.1 [IF Till 



American Organ Players' Club. 



TWENTY -FOURTH RECITAL 



CENTRAL CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH. 

18th and Green Streets, 



Saturday Afternoon, April 20, 1901, 

at 3.45 o'clock. 



PLAYED BY 

Me. FRANK N. OGLESBY, 
Organist of First M. E. Church, Germantown. 



Programs may be had at 1123 Chestnut Street, 

THE HENRY F. MILLER PIANO WAREROOMS, 

one week in advance of the date of each Recital. 



AMERICAN ORGAN PLAYERS' CLUB. 



Mr Richard ZeckwER, will deliver a free lecture oil " THE 
ORGAN; its Construction, and. the Acoustic Properties of Organ Pipes," 
it the Philadelphia Musical Academy, 1617 Spruce Street, Monday even- 
tig, April 29. 1901, at 8 o'clock. 

Members and their friends are very cordially invited to be present. 
Very Truly Yours, 

Wm. J. Bokiim. Mus. Par., 

Chairman Executive Committee. 
[41.3 X. iStri Street. 

Philadelphia, April 23, ujoi. 



WwA 



Ja'' 



■:■ 



List of Recitals for the Season of iooi. 

SATURDAYS, 3.45 P. M. TUESDAYS, 8.00 P. M. 



1. Sat., 

2. Sat., 

3. Sat., 

4. Sat., 

5. Sat., 



7. 



Jan. 5 
Jan. 12 
Jan. 19 
Jan. 20 
Feb. 2 
ay, Feb. 5 
Feb. 9 

8. Tuesday, Feb. 12 

9. Sat., Feb. 10 

10. Tuesday, Feb. 19 

11. Sat., Feb. 23 

12. Tuesday, Feb. 20 

13. Sat., March 2 

14. Tuesday, Mar. 5 

15. Sat., March 9 
10. Tuesday, Mar. 12 

17. Sat.. March 16 

18. Tuesday, Mar. 19 
19.. Tuesday, Mar. 26 

March 30 
lay, April 2 
April 6 
April 13 
April 20 
April 27 
WILLIAM . 



20. Sat. 

21 . Tuei 

22. Sat. 



24. Sat. 
2~>. Sat. 



Holy Trinity Church 
10th and Walnut Sts. 
First Baptist Church 

17th St. above Walnut St. 
St. James's Church 
22(1 and Walnut StB. 

First New Jerusalem Church 

22d and Chestnut Sts. 

Calvary Presbyterian Church 

Loeust St. above 15th St. 

St. Luke's Church, Germantown 

Main and Coulter Ste. 
St. Mark's Church 

Locust St. above 10th St. 

Wakefield Pres. Ch., Germantow 

Ormantown Ave. bel. Fisher's Lane. 

Church of the Holy Apostles 
21st and Christian Sts. 
First Presbyterian Ch., Germantr 
W. Chelten Ave. near Main St. 
First New Jerusalem Church 
22d and Chestnut Sts. 
Christ Memorial Ch. Ref. Epis. 
43d and Chestnut Sts. 
Central Congregational Church 
181 h and Green Sts. 
St. Mark's Lutheran Ch. 
Spring Garden St. above 13th St. 

The Temple 

Broad and Berks Sts. 

Park Ave. M. E. Church 

N. Pari! Ave. and Norris St. 
Hollond Memorial Church 

Broad and Federal Sts. 

St. P 



North Broad St. Pres. Church 



Philip H. Goepp 

Organist. 

Ellwood Beaver 

Organist. 

Geo. Alex. West 

Organist. 

Minton Pyne 

Organist. 

Prescott Adamson 
Organist. 

Miss May Porter 

Organist. 

Harold Nason 

Organist 

H. G. Thunder 

Ol'ganisl. 

Miss Ray Daniels 

Organist. 

Frederick Maxson 
Organist. 

Dr. J. M'E Ward 

Organist. 

Oscar H. Bilgram, 

Organist. 

Miss J. Carroll 

Organist. 

David E. Crozier 
Organist. 

Geo. S. Opp 

Organist. 

Chas. H. Wood 

Organist. 



Walter H. Ketley 
Organist. 

Miss Laura Wood 
Organist. 

Frank N. Oglesby 
Organist. 

William J. Boehm 



Central Ccmgivgnliimal I'hiuvh 
18th & Green Sts. 

Thb Temple 

Broad and Berks Sts. Organist. 

. BOEHM. Mus. Bac, Chairman Executive Committee. 
1413 N. 18th st.. Philadelphia. 



Organ Recital No. 179 



PROGRAM 



PLAYED B7 



MR. FRANK N. OGLESBY, 



Assisted by Miss Alice Baker, Violin. 



CONCERT FANTASIE A. Freyer 

BENEDICTION NUPTIALE A. Hollins 

VIOLIN SOLO, " Romance," J. Svensden 

SONATA, No 5 Alex. Guilmant 

Allegro Apnssionato, 

Adagio, 

Scherzo. 

MELODIE AND INTERMEZZO H. Parker 

VIOLIN SOLO, "Cavalina," J. Raff 

GAVOTTE MODERNE E. H. Lemare 

OFFERTOIRE DE ST. CECILE, No. I J. Grison 



Organ Recital No r8o, next Saturday afternoon, April 27, at 3.45 O'clock, 
The Temple, Broad and Berks Streets, and played by Mr. William J. Boehm, 
Mus. Bac, Organist Chambers- Wylie Memorial Presbyterian Church. 



MONDAY EVENING, APRIL 29. 

" THE ORGAN ; its Construction, and the Acoustic Properties of Organ Pipes." 

A Free Lecture by Mr. Richard Zeckwer, given under the auspices of the American 1 
Organ Playeis' Club, at the Philadelphia Musical Academy, 1617 Spruce Street. / 



Matinee Musical, Club 



Invitation Musical 



TUESDAY, APRIL TWENTY-THIRD 
EIGHT O'CLOCK 



525™ Concert 

given b?> Geacbeve of tbc 

IPhilabelpbia Musical Bcabcm^ 

at tbe ball, 1017 Spruce St. 

TMle&nes&aB Eve., dRap. 8tb, at Eigbt o'cloch 
jt jt jt 

(Programme 

TRIO for Piano, Violin and Violoncello— Op. i, No. i 

a Allegro Beethoven 

b Adagio cantabile 
c Scherzo 
d Finale 
Messes. L. Howe, C. Doell, R. Hennig 

VOCAL-« An die Musik . . . Schubert 

* Meine Liebe ist grun . . . Brahms 

MlSS M. BUEDINGER 

PIANO SOLO- Variations in C minor . . Beethoven 

Mr. George S. Kempton 

VIOLIN SOLO— Introduction, Thema and Variation 

Paganini-Wilhelmi 
Mr. C. Doell J 

VOCAL -The Lament. Egyptian song from Ben Hur Chadwick 

Miss M. Buedinger 
PIANO SOLO— Polonaise, op. 53 . . . Chopin 

Mr. G. Kempton 
PIANO DUO— m Suite for two Pianos . . Arensky 

Theme I Dialogue 

II Scherzo 

III Marche triumphale 

IV Menuet 

V Gavotte 

VI Valse 

VII Marche funebre 

VIII Nocturno 

IX Polonaise 

Messrs. Richard and Camille Zeckwer 

The Stelnway Grands are from N. Stetson & Co , 11,, Chestnut Street 

aomfesion = , ff[f tT , Centg 



* 



VliOG RAM 



TWO PIANOS— a-Serenade Gold mark 

b— Valse Carnivalesque, . . Chaminade 

Mrs. Lilian Briggs Fitz Maurice 
Mrs. Charles M. Taylor, Jr. 



VOCAL-a-At Twilight Nevin 

b— Open Thy Blue Eyes, .... Massenet 

Mrs. N. Hackett Cooper 



VIOLIN— Carmen Fantaise 

Mr. Friedrich Voelker 



VOCAL-Aria from Aida, . - Verdi 

Miss Lottie K. Garrison. 



PIANO— Magic Fire, Wagner-Brassin 

Mrs. H. Vance Peters 



PROGRAM 



VOCAL— a— Good Night, Beloved, Good Night, Jas. B. Oliver 
b— Creole Love Song, Edgar Belmont Smith 



Mr. Horace T. Dumont 



TWO PIANOS-III Suite, Op. 33 
Theme I Dialogue, 



Arensky 
VI Valse. 

II Scherzo, . . VII Marche Funebre. 
Ill Marche Triomphale, VIII Noeturno. 
IV Menuet, ■ . IX Polonaise. 

V Gavotte. 

Mr. Ricard Zeckwer 
Mr. Camille Zeckwer 



VOCAL— From Out Thine Eyes, .,. . 

Mrs. N. Hackett Cooper 



Ries 



VIOLIN— a— Romanze, 

b— Perpetual Motion, 



Chopin-Wilhelmji 
Paganini 



Mr. Friedrich Voelker 



525™ Concert 

given bs Heacbers of tbc 

fl>bilabelpbia flDustcal Hcabem^ 

at tbc ball, 1617 Spruce St. 

TWleOnesdas Eve., fling 8tb, at Efgbt o'clock 
jt jt jt 

(Programme 

TRIO for Piano, Violin and Violoncello— Op. i, No. i 

a Allegro Beethoven 

b Adagio cantabile 

d Finale 
Messrs. L. Howe, C. Doell, R. Hennig 

VOCAL-a An die Musik . . . Schubert 

b Meine Liebe ist grun . . . Brahms 

Miss M. Buedinger 

PIANO SOLO- Variations in C minor . Beethoven 

Mr. George S. Kempton 

VIOLIN SOLO— Introduction, Thema and Variation 

Paganini-Wilhelmi 
Mr. C. Doell 

VOCAL -The Lament. Egyptian song from Ben Hur Chadwick 

Miss M. Buedinger 
PIANO SOLO-Polonaise, op. 53 . . . chopin 

Mr. G. Kempton 
PIANO DUO-III Suite for two Pianos . . Arensky 

Theme I Dialogue 

II Scherzo 

III Marche triumphale 

IV Menuet 

V Gavotte 

VI Valse 

VII Marche funebre 

VIII Nocturno 

IX Polonaise 

Messrs. Richard and Camille Zeckwer 

The Stelnway Grands ore from N. Stetson & Co , 1111 Chestnut Street 

Homlsston = = jfiftg aents 



v 



526$ Concert 



<5iven brj pupils (UntermcOlate 2>ept.) 



pbilabelpbia flDustcal Bcabem\> 

at tbefr Wall, 1617 Spruce St. 

jfrtDag Eve., flfcag lOtb, at Eigbt o'cIocr 



programme 



DUET— Merry Hour March 

Misses C. Esherick, G. Rosenbaun 


Gurlitt 


SOLO — Hungarian Dream 

Miss K. Frankkl 


Faber 


DUO— Rondo Scherzando 

Misses F. Summers, S. Williamson 


Gurlitt 


SOLO— Barcarole .... 
Miss C. Lorrigan 


Mohr 


QUARTETTE— Kinder Marsch 

Misses I. Taber, L. Wilson, E. Hetherington, R. 


. Schubert 
Longenecker 


SOLO— Hearts and Flowers . 

Miss E. Miller 


. Tobani 


SONATE C Major .... 
Miss R. Whiteside 


Mozart 


SOLO— Magic Flute . 

Miss F. Tillinghast 


. Czerny 


DUET— Under the Lindens . 

Misses E. Rivard, M. Dennis 


Hiller 


SOLO— Sonate .... 
Miss A. Walker 


Mozart 


SOLO— On the Meadows 

Miss L. Elliot 


. Lichner 


SOLO— In the Quiet Evening Hours . 

Miss H. Johnson 


Keller 


QUARTETTE— Hochzeitsmarsch 

Misses B. Bower, M. Lear, M. Hill, E. M 


Goldmark 
ili.er 


SOLO— Curious Story 

Miss L. Wilson 


Heller 


SOLO -Natalie .... 
Miss A. Krueger 


Macy 


SOLO— Rondino 

Mr. A. Wolf 


Mohr 


QUARTETTE— March 

Misses A. Walker, A. Croke, E. Tustin, M. 


Boekelmann 
Reinhold 


SOLO— (J Slumber Song 
b The Fiddler 

Master S. Sterritt 


. Gurlitt 


SOLO— Butterflies .... 
Miss E. Hetherington 


Lege 


SOLO— Sonatine .... 
Miss K. Krause 


. Lichner 


QUARTETTE— Parade Review 

Misses A. Box. L. Eshleman, A. Rorke and Mr. 


Engelmann 
M. Percival 



52V* Concert 

<Biv>en E>v> pupils of tbe flntermeofate Sept. 

of tbc 

fl>btlaodpbia flfcustcal Hcabem^ 

Saturoag afternoon, Aavj ntb, at 2.30 p. /as. 

at (Bciffitb JHall, 1420 Cbeotnut St. 



526™ Concert 

Siren bv. pupils Cflnterme&iate ©ept.) 



pbilaoelpbta flIMistcal Hcabem^ 


at tbetr Wall. 1617 Spruce St. 




ffrt&as Eve., iT&ag lOtb, at Eigbt o'cloch 


jt j* jt 




programme 




DUET— Merry Hour March 

Misses C. Esherick, G. Rosenba 


. Gurlitt 


SOLO — Hungarian Dream 

Miss K. Frankel 


Faber 


DUO— Rondo Scherzando 

MrssES F. Summers, S. Williams 


Gurlitt 


SOLO— Barcarole .... 
Miss C. Lokrigan 


Mohr 


QUARTETTE— Kinder Marsch 

Misses I. Taber, L. Wilson, E. Hetherington, 


. Schubert 
R. LONGENECKER 


SOLO— Hearts and Flowers . 

Miss E. Miller 


Tobani 


SONATE C Major .... 
Miss R. Whiteside 


Mozart 


SOLO— Magic Flute .... 
MISS F. TlLLINGHAST 


. Czerny 


DUET— Under the Lindens . 

Misses E. Rivard, M. Dennis 


Hiller 


SOLO— Sonate .... 
Miss A. Walker 


. Mozart 


SOLO— On the Meadows 

Miss L. Elliot 


. Lichner 


SOLO— In the Quiet Evening Hours . 

Miss H. Johnson 


Keller 


QUARTETTE— Hochzeitsmarsch 

Missus B. Bower, M. Lear, M. Hill, E. 


Goldmark 
Miller 


SOLO— Curious Story 

Miss L. Wilson 


Heller 


SOLO— Natalie .... 
Miss A. Krueger 


Macy 


SOLO— Rondino .... 
Mr. A. Wolf 


Mohr 


QUARTETTE— March 

Misses A. Walker, A. Croke, E. Tustin, IV 


Boekelmann 
. Reinhold 


SOLO— a Slumber Song 
b The Fiddler 

Master S. Sterritt 


Gurlitt 
Engelmann 


SOLO— Butterflies .... 
Miss E. Hetherington 


Lege 


SOLO— Sonatine .... 
Miss K. Krause 


. Lichner 


QUARTETTE— Parade Review 
Misses A. Box, L. Eshleman, A. Rorke and M 


Engelmann 
r. M. Percival 


The Steinway Pianos arc from N. Stetson 6: Co.. nil 


Chestnut Street 



programme 



DUO— Melody in F .... Rubinstein 

' Misses E. Jackson and M. Campbell 

SOI 0— My first repertoire March . . Engelmann 

Miss E. Corlies 

DUET— Canneu .... Engelmann 

Misses L. Christenson and B. Parker 

SOIiO — Rondo Scherzando .... Mohr 
Miss M. Parsons 

DUET— Fmehlingsmarch . . . Tutschek 

Miss S. Loughran and Mr. H. Wolstenkolme 

SOLO— Minuet 



Miss E. Scott 

SOLO — Hungarian Dreams 

Miss L. Denny 

SOLO — Heatherrose . 

Miss M. Williams 
SOLO— Through Fields and Woods 

Miss H. Richards 



SOLO— The Clock 
DUET— La Gondola 



Miss B. Clayton 



Misses M. Blackwood and E. LE Boutillier 

SOLO — Joyous Peasant 

Miss G. Rhoads 

DUO — Hungarian Dance, for Piano and Violin 

Misses D. Simmons and R. Wellenbach 

DUET— Through Field and Forest 

Misses R. Moore and M. Laurence 

SOLO — Spring Song 

Miss M. Hill 

TRIO— Husaren March 

Misses Mi Wilson, M. Nathanson, Master J. Rue 

CHORUS— a Winter Flowers .... Moffat 
b Over the Meadows . . . Gatty 

SOLO — Mignonette .... Lichner 

Master S. Hurlbert 

-Serenade .... Schubert 

Miss I. Ferris 



Mozart 

Faber 

Lange 

Giese 

Rathbun 

Biedermann 

Schumann 

Papini 

Vogel 

. Merkel 

. Gurlitt 



Gurlitt 



Aletten 



SOLO— In the Green Meadow . 

Miss F. Winch 

SOLO— Slumber Song 

Master F. Ely 
SOLO— Lovely Springtime 

Master O. Quinto 

QUARTETTE— Over Hill and Dale . . Engelmann 

Misses K. Frankel, M. McGarity, a. Kruger, K. Krause 

SOLO— The Lily . . . . Waddington 

Miss E. Green 

Grieg 



DUET — Norwegian Dance 

Misses E. Heritage and M. Kirk 
SOLO — Dance Humoresque 

Miss R. Wellenbach 

SOLO— Butterflies .... 



SOLO— Polka 



Miss M. Bird 



Miss a. Semplk 



. Dennee 
Lege 

Mohr 

Krogmann 

. Heller 
Gade 



SOLO— Santa Claus Guards 

Miss E. Stevenson 

SOLI— a Curious Story 

b Boy's Dance ^H_ 

Master D. Castellucio 

SOLO DUET— Promenade Gavotte . . Engelmann 

Miss M. Parsons and Master L. Smith 

TOY ORCHESTRA— A Merry Sleighride . . Chwatal 

Piano . . Master A. Schwartz and Miss F, Winch 
ist Violins . Misses D. Simmons and M. Opdyke, 

Master I. Roseneeld 
2d Violins . MiSS M. Pennypacker and T. Ohstf.r- 

HELDT 

Violoncello . Master J. Zeckwer 

Schellen . Miss E. Stevenson 

Schlitten . Miss B. Clayton 

Peitsche- . . Master Fred Ortlieb 

Triangle . . Miss E. Jackson 

Trommel . . Master O. Quinto 

Trompete . Master D. Castellucio 

Castagnetten . Miss R. Wellenbach 

Knallbuechse . Master F. Ely 

Zecher . . Miss H. Fleck 

Kammtrompete ist Miss M. Wilson 

Kammtrompete 2d Miss T. NiCHTERLEiN 

The Steinway Grands are from N. Stetson & Co , nil Chestnut Street 



Tenth Concert 




QIVEH BY THE FUFILS OF TH 



Germantown Branch 

OF THE 

Philadelphia Musical Academy 

(Mill SEE FINISHING DEPARTMENTS) 



Friday, May 31, 1901 

Ei § hto ' dock Association Hall 

Main hnd Rittenhouse Streets 
qekmhntown 



530 tb Concert 



pbtlabelpbta flfeustcal Bcabem^ 



(Sraouates of 1901 



fmusical ifuiit 1ball, Stb an;* Uocust Streets 



dfconOas Evening, dlias 27tb, at S o'clocf? 



m*/m 



■V 



rr~_ — ~__ 

Are Now Finished Musicians 
F unJ H :' list night wns 

icrelses at 

'be PLI! i i, :■.: i Academy, „,„] the 



musicians graduat: 



srt Preceded 



r" 

lladel- 



Exercis 

:he Philadelphia Academy, 
graduating class of the Phllad 
Musical Academy held Its com- 
ment exercises in Musical Fund 
last night. 

distribution of certificates was pre-! 
""" b 5' a carefully arranged prtj 
received with mark- 
ed enthusiasm. The programme was 
' "mnn,-.- ( -j of fourteen selections from the 
lection elicited 



opened with Moszkowskl - 



enthusla; 
The coi 
"Foreign Parts." This 

tlfully rendered by the orchestra from 
the Philadelphia Musical Academy The 
orchestras Interpretation of Emll 
Sauer's concerto. E minor (first move- 
menti. was particularly good. During 
ihis selection fhe or.-hestra was ably 
supported by Miss Mazle E. Culley at 
the piano. 



A 



PROGRAM 



SYMPHONY CLASS Overture, Eieuzi, 

Misses Caveny, Bullus, Mrs. L. Bland and Mr. 



VOCAL 



PIANO 



a Persian Song 
b Within My Heart 
Miss Makgaretta Bullus 

a Simple Aveu 
b Serenade Badmc 
Miss Elsie Nice 



Wagner 



Burmeuier 
Bungert 



Thome 
Gabriel-Marie 



Bohm 



PIANO DUO Two Scenes from "Birthday Music 

Misses Lucia adamson and Katharine Thompson 

™ ™i« Godard 

PIANO « g-^g gong Wagner-^ndler 

Miss Florence Bisel 

PI WO DUO Bonate (First Movement) M° zart 

Misses Hattie DeKrafft and Edna Sowden 

a Aria from "Persian Garden" 

b Secret Greetings 

Mrs. Cuas. Klauder 



VOCAL 



Miss Mary Homiller 

o Bagatelle ~) 
b Minuett \- 
c Tarantelle) 
Joseph Clark 

a Nocturne 

b March from Tannhaeuser 
Mr. F. Stoer 

a Henry, the Fowler 

b I Love Thee 

Miss Luella Lake 

Concerto (first movement) 

Miss Margaretta Bullus 

Concerto (first movement) 

Miss Florence Caveny 



Lehman 
Fielits 



Lebbrandt 
Bendel 



Ph. Schanuenka 



Chopin 
Wagner 



Loeive 
Grieg 



C. W. Zeekwer 






7 CLASS 



Mr. Emil F. Schmidt (teacher) 

Pas des Cymbales 

Misses Caveny and Bullus 

Aria from "Le Cid" 

Miss Ethel Upjohn 

Wedding March 



Mr. 7. BTOER, Mrs. L. Bland, Misses Caveny and Bullus 



STEINWAY PIANOS USED 



"THE GERMANTOWN BRANCH of the well-known Philadel- 
1 phia Musical Academy was opened fourteen years ago by Mr. 
Richard Zeekwer., The curriculum includes all branches of music, 
and the teachers are all well-known artists in their profession. 

Being the only Conservatory in Germantown, it offers advan- 
tages to its students that they could not possibly obtain by private 
teaching. 

The class system taught in this Academy is adopted, not be- 
cause it is the cheapest; but because it is the best manner of en- 
couraging interest and ambition in the student. Many other 
advantages are also offered through the many lessons given them 
gratuitously, such as Theory, Symphony and Ensemble Classes, etc. 

The school is now under the direction of Mr. Camille W. 
Zeekwer, who is desirous to sustain and increase its reputation. 

There are accommodations for 500 pupils. The classes re- 
open September the second, 1901. 
For circulars apply to 



Camille V. Zeckver, 

PROPRIETOR Sffi DIRECTOR 
6029 MAIN STREET, GERMHNTOVN 



pupils ©rcbestra. 



violins :— 
Miss A. Baker, 

Miss R. Jackson, 
Mr. R. Young, 

Mr. W. Abendroth, 
Mr. O. Wittich, 
Mr. O. Koelbel, 
MissC. Heck, 
Miss F. Sivel, 

Miss F. Warren, 

Miss M. Pennypacker, 
Miss T. Osterheldt, 
Miss M. Obdyke, 

Miss M. Zeckwer. 

violas— Mr. L. Freemann, Mr. E. Schmidt (Teacher). 
violoncelli— Marie Brehm, Mr. S. Cauffmann, Mr. W. Schmidt, 
Mr. A. Hassler. 

double basses— Mr. J. Fasshauer (Teacher), Mr. G. Merrill. 

flutes— Miss A. Beekman. 

oboes— Miss S. Gilbert. 

clarinf.TTES— Miss E. Mohr. 

bassoons— Miss B. McNab. 

horns— Miss E- Funk. 

trumpets— Miss L> Berry. 

Trombones— Miss J. Catanach. 

timpani— Mr. C. Bawden. 

great drum— Mr. E. Crouthers. 

triangle— Miss H. Carpenter. 

tambourin— Miss M. Culley. 

cymbals— Mr. Walter Golz. 

SMALL drum— Mr. Joseph Clark 



programme. 



Germany, from " Foreign Parts " 

Pupils Orchestra 
Under the direction of Prof. Carl Samaus 

PIANO SOLO— a Etude op., 10 Nr. 5 
b Si j'etais oiseau 

Miss Mary L. Mills 



Moszkowski 



Chopin 
Henselt 



CONCERTO, C minor, For Piano and Orchestra, 

a Largo, b Rondo , . Beethoven 

Miss Anna Gause and Orchestra 

PIANO SOLO — Fantasie — Impromptu C sharp minor . Chopin 
Miss Frances A. Pugh 

CONCERTO D minor, op. 40, 2d and 3d movement Mendelssohn 

For Piano and Orchestra 

Miss Ottilie Pahl and Orchestra 

VOCAL— « An Die Musik .... Schubert 
b The Bondmaid .... Lalo 

Miss Lou Bennett 

CONCERTO, E minor (first movement) . Emil Sauer 

For Piano and Orchestra 

Miss Mazie E. Culley and Orchestra 

PIANO SOLO— Scherzo, op. 31 Chopin 

Miss Grace Houseman 

CONCERTO (first movement) . . C. W. Zeckwer 

For Piano and Orchestra 

Miss Florence Caveny and Orchestra 

PIANO SOLO— Impatience . . C. W. Zeckwer 

The Receiver of the Gold Medal 

distribution of diplomas, teachers certificates 
and gold medals 

ORCHESTRA— Spanish from " Foreign Parts " . Moszkowski 

The Steinway Grand Piano is from N. Stetson & Co Chestnut Street 



m nr 



i 



/i 






534^ Concert... 

Given bg the Ladg TeaChCTS of the 

Philadelphia Musical Academy 

with the assistance of 

MR. HOWARD P. RATTAY, Violinist 

at 

Their Hall, 1617 Spruce St. 
Saturday, DecemDer 7th, 1901, at Eight o'clock 



PIANO DUO-WALZER 



Misses A. Su 
VOCAL SOLO-ARIA ST. PAUL 



-Sonata for piano and violin 



(c) Scherzo 




W Adagio Allegro con spirito 




Miss E. Mohr and Mr. Howard F. Rat 


tay 


piano solo— Concert stuck 


Weber 


Miss B. S. Davis 








Miss A. Hall 




ORGAN SOLO-TWO CHORALS NOS. 24 AND 16 


Bach 


Miss V. Henderson 




VOCAL SOLO-W Je ne veux pas autre chose . 


Widor 


(«) Lament 




Miss Marie Buedinger 




PIANO QUARTETTE-SLAVISCHE TANZE 


Dvorak 


Misses A. Hall and S. C. Sower 




L. F. Corbin and L. Tiers 





535 tb (Concert 

Slven bs PupllS of the 

jpbflabdpbia Ofiusical Bcafcem^ 

GueeOag Evening, H>ecember lOtb, at 8 o'cloch 

at tbclr Wall 1617 Spruce Cttcce 



lptogramme 



PIANO— Liebeswalz 



Mr. J. Clark 



VOCAL— Pleu 



Mazenet 
C. Schroeder 
an" Liszt 



VOCAL — a Thou art like unto flower 
b My lover is a weaver 

Miss F. Hinkle 


R. Zeckwer 
Hildach 


PIANO— Concertstiick 

Mr. E. Crowthers 


Weber 


VIOLIN— a Air 

b Perpetual Motion 

Mr. L. Freemann 


Bach 
Bohm 


VOCAL— a Canzonetta 
b Memento 

Miss L. Lake 


Salvatore Rosa 
Peter Cornelius 


PIANO— Rondo capriccio . 

Miss C. Wilkins 


Mendelssohn 


PIANO— La Fileuse 

Miss B. Koerper 


Raff 


VIOLIN— Finale, from 7th Concerto . 
Mr. M. Kirk 


Rode 


VOCAL— Men coeur d 'ouvre a ta voix 


Saint Saens 


Miss M. Zeckwer 




PIANO— Sonata apassionata (2d and 3d mo 
Mr. W. HeidER 


•ement) Beethoven 


ORGAN— Fugue 

Miss K. O'Donnel 


Rheinberger 


VOCAL— Pur dicesti, bocca bella 

Miss Gr. Watson 


Lotti 



VIOLIN QUARTETTE— Introduction et Valse, op. 
Mr. M. Kirk, Miss M. Zeckwer, Messrs. 
L. Frekmann, \V. AuendorTh 



■ Stelnway Grand* 1 



H 






rU 

(^ oncect... 
Hlumni association 

of tbe 

fl>bilaodpbla flUustcal Hcaoemp 
Saturoag Et>enfrtfl, Dec. 14, 1901 

at 8 o'clock 

1617 Spruce St. 



programme 



Sonatk for Piano and Violin— C Minor 
Messrs C. W. Zeckwer, H. Rattai 



Vocal— Berceuse 



Miss I. Nachod 



Grieg 

Godard 



Piano- (a) Toccato .... C ha,ninadc 

WToccato .... Paradise 

« Prelude, C Minor . . . Rachmaninoff 

Miss Florence Caveny 



Gade 



Violin— Capriccio 



Mr. Howard F. Rattay 



Piano Duo-Pas des Cymbales . . Chaminade 

Misses F. Caveny, M. Bullus 



Mozart 



Vocal— II Re Pastore 

Miss Nachod 
(Violin Obligato . . JM Ratiay) 

Quartette— Slavische Tanze . Dvorak 

Misses A. Hall, S. Sower, L. Corbin, £. Tiers 



\£t 



If 



j^.7 



Manuscript Music Society 

of Philadelphia 
Eleventh Season 

FIRST 
PRIVATE CONCERT 



THE ORPHEUS ROOMS 

1520 Chestnut Street 



Wednesday Evening, December Eighteenth 

at quarter-pasl-eighl 





/ 

X . U 




PROGRAM 



l Trio for Piano, Violin and 'Cello 

Constantin von Sternberg 
I Allegro Comedo 
. Andante Cantabile 
J Allegro Con Brio 

CONSTANTIN VON STERNBERG, Piano 
FREDERICK E. HAHN, Violin 
WILLIAM EBANN, 'Cello 



2 Songs ...... Garrett W. Thompson 

a "Du bist wie cine Blume" 



MR. FERRARI 



b " A Bolero " 

c " Love's Reverie " 



mrs. Mccormick 



3 Six Characteristic Pieces for Piano 
(Op. 4) 

a "Fairy Tale" 
b "On the Play Ground" 
c "Spinning Wheel" 
d "'Barcarola" 
e "Notturno" 

f "Serenade of the Marionettes" 
HENRY A. LANG 



Henry A. Lang 



4 Songs 



Frederick E. Hohn 



a "The Violet" 

b "A Wedding Melody" 

c "Come Again to Me" 

MRS. MARIE KUNKEL-ZIMMERMAN 



5 Suite for Violin and Piano 



Camille W. Zeckiver 



FREDERICK E. HAHN 
ELLIS CLARK HAMMANN 



mvmtfr G^uty 




Uwelfth 

Annual Sleeting 



HELD IN THE 



Academy of Music and Academy Hall 
Reading, Pa. 

Wecemtfei" &€, £7 ant/ J><P 



lQOl 



PHILADELPHIA A1USIC TEACHERS' ASSOCIATE 
Recital and Lecture 

Monday Evening:, January 20th, 1902, at 8 o'clock 

Held by ihc courtesy of Mb. Richard Zbckwbr. at his 

PHILADELPHIA MUSICAL ACADEMY 

1017 SPRUCE STREET 



1 Chestnut Street. 

Respectfully, 

Edmund Wolsieffer, Seer, -r,-., ,;., 

n 17 Chestnut Street, 
teg" Please show this Card at the door. 



. 




PROGRAM. 




. SONATE for Piano and Violin, 

" C minor," 
MR. CA.VvILLE ZECKWER and MR. H 


"'Grieg. 

Rattay. 


. VOCAL, "Ah figlinoi," (11 Profeta 
Miss L. Lake. 


~Mty'erbetr. 


. PIANO, "Concertstiick,"" ' 

Miss L. Corbin. 


CA.imi,,,,,/,. 


. VOCAL, (a.)" Memento," 

(/'.) " Cradle Song," 

Miss L. Lake. 


CorildillS. 

Wepltoviski. 


. VIOLIN SOLO, " Capriccio,'. 
Mr. Howard Rattay. 


'- 'Ga,1 r . 


. LECTURE, " A scientific inves 

Touch, illustrated t>v 

of stereopticon views 

MR. RICHARD ZECKWER. 


igation of 
.a number 


NOTICE. Every member of the P. M. T. Asso 

Jiu'uclur'^ I'l ii" .«'.h is '.".'till 


is earnestly 
sting Recital 

held Monday 



Philadelphia Music T 

Mrs. Mary Gregory Murray Pniidmt I 



•hers' Association. 

...Program fjommitti.... . . 

IRS. J. C. Meacham. Chairman, 

10 South 18th Slr.ct. (Flilh-r Btii 
■ i)th Street. 
iESTOCK, 
mo Chestnut < 



Mrs. Virginia 



Philadelphia, 1st. of January, 1002. 

PAPER: "The Musical Poems of Browning." DR. HUGH A. CLARKE. 
SONGS : MRS. RUSSELL KING MlLLER-IBrowning Poems set h 



VIOLIN SOLO: 



•Mrs. H. A. Beach) 



l/i I, / T ' " ""' ^'" '■"'"" «iH lv lield. hy ||„. uiurtesv of Mr 

o "J?, u-tfv . <U T r ' "'I'"" Sl ' 11 "," 1 - "" 7 S|,r "'" S| "' H ' "" *""■'■" - ',1,",' ' 
w;^^Ke t l h ers r a! , e S e s n p e e , c / iir, C y tl i r n e vi^d: ^"^ '"^^ ° f T A^ 
Respectfully, 

EDMUND WOLSIEFFER, Sec'y-Treas., ,,, 7 Chestnut St. 



T> 



PHILADELPHIA'S LEADING MUSICAL COLLEGE 



1329=1331 S. Broad Street 




m* l 

GILBERT RAYNOLDS COMBS, Director 

Private and Class Instruction in all Branches by a Faculty of 55 Artist Teacheis 



Music, Dramatic Art, Modern Languages, Piano Toning ^ 
Residence Department fc>r Young Ladies 

A sound musical education Jrorn the foundation to post-graduate and Normal 

work. Ih viirums .Up:i,lnu-iHs under the pergonal ,!!,., •- 
tion of the following eminent masters: 

Gilbert Raynolds Combs, Piano Department 

Henry Schradieck, Violin Department 

Hugh A. Clarke, Mus. Doc, Theoretical Department 

Herbert Wilber Greene, Vocal Department 

Henry Ludlam, Dramatic Art 



Illustrated Catalogu 







(Founded July 5, 



EDWARD A. BERG, President, Reading 
EDMUND WOLSIEFFER, Secretary and Treasurer, Philadelphi; 



<Bxtcutii)t Committee 

William Benbow, Chairman, Reading 
O. H. Unger, Reading E. L. Fulmer, Reading 



program Committee 

A. W. Borst, Chairman, Philadelphia 
Winton J. Baltzell, Philadelphia Clement A. Marks, Allentown 



($ubifm0 Committee 



Philip H. Goepp, Chairman, Philadelphia 
Miss Kate H. Chandler, Phila. F. Worcester Worrell, Phila. 



TWELFTH ANNUAL MEETING 

Academy of Music and Academy Hall 

Thursday, Friday and Saturday, Dec. 26, 27 and 28, 1901 

Beginning at 2 p.m. Dec. 26 and ending at noon Dec. 2S 



n 



(3reetfno- 



The music in my lieart I bore 
Long after it was heard no more. 

—Wordsworth. 

But the great Master said, "I see 

No best in kind, but in degree ; 

I gave a various gift to each, 

To charm, to strengthen, and to teach." 

—Longfellow. 



T seems peculiarly fitting that during 
the celebration of the nativity, when 
the era of ' ' peace on earth, good will 
toward men," was proclaimed by 
angelic choirs, the representatives of the divine 
art should come together for communion, edi- 
fication, and recreation. It is, therefore, our 
pleasant duty, on behalf of the citizens of 
Reading, to extend a hearty welcome to the 
members and friends of the Pennsylvania State 
Music Teachers' Association, with the hope 
that their stay among us may be as pleasant to 
them as it undoubtedly will prove profitable to 
us. Nine years have passed since this repre- 
sentative body of artists held its sessions in 
our midst ; but we believe that the seed sown 
on that occasion has been bearing fruit ever 
since, in a broader and more intelligent appre- 
ciation of the higher forms of musical art. 



(Qectption Committee 



Miss Josephine F. Ancona 


Mr. A. Raymond Bard 


Mrs. P. S. Braucher 


Mr. William Benbow 


Mrs. Edward H. Knerr 


Mr. P. S. Braucher 


Miss Annie E. Kemp 


Mr. John H. Bridenbaugh 


Miss M. Edith KeppeiiMann 


Mr. A. Cort 


Miss K. Laura Mengel 


Mr. C. V. Fencii, 


Miss Lizzie I. McGowan 


Mr. S. K. Geissler 


Miss Dora E. Miller 


Mr. W. E. Gery 


Miss Ada C. Owen 


Mr. Edward H. Knerr 


Miss Lydia R. Painter 


Mr. C. L. Koch 


Miss Loretta C. Reiley 


Mr. S. S. Mosser 


Miss Mary L. Snyder 


Mr. John G. McGowan 


Mrs. W. A. Um stead 


Mr. Carl Moter 


Miss Emma M. Zieber 


Mr. Edward Pengelly 


Mrs. S. W. TJnger 


Mr. Daniel F. Yost 




Mr. S. W. Unger 



Hdwards' Temple of Music 



414 Penn Street 



Imitating none, but possessing individual qualities which 
make this the most desirable Piano House in Eastern Penna. 




C. W. EDWARDS' MUSIC STORE 



The A. B. CHASE, 



Our Leader. The most scientifically constructed 
Piano in the World. Resulting in PURITY and 
CHARACTER OF TONE, SYMPATHETIC 
and RESPONSIVE TOUCH. Beauty and mod- 
erness of cases. Inspection invited .*. .-. .-. 



EDWARDS' TEMPLE OF MUSIC 
414 Penn Street, Reading, Pennsylvania 



..PROGRAM.. 

Academy Hall 

Thursday, December 26, 1901 



2.00 P.M. 

Business Session 
Introductory Remarks by the President, . Mr. Edward A. Berg 
Report of the Secretary, . . Mr. Edmund Wolsieffer 

Reports of the County Vice-Presidents 
Selection of the next Annual Meeting Place 
Appointment of the Committee on Nominations 



\L 



3.30 P.M. 

ESSAY, .... Mr. Frederic A. Law, Philadelphia 

Subject— "A Distinctive Note in American Vocal Teaching" 

Discussion 

Soprano Solo— " Mon coeur s' ouvre a ta voix" (Samson and Dalila), 

Saint-Saens 
Miss Marie Zeckwer 

ESSAY, . . . Hugh A. Clarke, Mus. Doc, Philadelphia 

SubjecT; — " Tonality in Modern Harmony" 

Discussion 

Soprano Solos — a " Florian's Song," .... Godard 

b "My Love," .... Camille Zeckwer 

Miss Marie Zeckwer 



AUMAN 

Funeral Director 

AND EMBALMER 

24 INorth Third Street 

READING, PENNA. 



Finest Funeral Cars and Carriages furnished in the City 
'phone. 



SEND TO US FOR 

The How 




The Why I 

(Life Insurance in Brief) MI 

USED BY THE DREXEL INSTITUTE • iM. \A £ T TTl*.! 

AND PEIRCE SCHOOL. |.ipW |,M W% *-»AX £1 

We furnish the Best Forms ef ||Jjflf j -I* V-HHR l^-J^" 

Insurance at Lowest 1'ossil.le Cost, BMml LfiMlZ" ^"~*ild££ 

Protection, Investment and Evfcry- WM WigBflK?^ 1 IcllRnr _j 

thing between, so as to surely meet W hwllW**ugS.\\\? V ■'■ 
your special need. Send us your ' ' :l 

Name, Age and Address. 

About $60, 000,000.00 of New Bus- 
iness Written annually. 

LIGHT & HIUU 

General Agents PENN MUTUAL LIFE, 

35 North Sixth Street, Reading, P a . 




..PROGRAM.. 

Academy Hall 

Thursday, December 26, 1901 



8 P.M. 

ANALYTICAL PIANOFORTE RECITAL 
By Dr. Henry G. Hanchett, New York City 
Subject— 
"The Classical and Romantic Schools of Composition ; their Develop- 
ment and Contrasts" 
Vocalist, Miss Mary R. Denton, New York City 

PROGRAM OF ILLUSTRATIONS 

G Minor Organ Fantasie, .... 

Andante in B Flat, op. 62, "Consolation,". 
"The Adieu," First Movement from Sonata in E flat, op. 
Canzone— "Voi die sapete" (Le Nozze di Figaro), 



Bach-Liszt 

Dussek 

Beethoven 



Fantasie in Sonata-Form, op. 5, . 

Allegro Romanza 



Songs— a "The Dream," 
b "The Asra," 



Mozart 
Saran 



Scherzo Finale 



. Chopin 
. Schumann 
Wagner-Liszt 



Second Ballade, op. 38,* . . . . . 

" Bird as a Prophet," from " Forest Scenes," op. 82, No. 7, 

Lohengrin's Reproof to Elsa. . . . . 

Feu Follet (Will o' the Wisp), ..... Prudent 

Galop Chromatique, . . . . . . . Liszt 

♦Argument— Hark ! the song I knew in childhood ! How it brings back the days of 
innocence and joy. How stra> gely it recalls the scenes, the friends, the maiden dearest 
of all, so long forgotten. Ah, me ! 

What! 'tis years since then. And such years! Storm, strife, sin, pain, poverty, 
passion, doubt, defeat. It makes ine wild to think of it all. Let me dream again of the 
peace, the purity, the sweetness, the sunshine of longago. O howl yearned andstruggled 
even then for virtue and the conquest of her heart, only to be repelled Again and again 
hope rose, but achievement eluded. At last came the plunge into the vortex— all the long- 
ings of youth abandoned, all the restraints of lo e and tenderness cast off. Now, too late, 
the terror oi remorse seizes upon me I tremble at the thought of retribution ; and the 
old song is but a lament, a mere reminder of what might have been. H. G. H„ 

The Steiuway Grand Piano used 



10 P.M. 

SOCIAL RECEPTION 

for all Visiting Members and Resident Active Members of the 

Association in the Banquet Hall. 



O. H. Ungkr. 



S. W. Unger. 



Established 1870. 




O. H. Unger <S Son 

PIANOS 

AND 

ORGANS 

115 North Sixth St., Reading, Pa. 



Musical Merchandise 

Sheet Music 

Publishers of Music 

Teachers of 

Piano, Violin, 'Cello, Voice, 

Counterpoint and Fugue. 






PIANOS 

Mason & Hamlin 

Steck 

Ivers & Pond 

Strich & Zeidler 

McPhail 

Ludwig, Heller 

Augustus Baus 

Smith & Barnes 

Willard 

ORGANS 

Mason & Hamlin 



We Sell on the Installment Plan 



..PROGRAM.. 

Academy Hall 

Friday, December 27, 1901 



9 A.M. 

General Business 
Report of Committee on Nomination of Officers 

9.30 A.M. 

. . . . Mr. Wieeiam Benbow, Reading 

Subject— " The Level of the Student" 
Discussion 

. Mr. Enoch W. Pearson, Philadelphia 

Director of Music iu Public Schools, Philadelphia 
Subject — "Public School Music as a Basis for Private 
Instrumental Instruction" 



11 A.M. 

ROUND TABLE TALKS 
Pianoforte — "Mechanical Adjuncts for the Player" 

Chairman, Vivian Ingee, Philadelphia 

Organ — " Registration " 

Chairman, Frankein E. CrESSON, Philadelphia 

Voice— " Criticism— Feeling and Expression— Handel's Arias as Studies 
Chairman, H. S. Kirkeand, Philadelphia 



Philadelphia musical Academy 

1617 Spruce Street 



33rd 
SEASON 



The Oldest Successful School of Music 

Private and Class Lessons in all Branches of Music 

Terms, $7.50 to $30 

..Instructors.. 



Piano— R. Zeckwer, A. Hennig, 
C. Samans, L. Howe, W. Leps, 
Camille Zeckwer, George Kemp- 
ton, Misses S. Sower, A. Sutor, 
B. Davis, V. Henderson, A. Hall, 
M. Walker, R. Mohr, L. Corbin. 

Janko Piano — L. Howe. 
ViorjN— Howard Rattay; 



Organ— D. Wood, L. Howe, W. 

Leps. 
Viounceli-o— R. Hennig. 
Vocal— Mr. H. S. Kirkland, Miss 

M. Budinger. 

Sight-Singing— Mr. R. Zeckwer. 
Theory— R. and C. Zeckwer. 



Teachers' and Pupils' Concerts in our own Concert Hall. 
Hook and Hastings Church Organ, blown by electric motor. 



•'or particulars apply to 



RICH. ZECKWER, Director 



tt)C Bip 




Things that come under our line of trade can be 
found in our store. You can get anything you 
want in our line at very low prices, quality con- 
sidered. 

McQOWAN, 630 Penn Street 

Y. M. C. A. BUILDING 



..PROGRAM.. 

Academy of Music 

Friday, December 27, 1901 



2 P.M. 

LECTURE, .... James Warrington, Philadelphia 

"Music in the Earlier Period of American History — 1620-1820 " 

With a vocal illustration by a large Choir 

Note — Some very rare volumes of American Music Books will be placed on 
exhibition in connection with Mr. Warrington's Le<5ture. 



3.30 P.M. 

PIANO RECITAL 



Miss ELSIE STEWART HAND, Philadelphia 
Toccata and Fugue, ...... Bach-Tausig 



a The Lark, . 
b Fairy Story, 

a Gondoliera Veneziana, 
b Valse Sentimentale, 



Glinka-Balakiereff 
Raff 

Liszt 
. Lee/son 



a Berceuse, ....... Chopin 

b Reve Angelique, . . . . . Rubinstein 

c Witches' Dance, ...... McDowell 



5. Concerto in B flat minor, 



-V. Scharwenka 



> accompanin 
Knabe Pii 



by Mr. Maurits Leefson 
: used 



MAUKITS I.KKI'SON 



GOSTAV HILLE 

Leefson-Hille Conservatory of Music 

WEIGHTMAN BUILDING 

1524-26 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia 



FACULTY 



Piano— Maurits Leefson, Henry Gordon Thunder, John F. Himmelsbach, 
Frederick Linde, Win. M. Wells, Miss Elsie Stewart Hand, Miss Jessie 
Full weiler, Mrs Lillian Briggs Fitz-Maurice, Lillian Cope, and Assistants. 

Virgil Practice Clavier— Mrs. Lillian Briggs Fitz-Maurice. 

Violin nnd Viola— Gustav Hille, Julius Falk, Miss Gertrude I. Keppelman. 

Voice Culture and Diamatic Art— Robert Hurlbrink. 

Violincello—'Wni. M. Wells. 

Flute— Martin Stobbe. 

Maip— Miss Emma Schubert. 

Theory, Composition and Orchestration — Gustav Hille. 

Organ— Henry Gordon Thunder. 

Sight Singing, Score Reading and Symphony Classes — Maurits Leefson. 

i Orchestra and Ensemble ( 'lasses— Gustav Hille. 

Orchestra, Harmony, Ensemble, Symphony and Score Reading Classes free 
to students of the Conservatory. 

CATALOGUES UPON APPLICATION TO THE SECRETARY. 



PIANOS 

Arthur Wittich 

116 South Sixth Street 

SOLE AGENT FOR THE CELEBRATED 

STONWAY and HARDMAN PIANOS 

The two leading Pianos before the American public to-day. These 
Pianos are highly endorsed by leading artists and manufacturers, 
and are sold only by the finest trade throughout the United States. 



I handle also the LINDEMAN & SON, BEHR BROS., PACKARD and 

other standard Pianos of national reputation. 

Large standing contracts enable me to offer you splendid inducements. 



A CALL WILL BE HIGHLY APPRECIATED 



..PROGRAM.. 

Academy of Music 

Friday, December 27, 1901 



Piano, 

Violin, 
Soprano, . 
Contralto, . 
Tenor, 
Baritone, 

Accompanists, 



8 P.M. 

MISCELLANEOUS CONCERT 

. Mr. Maurits Leefson, 

Mr. Carl Doell, . 
. Miss Jennie Foell, 

Miss Helen M. Tupper, . 
. Mr. Harry B. Gurney, 

Mr. J. Herbert Harrison, 

Mr. Thomas a'Becket, 

Mr. Albert w. Borst, 

Mr. Preston Ware Orem, 

Mr. W. D. Kuehner, . 



PROGRAM 
Violin — Adagio and Finale, Concerto, 
Baritone— " It is Enough " (Elijah) 
Soprano — Recitative and Aria (Der Freischiitz), 

{a Melodie, 
b Die Loreley, 
c Prelude, 
Contralto — "Storm and Sunshine," 
Tenor— "Lend me your Aid," . 
Violin — Intra, Thema, and Variations , 
Baritone— "Israfel," .... 

{a "I cannot help Loving Thee," 
b "Persian Serenade," 
c "Can I Forget?" 
Pianoforte— Ballade, .... 

„ (a " Orpheus with his Lute," 

Tenor, 1 * 

I b " Because of Thee, " 

Contralto—' ' What the Chimney Sang, " . 

The Knabe Piano used 



13 



Philadelphia 
Philadelphia 
Philadelphia 
. Sayre, Pa. 
Philadelphia 
Philadelphia 
Philadelphia 
Philadelphia 
Philadelphia 
Wilkes-Barre 



Max Brack 

Mendelssohn 

Von Weber 

. Paderewski 

Liszt 

. McDowell 

D. Buck 

Gounod 

Paganini 

. Oliver King 

Clayton John 

Garrett Colyn 

Frank Thuma 

Reinecke 

A. Sullivan 

B. Tours 

Giisuvld 



i 



HIGH OPINIONS REGARDING THE 

PIANOFORTES 




"In my opinion, they rank -with 
the best pianos made." 

WM. MASON 

" I believe your pianos to be of 
the very first rank." 

ARTHUR NIKISCH 



^ 



Dr. Wm. Mason 



Arthur Nikisch 




Harold Bauer 



"In my opinion, ho finer instrument exists than the Mason & Hamlin 
>f to-day." — HAROLD BAUER 



"It is, I believe, an instrument 
of the very first rank." 

MORITZ MOSZKOWSKI 




far as I 



"It is unsurpassed, 
knovj." 

EMIL PAUR 



Moritz Moszkowski 




Emil Paur 



O. H. UNGER & SON, Sole Agents, JJ5 N. 6th St. 

READING, PA. 



..PROGRAM.. 

Academy Hall 

Saturday, December 28, 1901 



9.30 A.M. 

Unfinished Business and Election of Officers 

Financial Report of the Treasurer, Mr. Edmund Woesieffer 

Introduction of the new President 

Closing Business 



HAZELTON 




PIANOFORTES 

CANNOT BE EXCELLED 

For Tone, Touch, Singing Quality, Delicacy 

and Great Power of Tone, with 

Highest Excellence of Workmanship. 

Hazelton Bros., New York 



EDW. A. BERG, Sole Agent, 109 S. 3d St. 

READING, PA. 




Durability 

Perfect Construction 

Effective Operation 



The Reading 
Stove WorRs 

ORR, PAINTER 6 CO. 
Reading. Penna. 



TROPIC SUNSHINE 



MANUSCRIPT 
MUSIC SOCIETY 

ELEVENTH SEASON 



SECOND 

PUBLIC 
CONCERT 

TO BE HELD AT 

GRIFFITH HALL 

1420 CHESTNUT STREET 



TUESDAY EVENING 
JANUARY TWENTY-EIGHTH 

AT EIGHT FIFT EEN 



:: 



f 3 ? 



PROGRAM 



Quintette for Piano and Strings (Op. 5) Camitte W. Zeckwer 



Allegro vivace 

Allegretto un poco andante 

Finale — allegro energico 

Piano, CAMILLE W. ZECKWER 
ist Violin, FREDERICK E. HAHN 
2d Violin, HEDDA van den BEEMT 
Viola, HOWARD RATTAY 
•Cello, D. H. EZERMANN 



2 Songs for Tenor 



Bruno Oscar Klein 



a " Zigeunerkind's Geheimniss" (The Gypsy's Secret) 

b "Unter bliihenden Baumen" (Under Blossoming- Trees) 

c "Zwei Rosen" (Two Roses) 

NICHOLAS DOUTY 



3 Sonata for Violin and Piano 



(Dedicated to Miss Elise Fay of Boston) 

Moderate 

Scherzo 

Andante 

Finale — presto 

Violin, HENRY EICHHEIM 

Piano, ELLIS CLARK HAMMANN 



Henry Etchbeim 



4 Songs for Soprano 



W. W. Gilchrist 



a "Da hist wie erne Blume" 
b "A Descant" 

MRS. MARIE KUNKEL-ZIMMERMAN 



Violincello Solo .... Bruno Oscar Klein 

Suite in F for 'cello and orchestra 
(The orchestral part played on the piano by the composer) 

Larghetto 

Menuetto, poco appassionata 

Intermezzo 

Finale — allegro vivace 

MR. LEO SCHULZ 



Novellette for String Quartette and Horn 

Frank G. Cauffman 
Adagio sostenuto 
Allegro moderate 



Horn, ROBERT MINSEL 
ist Violin, FREDERICK E. HAHN 
2d Violin, HEDDA van den Beemt 
Viola, HOWARD RATTAY 
'Cello, D. H. EZERMANN 



(T f 



IS 

3 ? 



Concert ? ? 5 

given bs tbc 

Hlumni Hssociatfon 

of tbc 

JP>foUaJ>elpbta flQusfcal Bca&ems 

1617 Spruce Street 

SaturCae, ffebtuatg 8tb, s.15 p. in. 



PIANO SOLO— Paganini Etude 
Spinning Song 

Miss Ottilie Pahl 

VOCAL SOLO— Cavatina, from the Hugenots 
Miss Luella Lake; 



/ VIOLONCELLO SOLO— a Berceuse 



1h WTJ VOCAL SOLO- 






Liszt 
Liszt 



Codard 
Gotterman 



MR. EgTON GA9TEL 



The Cloth of Gold 

Mr. H. Wallace Webb 



PIANO SOLO— Polonaise, op. 53 . 

Miss Ottiue Pahl 

VOCAL SOLO— a My Song would Fly 
b Thy Beaming Eyes 

VOCAL SOLO-The Two Grenadiers . ' Sc 

Mr. H. WALLACE Webb 

PIANO QUARTETTE— Kaiser March 

Misses Houseman, Pahl, Mills, Stafford 



Hahn 

McDowell 



Or-rtf 



■i X 



fy< 



V 



542 nd Concert 



.EN BY PUPILS OF THE 



Philadelphia 7V\uisical /^cademy 

Thursday Evening, February 20th, at 8 o'clock 
at their Hall, 1617 Spruce St. 





PROGRAMME 




PIANO- 


-Sonate op. 31, No. 2 

Miss F. Cohen 


Beethoven 


PIANO- 


-Fantasie Impromptu 

Miss C. Swing 


Chopin 


VOCAL 


—{a) O that we two were Maying . 


Gounod 




(*) Summer Evening 


Lassen 




Miss M. E. Williams 





PlANO-(a) Etude op. 10, No. 12 . | 

(b) Valse op. 42 . . j 

Mr. W. Golz 

PIANO— Scherzo, B flat minor 

Miss A. Beekman 

VOCAL— (a) Si mes vers avacent des aisles 
(/>) Strampelchen 

Miss B. Tufts 

PIANO— Impromptu, A flat . 

Miss R. Futhey 

PIANO— Polonaise in E major 

Mr. W. Heider 

ORGAN— Suite Gothique 

Miss K. O'Donnell 

VOCAL— Air from Jean d'Arc 

Miss M. Zeckwer 

PIANO— Sonate op. 13 ... 



Hahn 
Hildach 

Chopin 

Liszt 

Boellmann 

Bemberg 

Beethoven 



PIANO— (a) Etude op. 10, No. 3 . . Chopin 

(b) Hexentanz . . . MacDowell 

Miss E. Funk 

PIANO— Elfentanz .... Heymann 

Miss G. Ackroyd 

The Steinway Piano is from N. Stetson & Co., 1 1 1 1 Chestnut St. 



543 rd Concert 

Given hy Teachers of the 

Philadelphia Musical Academy 

Monday Evening, February 24th 
at 8 o'clock 



PROGRAMME 




DUO— Introduction and Polonaise for Piano and 
Violoncello - 


Chopin 


Messrs R. Zeckwer and R. Hennig 




VIOLIN SOLO— Ballade and Polonaise 


Vieuxtemps 


Mr. Howard Rattay 




PIANO SOLO— Sonate Eroicaop. 50. No- 2 - 
a Slow with Nobility 
b Erflike 
c Tenderly 
d Fiercely 


Macdowell 


Mr. Leland Howe 




VIOLONCELLO SOLO— a Andante ■ 
b Scherzo 


Luebeck 

Klengel 


Mr. Rudolph Hennig 




ORGAN SOLI— a Prelude 

b Toccata and Fugue 


Rachmaninof 
Bach 


Mr. Wassili Leps 





Sonate for Piano and Violin, op- 17 

a Allegro vivace 
b Andante 
c Presto 
Messrs C. W. Zeckwer and H. F. Rattay 



Admission - - 50 Cents 

The Steinway Grand is from N. Stetson & Co., mi Chestnut St. 



3 






Acoustics of Organ Pipes 

rider the auspices of the American Organ Players Club 01 

Monday Evening, March 3, at Eight o'clock 

at the Philadelphia Musical Academy 

1617 Spruce Street 

This Lecture is tree, and a special effort should be made by the 

lembers to show their appreciation of Mr. Zeckwer's kindness In 

eing present themselves and extending a cordial invitation to others 

iterested in the subject. 

I MAY PORTER, 
littee ' ' GEORGE A - A - WEST, 

LC PHILIP H. GOEPP, Chairman 
\ 1 120 Chestnut Street 



Progr; 



I* 



If 



546 th Concert 

given by pupils of the 

Philadelphia Musical Academy *£ <£ 

Monday evening:, March 24th, at 8 o'clock 
at their Hall, 16 17 Spruce St. 



PROGRAMME 

Quartette— (a) Serenade . . 1 Sckultz 

(b) Lustige Musikanten . J 
Misses F. Bisel, E. Nice, M. d'lnvilliers and E. Fricke 

Piano Solo — Murmuring Breathes Jensen 

Miss E. Applegate 

VOCAL — (a) Were my songs with wings provided Hahn 
(b) Lullaby . . . Hildach 

Miss B. Tufts 

Piano — Novelette in E major . . Schumann 

Miss R. Schmidt 



Piano— Ballade G minor 



Chopi, 



Vocal— (a) Elaine's Song . j p ggU 

(b) My True Love has my Heart J 

Miss A. d'lnvilliers 



Piano — Concerto (ist movement) 

Miss G. Ackroyd 


Tsckaikowski 




Piano — Rondo Capricioso 

Miss M. Martin 


Mendelssohn 




Violin Solo — Rhapsodie 

Mr. L. Freeman 


Hauser 




Piano — Waldesrauschen 

Miss M. Parker 


Lis -I 




Piano — Rondo Brillante 

Miss E. McNab 


Weber 




Vocal — (a) Du bist wie eine Blume 
(b) May Morning 

Miss E. Upjohn 


Schumann 
Denza 




Piano — Concerto 

Miss M. d'lnvilliers 


Mozart 




Piano — Kammenoi Ostrow 

Miss E. Husted 


Rubinstein 




Piano — (a) Valse C sharp minor 
(b) Scherzo E minor 

Miss J. Lang 


Chopin 
Mendelssohn 




Introduction et Allegro 

Mr. J. Clarke 


Godard 
mi Chestnut St. 




The Steinway Grands are from N. Stetson & Co. 



Ihc CEt)cnin0 bulletin. 




'■■■ ndi m hi, 



<oi,nd n „ ,„.._...., '■ |, ," n -' 



I • > r j .in 



. 



"•'""111. II- '. J-'.", im",','. ',"{ '' 



The attached reading notice appeared in 
"THE BULLETJN" of *^- . 




®hc 



,-„„,v.....,. rn ,. :UrFM||S ; = ^ 



Ilress. 




Hr. K. Zeokwer'i Lait Licturo. 
Mn Richard Zeckwer will give his 
sixth and last lecture on "acoustics 
next Monday evening, April 7 »t » 
o'clock, u. the l-l.il.-Klclphia Musical 
ny. 1617 Sprue- Street. No caret 
mission are iueeii«:irv us 



Concert 

Alumni Association 

Saturday, April 12th. 8 P. M. 



DUO— Rondo bnlhante - 

Misses Davis and Mohr 

VIOLIN SOLO— a Benedictus - 

b Caprice, op. 25, No. 2 
Mr. Julius Falk 

PIANO SOLO— Senate Eroica 

Slow with mobility — Fast — 
Elf like swift as possible 
Tenderly 
Fiercely very fast 

Mr. Leland Howe 



VOCAL— a Lullaby ) 


Chaminade 


Miss Marie Zeckwkr 




VIOLIN SOLO— Scene de la Scarda 


Jeno Hubay 


Mr. Julius Falk 




PIANO SOLO— Nocturne, B maj., op. 62 


Chopin 


Tarantella Venizia a Napoli 


Liszt 


Mr. Leland Howe 




QUARTETTE— Slavish Dances 


Dvorak 


Misses Davis, Corbin, Mohr, 


■iUTOR 



545*. h Concert 

given bg the PUPILS of the 

Philadelphia Musical Academy 

Saturday Evening, April iqth, at 5 o'clock 

at their Hall, No. 1617 Spruce Street 



Programme 



PIANO DUO— Dance Macabre - . Saint Saens 

Misses R. Thomas and F. Levy 
VOCAL— The Bird and the Rose 

Miss Anna d'Invilliers 
PIANO— Papillons 

Miss Anna Bates 
VOCAL— a Nachtstuck - 
b Zigeunerlied - 

Miss B. Tofts 
PIANO— a Des Abends - 
b Ballade, a flat 

Miss C. Wilkins 
PIANO— Gavotte 

Miss Rebecca Wellenbach 
VOCAL— Slumber Song - 

Miss Florence Hinckle 
PIANO— Polonaise, e major 

Mr. Wm. Heider 
CHORAL CLASS— Echoes from Moravia, op. 32 

a-The Fugitive. <5-The Birdling. t-The Parting. 
PIANO— Chromatic Valse - . Godard 

Miss M. Steerman 
VOCAL DUETS— Three Tuscan Folk Songs Caracciolo 

Miss M. Zeckwer and Miss M. Williams 

PIANO— Rondo Capriccioso, op. 22 - - Mendelssohn 

Orchestra accompaniment for a second Piano 

Miss E. Bowman 

VOCAL— The Little Mermaid - C. W. Zeckwer 

For alto solo 

Three part female chorus and four hand accompaniment 

Miss L. Lake and Choral Class 

Miss G. Ackroyd and Miss E. Funk 

PIANO-Intermezzo - . . Rich _ Strauss 

Miss B. Oestheimer 

PIANO QUARTETTE— Two Spanish Dances Jl/osziowsit 

Misses L. Burks, E. McNab, J. Lang, R. Schmidt 



C. W. Zeckwer 
Grieg 



Reinecke 

Ten Brink 

Franz 

Liszt 

Dvorak 



Tbe Grand Pianos are from N. Stetson S Co I Chestnut St. 



54 9 1 * 1 Concert 

Given by 

THE TEACHERS 

of the 

Philadelphia Musical Academy 

Saturday Evening, MaJ yd ^ g ^ 

At their Hall 
No. 1617 Spruce Street 

PROGRAMME 

Messrs. W.Leps.H.Rattay and R.Henni. 

Mr. Carl Samans 
Vxo LIN So LI - Pre]ude and MeaueUo froffl su;te 
Mr. H. Rattay 

Voci, -\ G r s '>V ■ ■ «*- 

\Miss Marie Stinger 
Vroi.oNCEi.i.o-Concerto 

Mr. R. Hennig- 
Piano Duo-Walzer op 72 r . 

Admission. Fifty Cents 

TheS — — rom , StelM&CMmches(M(si 



Goltermann 






! £ 



't/i'+nU 



jfT^^k 



frtwictt'* M,if»'A*>ft 



{ Abstracts of Proceedings. ) 

Physical Section.— SfeW Meeting, held Wednesday, April 23d. Dr 
Stradling in the chair. 

The first paper of the evening was read by Mr. J. Frank Meyer, of the 
Lower Merion High School, Ardmore, Pa., on "Recent Work in Electric 
Convection." The reading of the paper was followed by some appropriate 
remarks by Dr. Stradling. 

The second paper was read by Prof. Richard Zeckwer, on "An Investiga- 
tion of Piano Touch." The paper was discussed by Dr. Stradling, Mr. Meyer, 
Dr. Partridge and Dr. Goldsmith. A number of interesting lantern slides 
were shown in connection with the paper. 

The committee appointed at the last meeting to bring before the various 
scientific, technical and manufacturing bodies the action of the Institute on 
the metric system, reported that no action had as yet taken place, owing to 
the change in the constitution of the Institute, which was contemplated at 
the time the committee was appointed. 

The meeting then adjourned. 

JESSE Pawling, Jr., Secretary. 



rrt 
■i it- 



55 ist Concert 

Given by 

The Pupils of the Intermediate Department 

of the 

Philadelphia Musical Academy 

Wednesday Evening, May 7th, at 8 o'clock 
At their Hall, No. 1617 Spruce St. 



PROGRAMME 

DUET— Over Hill and Dale 

Misses E. McGann and J. Neff 
Solo — Valse Impromptu 

Mr. Walter Leupold 

DnET— Merry Sunshine Polka 

Misses V, Benner and M. Boice 

Solo— First Valse 

Miss I,. Christeson 
DUET— Will o' the Wisp 



Engehnann 

Rathburn 

Wolfhardt 

Durand 

Jungmann 



Master S. Hurlburt and Miss H. Kerr 
Solo— Camp of Gipsies 

Master M. Wolf 
Duet— Through Hill and Forrest 

Misses A. Lapetina and A. Pennvpacker 
Trio — Der Freischuetz 

Misses M. Miller, S. Downing and M. Blackwood 
DUET— Serenade . . . Mozart 

Misses E. Alexander and K. Preston 

Trio— Polonaise . . . Dietrich 

Misses M. Campbell, A. Croke and N. Eltonhead 



Vogel 
Krug 



Solo— Hungarian Dance 

Miss L. Albert 


Englemann 


Duet— Negro Dance 

Misses A. Kruger and M. McGarity 


Gurlitt 


Solo — Dance on the Lawn 


Kullak 


Miss M. Williams 




Duo— Minuet 

Misses K. Mills and F. Barrett 


Mozart 


Solo— Quietude 

Miss H. Johnson 


Gregh 


DUET— Military Polonaise 

Misses E. Mustin and K. Miller 


Webb 


Duo— Songs Without Words 

Misses F. Jocher and E. Fulmor 


Mendelssohn 


Solo — Heatherrose 


Lange 


Miss N. Bradley 


Fairy Tale— Good Night 

Miss E. Borden 


Schotte 


Tarantelle 

Miss M. Boice 


Giese 


Solo— Majurka 

Miss E. Heritage 


Jadassohn 


Solo— On the Meadow 

Miss V. Benner 


Lichner 


Solo— Tarantelle 

Miss A. Kruger 


Pieczonka 


DUET— Secret Wishes . 


Hitler 


Misses J. Wolfson and R. Moskovitz 





552"- Concert 



©uplls of tbc UntcrmeOlate ©epattment 



Ipbilabelpbia Musical Hcabem^ 

at fflriffitb Mall, H20 Chestnut St. 

SaturSas Bttcmoon, Ulay; lotb, = • at 2.30 o'clocS 



programme 




Trio— Tanzstuck 

Misses M. Erskine, M. Harris and K. Ki 


Wolf 


Soto— Cymbals and Castinets 

Miss M. Nathanson 


Schmoll 


Solo— The Old Fiddler 

Miss C. Phillips 


Engelmann 


Solo— Quiet Pleasure 

Miss Thora Zinn 


Lange 


Dcet— Liebeslied 


Henselt 



Master C. O'Donnell and R. Korb 
Soto — Wiegenlied 

Miss I. Cottringham 



Trio— Christmas Tree Waltz 

Misses K. Starke)-, L. Gseller, B. Reiser 


Muller 


Violin Solo — Sixth Air with variations 

Misses D. Simons and F. Crawford 


Dankla 


Soto— Robin's Lullaby 

Miss I. Zeckwer 


Krogmann 


DUET— Russian Folk Song 

Miss M. Lawrence and Master S. Sterritt 


Spindler 


Sou— a Tarantelle 

6 Will o' the Wisp 

Miss R. Longenecker 


Heller 
Jungmann 


Solo— Pixie's Drill 

Master C. Lavin 
Solo — Rural Festival 

Miss M. Erskine 


Broivn 
Bachmann 


Soli— a Dream from One Thousand One Nights 
b Hungarian Dance 

Miss L. Bonney 


Rtinccke 
£ngelmatm 



55 Ist Concert 

Given by 

The Pupils of the Intermediate Department 

of the 

Philadelphia Musical Academy 

Wednesday Evening, May 7th, at 8 o'clock 
At their Hall, No, 1617 Spruce St. 



PROGRAMME 



DUET— Over Hill and Dale 

Mi: 



Solo — Valse Impromptu 



s E. McGann and J. Neff 

Mr. Walter Leupold 
DOET— Merry Sunshine Polka 

Misses V. Benner and M. Boice 
Soto— First Valse 

Miss I,. Christeson 
DUET— Will o' the Wisp 

Master S. Hurlburt and Miss H, Kerr 



Solo — Camp of Gips 



Master M. Wolf 



DuET-Through Hill and Forrest 

Misses A. L-apetina and A. Pennypacker 
Trio— Der Freischuetz 

Misses M. Miller, S. Downing and M. 
DUET— Serenade 

Misses E. Alexander and K. Preston 
Trio — Polonaise 

Misses M, Campbell, A. Croke and N. Eltonhead 



Solo— Hungarian Dance 



DUET— Negro Dan 



Miss D. Albert 
i A. Kruger and M. McGarity 



Solo — Dance on the Lawn 

Miss M. Williams 
Duo— Mi 



Misses K. Mills and F. Barrett 



Solo— Quietude 



Duet— Military Polonaise 



Miss H. Johns 



Mi 



; E. Mustin and K. Miller 



Duo 

Solo — Heatherrose 
Fairy Tale— Good Night 
Tarantelle 
Solo— Majurka 
Solo— On the Meado 
Solo— Tarantelle 



Without Words 

Misses F. Jocher and E. Fulrj 



Miss N. Bradley 
Miss E. Borden 
Miss M. Boice 
Miss E. Heritage 
Miss V. Benner 
Miss A. Kruger 



Duet— Secret Wishes 

Misses J. Wolfson and R. Mosk'ovitz 



Engelmann 

Rathburn 

Wolfhardt 

Durand 

Jungmann 

Bekr 

Vogel 

Mozart 

Dietrich 

Englemann 

Gurlitt 

Kullak 

Mozart 

Gregh 

Webb 

Mendelssohn 

Schotte 

Giese 

Jadassohn 

Lichner 

Pieczonka 

/filler 



r.l 



il 



S I 



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T f 



S. K. 
K t 
« P 



3 J 
11 



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S. g 



2 g SI 



I » 

g u o 

I 9 'ST 






1 Cn 



55 - * a ^ 



« 123 

so 
or 

o 



/7 



m 



554^ Concert 

Civen by 

The GRADUATES 



Philadelphia Musical Academy 

At their Hall, 1617 Spruce St. 
Wednesday Evening, May 21st, at 8 o'clock 



PROGRAMME 

Organ Solo— a Suite (two movements) Boellman 

b Fugue (the great g minor) Bach 

Miss Katherine O'Donnell 

Piano — Concerto in d minor . Mendelssohn 

Orchestra arranged for second Piano 

Miss Jessie Catanach 

Vocal — Like as the heart desireth the water brook 

Allitsen 
With Organ Accompaniment 

Miss Luella Lake 

Piano — Capriccio op. 22 . . Mendelssohn 

Miss Caroline H. Quintin 

Organ — a Prelude . . . Dethier 

b Etude . . . Thomas 

Miss Katherine O'Donnell 

Piano — Carneval . . . Schumann 

Mr. Walter A. Golz 

VOCAL — a At Sea . . . Schubert 

b Hedgerose . . . Schubert 

Miss Luella Lake 

Organ Solo — Fugue . . Rheinbergcr 

Miss Katherine O'Donnell 



I 



555™ Concert 



GRADUATES 



Philadelphia Musical Academ; 



AT MUSICAL FUND HALL 
Eighth and Locust Streets 



Saturday Evening, May 24th 

at Eieht o'clock 



SX 6 





Concert 




GIVEN BY THE PUPILS OF THE 




Germantown Branch 




OF THE 




Philadelphia Musical Academy 




(MAIN AND FINISHING DEPARTMENTS) 




Wednesday, May 28, 1902 




Eight o'clock Association Hall 




Main and Rittenhouse Streets 




GERMANTOWN 



PROGRAMME 

Overture— Preciosa . . ■ Weber 

PUPILS' ORCHESTRA 

Under the direction of PROF. CARL Samans 

Piano Solo— Invitation to the Dance . . Weber-Tausig 

Miss Grace D. Ackroyd 

Concerto g major (Cadenza by d'Albert) . Beethoven 

Miss Anna E. Beekman and Orchestra 

Piano Solo — Ernani Fantasie . . Liszt 

Miss Rebecca L. Thomas 

Vocal— "Aria from the Prophet" . . Meyerbeer 

Miss Luella Lake 

Concertstuck — (Two last movements) . . Weber 

Mr. Walter A. Golz and Orchestra 



Concerto e 



. op. II, ist movement . Chopin 

Miss Martha C. Parker 



Introduction and Allegro . . Godard 

Miss Ethel M. Funk and Orchestra 

Concerto e flat . Liszl 

Mr. William Heider 

Piano Solo— Bolero . . . Chopin 

The Receiver of the Gold Medal 

Distribution of Diplomas, Teachers' Certificates and Gold Medals 

Orchestra— Egyptian Dance .• . Bizet 



Steinwav Grands are from N. Stetson & Co., (Ill Chestnut Street 



pupils' ©rcbestra 



1st Wiolfns 

Miss A. Baker 

Miss Alice Greims 

Mr. O. Wittich 

Mr. W. Abendroth 
2110 IDfOlinS Mr. M. Kirk 

Miss M. Zeckwer 

M. Penny packer 

M. Opdyke 

D. Simmons 

Mast. D. Bove 

ItHolas Dfoloncelll 

Mr. Emil Schmidt (Teacher) Miss A. Bundy 

Mr. L. Freeman Mr. W. Schmidt 

Mr. A. Hassle r 

Bouble 3Bass 

Mr. J. Fasshauer (Teacher) 
" G. Merrill 

jf lutes ©boes 

Miss M. Steerman Miss G. Daily 



English 1bom Clarinets JBassoons 

Miss F. Rogerson Miss G. Ackroyd Miss E. McNab 

t>orne Crumpets 

Miss J. Gorman Miss L,. Berry 

trombones 

Miss J. Catanach 

TOmpanf ©reat Brum 

Mr. C. Bawden Mr. E. Crouthers 



Small Brum Crlangle Cambourin 

Mr. J. Clark Miss H. Carpenter Miss O. Pahl 



PROGRAM 



: Nocturne 
Second Valse 
is Mary Homiller 



VOCAL 




a At Sea 1 
h Hedge Rose J 
Miss Luella Lake 




Schubert 


DUO 




Sonate 




Mozart 




Misses Florence Bisel and Elsie Nice 




PIANO 




a Venetian Love Song 
b Rustle of Spring 
Miss Helen Carpenter 




Striding 


VIOLIN 




a Cavatine 
b Rondo 
Mr. Maurice Kirk 




Raff- 
Rode 


SYMPHONY CLASS 
Misses E. 


o Serenade l 
b Country Musicians / 
Nice, P. Bisel, E. Pricke, M. d' Invilliers 


Schidtz 


PIANO 




a Idyll 

b Valse Chromatique 
Miss Emilie Fricke 




Qodard 


VOCAL 




Aria from opera " 11 re pastore " 

Miss Ethel Upjohn 

(Violin obligate, Mr. Kibk) 




Mozart 


PIANO 




a En Automne 

b Liebes walzer 

Miss Florence Caveny 




Chaminade 
Moszkowski 


PIANO 




Introduzione et Allegro 
Mr. Joseph Clark 




Godard 


SYMPHONY CLASS 
Misses C 


Galop de Concert 
Iaveny, Shaw, Carpenter and Mr. 


Clark 


Milde 



STEINWAY PIANOS USED 



'THE GERMANTOWN BRANCH of the well-known Philadel- 
* phia Musical Academy was opened fifteen years ago by Mr. 
Richard Zeckwer. It is the only Conservatory in Cermantown, and 
offers advantages to its students that they could not possibly obtain 
by private teaching. The curriculum includes all branches of music, 
and the teachers are all well known artists in their profession. 

The class system taught in this Academy is adopted, not be- 
cause it is the cheapest, but because it Is the best manner of en- 
couraging interest and ambition in the student. Many other 
advantages are also offered through the many lessons given them 
gratuitously, such as Theory, Symphony and Ensemble Classes, etc. 

The school is now under the direction of Mr. Camllle W. 
Zeckwer, who is desirous to sustain and increase its reputation. 

There are accommodations for 500 students. The classes re- 
open September the eighth, 1902. 

For circulars apply to 



CnniLLE V. Zeckwer 

PROPRIETOR 4£!B DIRECTOR 
60Z9 /"IAIN STREET, QERMArlTOWN 



QQl .a 



560 th Concert 

Civen by Pupils of the 

Philadelphia Musical A ca( ^ em y 

At their Hall, 1617 Spruce Street 
Tuesdjy Evening, Dec. 2d 



Programme 



Piano Sot.o Scherzo C sharp minor Chopin 

Mr. Clarence Bawden 

Vocal 
a The Robin Sings in the Appletree -\ 

b The West Wind Croons in the Cedar Tree [• MacDowell 
c Through the Meadow ) 





Miss Marie Zeckwer 






Organ 


Prelude and Fugue in 
Mr. Reuben Reeves 


F 


Bach 


Piano Solo 


Gavotte 
Miss Caroline Kaufman 


Bach Saint Saeus 


Vocal 


Persian Song 
Miss Maude McFarland 




Chadwick 


Piano 


Magic Fire Scene 

Miss Alice Weir 


B 


•assin Wagner 


Piano 


Impromptu op. 142 No. 
Miss Carolyn Fretz 


3 


Schubert 


Violoncello The Dream 

Mr. Hermann Henuing 




Golterman 


Piano 


Fantasie Impromptu 
Miss Lena Burke 




Chopin 


Piano 


Prelude and Fugue C mi 
Miss Jean Calhoun 




Bach 


Vocal 


Traume 
Mrs. F. Klauder 




Wagner 


Piano 


Polka de la Reine 
Mr. Joseph Clark 




Raff 



Piano Quartet Overture : Rosamunde Schubert 
Misses Minna Steerman, Anna Bates, Luella Smith, Helen Young 



561 st Concert 

Given by the Teachers of the 

Philadelphia Musical Academy 

Saturday Evening, Dec. 6th, at 8.15 
At Griffith Hall, 1420 Chestnut St. 

Programme 

Quartet for Piano, Violin, Viola and Cello, (first time) 

C. IV. Zeckwer 

a Allegro maestoso b Andante c Moderato assai 

Messrs. Camille Zeckwer, Elkan Kosman, Howard Rattay 

and Rudolph Hennig 

Piano Soli— a Variations Serieuses Mendelssohn 

b Aubade Schytte 

Mr. Rich. Zeckwer 

Sonate for Piano and Violin, op. 13, g major Rubinstein 
a Moderato b Adagio and Finale 
Messrs. Carl Samans and Howard Rattay 



Vocal — a An die Leyer 
b Das Ringlein 

Miss Marie Buedinger 

Violoncello Soli— a Adagio 

b At the Fountain 
Mr. Rudolph Hennig 

Violin Soli— a Romanze 

b Perpetuum Mobile 
Mr. Elkan Kosman 

Concert Pathetiqoe for two pianos 

Messrs. Wassili I^eps and Leland He 



Schubert 
Chopin 



Van Goens 
Davidoff 



Kes 
Ries 



Liszt 



The Steinway Grands are from N. Stetson & Co., in 1 Chestnut ! 



MUSICAL ACADEMY 

GIVES A CONCERT 



.' tli Hall. The 
.' hv Camille 



. :;■■■■■■ 



rinir: Henderson. M 



•(ftosman (Quartet 
Concerts 

gecon& Concert 

■Caeoneaoau Evening, December I7tb, 1902 

at 8. is 



(5riffitb Ifcall 



i flbestnut Street 



artists 
MR. ELKAN KOSMAN, First Violin 

MR. EDWIN BRILL, Second Violin 

MR. HOWARD RATTAY, Viola 

MR. Rudolph hennig, 'Cello 

MISS SUSANNA DERCUM, Vocalist 
MR. HENRY GRUHLER, Accompanist 

Tickets. $i. 5 o 
On Sale at Heppe's, 1115 Chestnut Street 



■I'M . ■HT..A-K 






' w 1 ;k 



561 st Concert 

Given by the Teachers of the 

Philadelphia ]\/fusical A ca( * em y 

Saturday Evening, Dec. 6th, at 8.15 
At Griffith Hall, 1420 Chestnut St. 

Programme 

Quartet for Piano, Violin, Viola and Cello, (first time) 

C. IV. Zcckzi'et 

a Allegro maestoso b Andante c Moderato assai 

Messrs. Camille Zeckwer, Elkan Kosmain, Howard Rattay 

and Rudolph Hennig 

Piano Soli— a Variations Serieuses Mendelssohn 

b Aubade Schytte 

Mr. Rich. Zeckwer 

Son ate for Piano and Violin, op. 13, g major Rubinstein 
a Moderato b Adagio and Finale 
Messrs. Carl Samans and Howard Rattay 

Vocal— a An die Leyer 
b Das Ringlein 

Miss Marie Buedinger 

Violoncello Soli— a Adagio 

b At the Fountain 
Mr. Rudolph Heunig 

Violin Soli— a Romanze 

b Perpetuum Mobile 
Mr. Elkan Kosman 

Concert Pathetique for two pianos 

Messrs. Wassili Leps aud Iceland Howe 



Schubert 



Van Goens 
Davidojf 



Kes 
Ries 



The Steinway Grands are from N, Stetson & Co., mi Chestnut St. 



MUSICAL ACADEMY 

GIVES A CONCERT 



Griffith Hall. The 
cert was the perfor 



!.■;.] A.u.l 



Iftosman (Quartet 
Concerts 

Second Concert 

TOleoneBBag Evening, ©ecembec I7tb, 1902 

mt 8.15 

(Sriffitb Ifoal 

1420 Cbcstnut Street 
1 a ■ 

artists 
MR. ELKAN KOSMAN, First Violin 

MR. EDWIN BRILL, Second V 

MR. HOWARD RAT 

MR. RUDOI 



Tickets, $1.50 
On Sale at Heppe's, 1115 Chesl 



Twelfth Season 

Manuscript Music Society 

of Philadelphia 



SECOND 
PRIVATE 
CONCERT 

to be held at 

THE ORPHEUS ROOMS 



Monday Evening 
December Twenty-second 

at Eight-fifteen 



^ Program ^ 



1 Sonata (unfinished) — for Piano 



A. Mailed Zellner 



a Allegro con brio 

b Tema con Variazione 

c Scherzando — Allegretto con anima 



MR. PHILIP H. GOEPP 



2 Songs 



A. Mailert Zellner 



3 Flute Solo — "Sonata 



Flute-SIGNOR CLEMENTE BARONA 
Piano— SIGNOR GIORGIO MINOLITI 



4 Sonata— for Violin and Piano 



Violin— MR. HOWARD RATTAY 
Piano— MISS ELSA MOHR 



Giorgio MinolUi 



Elsa Mohr 



5 Songs 



W. W. Gilchrist 



a "Poor Love" 
b " Song of Life " 



6 Quartette, Op. 9— for Piano, Violin, Viola 

and Violoncello . Camille W. Zechwer 



a Allegro maestoso 

b Andante 

c Moderato 

Piano— MR. C. W..ZECKWER 
Violin— MR. E. KOSMAN 
Viola— MR. H. RATTAY 
Violoncello— MR. R. HENNIG 



programme 

STRING QUARTET— G Major . 

I. Allegro— Vivace Assai 

II. Menuetto Allegro 

III. Andante Cantabile 

IV. Molto Allegro • 

SONGS— (a) " Tod und das Madchen " . 
(£) " Fru'hlingsnacht " 

Miss Susanna Dercum 

VIOLIN SOLO— Adagio from Ninth Concerto 

MP. F:I.KAN KOSMAN 

SONGS— (a) " Der Asia " ... 

{6) " Morgenthau'' 



list of Patrons ano patronesses 



Schubert 
Schumann 



Spohr 



Rubinstein 
Grieg 



Miss Susanna Dercum 

STRING QUARTET— Op. 12, E Flat . . Mer 

I. Adagio non Troppo, Allegro non Tardante 

II. Canzonetta 

III. Andante Expressivo 

IV. Molto Allegro e Vivace 

STEINWAY GRAND PIANO 



Mrs. Charles F. Albert 

Mrs. Woodward Arnett 

Miss adele Auze 

Mrs. Frederick L. Baily 

Mrs. E. F. Beale 

Miss Helene Boericke 

Mrs. John f. Braun 

Miss Anna Lina Bright 

Miss K. F. Brovvnell 

Mrs. Edward D. Burleigh 

Mrs. Geo. Burnham, Jr. 

Mr. Doane Cafferton, Jr. 

Mrs. A. Knickerbocker Davis 

Mrs. John H. Easby 

Mrs. Spencer Ervin 

Mrs. S. B. Fleisher 

Mrs. George Gebbie 

Miss M. C. Griffith 

Mrs. E. A. Hancock 

Mrs. Alfred C. Harrison 

Miss Harriet A. Etienne Henry 

Mrs. Owen B. Jenkins 

Mrs. Thos. A. Kelly 

Miss Gertrude Keppelman 

Mrs. Arthur Kitsqn 

Mrs. J. George Klemm 



Mrs. M. Livingston 

Mr. A. B. Loeb 

Mrs. Edward Loeb 

Mrs. H. K. Lorimer 

Mrs. Fred. B. Lott 

Mrs. J. A. Loucheim 

Miss Madeira 

Mr. Foster marsh 

Mrs. Thomas McKean, Jr. 

Mrs. M. Hawlby McLanahan 

Miss Ethel Parrish 

Mrs. Edward Moore Robinson 

Miss Else' West Rui.on 

Mrs. C. Morton Smith 

Miss Anne Thomson 

Mrs. Alexander Van Rensselaer 

Miss Frances C. Waynb 

Mrs. S. Burns Weston 

Mr. Andrew Wheeler, Jr. 

Mrs. Charles S. Whelbn 

Miss Frances A. Wister 

Mrs. Edwin Wolf 

Mrs. Louis Wolf 

Mrs. Georgb Wood 

Mrs. Camille W. Zeckwer 

Mrs. Richard Zeckwer 



cAi--. #..„,. Mv-Hoi 



f 



EDITORIAL BRIC-A-BRAC. m 

*e action of mtuitive ^ ^ ^ ~t,y decided by 
» 'he legato touch upon the pbn' " ' I I ° T '^"^ 
fished friend, Mr. Virgi, de cl res i ' ^ ^ diStin " 
duced except upon one of h s instruments fT' -^ P ^ 
sic, or at least w„ . j "iscruments for mmirniz ng- mu- 

m his instrument. Many evcll, T tW ° clicks " 

from his contentions ever sin t fi T^ "^ dis ™ 

chanced to think of the expedient f T de . tten . b « nobody 

question. This has beenTeft for th^" 6 "^" 7 '"'^ the 

careful piano teacher Mr Rij° rr / T ^ "*" and 

with the result of d monstratt ♦, ^ ° f Phi, ^elphia, 

I >-ave plaved legato bv th rl of ?' ™f ia »-P-ists who 

1 have been much nearer he .^^^ the mus ^ sense 

ventor. Mr. Zeckwer be.™ II g a " OUr as sertive i n - 

, Paying a true legato upon tL ^ '° diSC ° Ver wh «her in 

each other half 4v un overh "T ^ ** ^ P aSSed 

-the three degrees implying Z £ 1 "f*** ^ 

'» « .-en instance the Tones ' e l^T^ "^ *" 
a"d not overlapped or i„ the 7Z I f* egat ° 3S cIaim ed 
Zeckwer began bv *Z^S»£*$?. S ™ d - Mr. 
e'ectnc circuit (by means of a HWe Zl ^ m "° W ' th a " 
a " d a spring) in such a * » ™ e , brass Plate under the key 
™ electric circuit, which n U'a t^T'* *' ^ d ° Sed 
a «d brought clown a stylu """ ^ ^ a " e,ectr °-magnet 
kymograph-an instru S I™ ^ ""^ Paper of *e 
» a '"e would imply. When,, SS COm P lica ted than its 

P^er were examLd w fo^'T *.*» s ^ "P°n the 
depression of the new key took "f !° S trUe Ie * at ° '»e 

'erval before the elevation of *' u^ a P"«Ptible m'- 
a >nountedtobri„g injrthe " e ° ,' e ° Id <**■ Whether this 

°" e "Wed up, or half way d^"^ "7", ^ the ° ,d 
• "■ Zeckwer does not 



♦ffrosman Quartet 
(Toncerts 

(first Season) 

Gbiro Concert 
Me&nesDav Evening, Januarv 2lst, 1903 



(Jrtffitb Iftall 

1420 (Ibeatnut Street 



artiste 
MR. ELKAN KOSMAN, First Violin 

MR. EDWIN BRILL, Second Violin 

MR. HOWARD RATTAY, Viola 

MR. RUDOLPH HENNIG, 'Cello 



MRS. CHARLES G. KLAUDER, Vocalist 
MISS N. WESTPECK, Accompanist 



£+.*<? ^ 
*<*>***_ 



Tickets, $1.50 
On Sale at Heppe's. n 15 Chestnut Street 



ftosman Quartet 
(Concerts 



Jfourtb Concert 



at 8.15 



G^ffitb f^all 



<«0 Cbestnut Street 

MR. ELKAN KOSMAN, Fir^nT^ 

MR. EDWIN BRILL, Second Violin 

MR. HOWARD RATTAY, Viola 

MR. RUDOLPH HENNIG, 'Cello 

Pianists 

MR. Henry Holden huss 
Mr. Camille Zeckwer 

Tickets, $i. so 
On Sale at Heppe's, ,„ 5 Chestnut Sfreet 



242 EDITORIAL BRIC-A-BRAC. 

seem to have inquired. At all events here is his record, which 
shows that, assuming his legato connections to have been 
all equally perfect, the keys to a slight extent overlap each 
other. The record also shows something more. It shows 
'very plainly that this overlapping was unequal, being longer 
for the weak fingers and shorter for the stronger. This dif- 
ference must have been due Jo slower muscular action in the 
case of the weaker fingers, and plainly points to a source of 
error, since his account of the experiments does not suggest 
any inequality in the legato, as between the playing of the 
thumb and second finger, second and third, etc. In his main 
contention Mr. Zeckwer y was quite right. 

When his device was applied to Mr. Virgil's instrument for 
minimizing music, and the .two "clicks" were made to coincide, 
the kymograph, having no interest in that most worthy in- 
vention, basely showed a distinct failure to connect, the in- 
terval between the cessation of one key and the beginning of 
the next being as great as the overlapping had been in the 
previous cases. 

Another very unexpected result of Mr. Zeckwer's experi- 
ments was to establish the curious fact (if fact it be) that in' 
repetitions of single fingers upon the same key the limit was 
between five and eight a second, and that persons who had had 
no previous training upon the piano had as great speed in this 
respect as those who pjayed well. I do not feel prepared to 
accept this report as final ; I would like to see it tried with 
some such fingers as those of Godowsky. I cannot believe' 
that a common laborer, as Mr. Zeckwer says, has equal rap- 
idity with single fingers with a trained pianist. 

Another curious product of this lot of experiments was Mr. 
Zeckwer's determination of the limit of speed of notes per 
second. Taking -a five-finger passage up and back as fast : as' 
possible he found 'the limit to be twenty-five a second; whereas' 
in a trill there were but sixteen, which it will be observed 
is the double of the previously ascertained limit of single 1 
fingers: Looked at from this standpoint the determination ap- 
pears reasonable enough, although from mere musical im-> 
pression a musician would have supposed a trill to have been: 
as rapid as ' the five-finger passage. ; i ■ ■ i ■ 



EDITORIAL BRIC-A-BRAC. m 

These experiments recall some that T ™a 
with Godowsky, some years ago a S to Ifi ^f. lnf <™% 
was found that in his nenw.f? SPeed ' ln which & 

chord at every bea t the' s s^T'd ^ *"** ^ 
notes per second. Th e rat i mt I ? f ™* ab ° Ut sixtee « 
ing, not because the no ar "so £? T *? ***>" heai " 
harmonies. ' S ° fast ' but V reason of the 

*£5£&g££&-*<* ** &* a good 

so far out of the vvav ,,, e o„ h "?**&»*■ the k <^ " "« 
d»". As he doe, i, >„'„ ' h? '", T * " S to how " is 
device. Bu, as Z&t u«T ° "' '' * * Ie « i,im * 
of ha„d conditio P ns f it s IXf~ £"***** 
'" S mus ™'- habits and hand eoJtl,! ' m " k! " , - 

of Mr. t^Z^Z T mLt 7 <* * «™< 
*- a„d centra, ^££ %*?£****. *• 

case was alike excellent rem, in" egat ° In each 

'-en able to add to his LZZZ" ""^T^ " he had 
^e same series, showing the nr • SeC ° nd '* ° f rCCOrds ' °f 
string came into acS^ ^ ^ ™ h &*°. 
Pletely determinative. W ° Uld the " have been com- 

tainly gi ves that ™ e f^ K . Conservatory of Music cer- 

P-turesque and S^ TTln' ^ inStruct ion a 

^velopthequalitilsneerd-nhiTn- ^^ Mn Nikisch wil1 
to show. At least his oresen P ° Sltl ° n remains for time 

Popularity of ^Z^S^T^^^ ^ C <*^ 
«eeded,i mp rovements in stan/", G ^ **■ lead to some 
Upon the latter head the? H * ^ ***** force - 

-me difficulty as all m t ic S ^f "^ Under the 
^Hy great teachers cTn att at ■* ^ dtks > that the 
ambers and at prices so favo rah **** ^^ ^^ 



EDITORIAL BRIC-A-BRAC. 



mirable figure. Such teachers as Hans von Schiller, Bern- 
hard Listemann, Theodore Spiering and the like, do not con- 
fine their teaching to a school without suitable recompense. But 
in Europe it is doubtful whether the most celebrated director 
possible to be named enjoys as large a salary as the musical 
college pays more than one of its heads of department. Ow- 
ing to this element the Leipsic conservatory has in former 
years lost one after another of its really effective teachers 
while mainly the routiners and unaggressive alone have been 
left to carry on its instruction-. 

Now in education communicating knowledge and ascertain- 
ing that the pupils have assimilated at least an official mini- 
mum of it are by no means the main elements in the progress 
of the pupils. The great thing is contact of mind with mind, 
and especially the contact with first-class minds. There is 
something stimulative and formative in this contact, wholly 
aside from the actual items of knowledge communicated. The 
addition of such an artist as Nikisch affords at least a modi- 
cum of this stimulation in Leipsic. 

It also tends to place the stress of musical education where 
it belongs, namely, upon a real knowledge of the art of music 
in its most glorious treasures. For to a musician like Arthur 
Nikisch a temperamental interpretation of a master work in 
music counts for much more than the most thorough dis- 
play of dates, creative principles and information about mu- 
sic. 

There is another point in which the advent of Nikisch will 
be extremely useful to the school, and that is in his knowl- 
edge of the pianoforte. While not distinctly a solo pianist, 
like Emil Paur, he is a very fine accompanist upon the piano 
and a modern player in all his aspirations and tendencies. 
Now it is well known that Leipsic has almost always been 
behind in this important department and no doubt the situa- 
tion will soon be clear to the new director. 

Naturally in a school- like Liepsic where so many advanced 
and talented young musicians from all over the world gather, 
there is a great deal of lovely material for making interpre- 
tative artists, if the conditions were not prohibitory. As it 
is, the school always includes a number of talented pianists, 






c 

II 



567 th Concert 

Given by the Pupils of the 

Philadelphia Musical Academy 

At their Hall. 1617 Spruce Street 
Monday Evening, March 2d, at 8 o'clock 

Programme 



Piano — Ernani Paraphrase 

Miss I,. Smith 


Verdi-Liszt 


Piano — Polacca brillante 

Miss F. Urban 


Weber 


Piano — Violet 

Miss E. Applegate 


Kullak-Mozart 


Vocal — Myrthen und Rosen 

Mrs. Chas. Klauder 


Schwnann 


Piano — a Vogel als prophet \ 
b Aufschwung J 

Miss L. Burke 


Schumann 


Violin — Ballade 

Miss G. Keppelman 


Moszkozvski 


Piano — a Solfeggietta 

b Les joyeux papillons 

Miss R. Wellenbach 


Bach 
Gregh 


Vocal — a Dear, when I Look Into Thine Eyes ) 
b The Butterfly is in Love with the Rose J 

Hadley 

Miss M. Williams 


Piano — Fantasie Impromptu 

Miss E. Husted 


Chopin 


Piano— Ballade A flat 

Miss F. Levy 


Chopin 


Violin — Romance 

Miss A. Baker 


Svendse?i 


Piano— Ballade G minor 

Miss H. Young 


Chopin 


Vocal — a My Love is an Arbutus 
b Strampelchen 

Mrs. John Wister 


Stanford 
Hildach 


Piano — a Nocturno Op. 27 No. 2 \ 

b Etude Op. 25 No. 3 ) 

Miss E. McNab 


Chopin 


Piano — March Militaire 

Miss G. Ackroyd 


Schubert-Tausig 


Vocal — a Dedication } 
b The Forest j 

Miss F. Hinkle 


Franz 


Piano — Scherzo C sharp minor 

Mr. E. Crouthers 


Chopin 


The Steinway Pianos are from N. Stetson & Co 


, mi Chestnut St. 









Concert 

Given by the 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

of the 

Philadelphia Musical Academy 

At the Hall. 1617 Spruce Street 

Saturday, Feb. 28th, 1903 

(ORIGINAL COMPOSITIONS) 



Trio — for Piano, Violin and Cello Miss B. E. Stafford 
(Two movements) 
a Moderato 
b Barcarolle 

Misses Stafford, Alice Baker, E. Oik 



Piano — a Evening ~\ 

b Summer [ Miss Florence M. Paul 

c Autumn J 

Miss Florence M. Paul 



Vocal— a The Bird and the Rose 
b Lullaby 
c Who'll buy my Love-knots 

Mr. Camille W. Zeckwt 

Miss Marie Zeckwer 



Piano — a Nocturne "I ... , . T _ , ;: 

b Valse Grazioso \ Mlss J essie L Fulwetler 

Miss Jessie L. Fulweiler 



Vocal— a Widmung | Mss Elsa Mohr 

I Two German Songs \ Herman Mohr 

Miss Mary E. Williams 

Piano — Concerto — Op. S Mr. Camille IV. Zeckwer 

(One movement) 

Mrs. Florence A. Caveny Hoyt, Mr. C. W. Zeckwer 



TWELFTH SEASON 



Manuscript Music Society 

of Philadelphia 

Fifth Private Concert 




Thursday Evening 
March Nineteenth 

at Eight-fifteen 




A 



] 



5 

r 

/ 



To be held at The Orpheus Rooms 

1520 Chestnut Street 



57' st 



Concert 



by the Pupils of the 



Philadelphia Musical Academy 

At their Hall, 1617 Spruce Street 
Wednesday Evening, April 1st, 1903, at 8 o'clock 

Programme 



PIANO— Toccatelle .... 
Miss Julia Gorman 


Dupont 


PIANO— a Fantasie Impromptu 
b Witches Dance 

Miss Mary Martin 


Chopin 
. MacDovvell 


PIANO— Nocturno Op. 27 No. 2 

Miss Jean Lang 


Chopin 


VOCAL— a Mighty Like a Rose 
b May Morning 

Miss B. Nachod 


Nevin 
Denza 


PIANO— Spinning Song 

Miss Clarinda Wilkins 


Wagner-Liszt 


PIANO— Romanze from Concerto Op. 11 

Miss Ethel Bowman 


Chopin 


PIANO— a LesSylvansl 

b Valse" j 1 ' 

Miss E. Claire John 


. Chaminade 


VOCAL— a O Ring Upon Mv Finger) 
b Come, Dearest Sisters / 

Miss Mary E. Williams 


Schumann 


PIANO— Papillons .... 
Miss Yetta Herman 


Lavalee 


PIANO— Momenta Capriccioso 

Mr. George Haebler 


Weber 


PIANO— Etincelles .... 
Miss Minna Steerman 


. Moszkowski 


VOCAL— Spring Song .... 
Miss Marie Rufe 


MacKenzie 


PIANO— Man lebt nur einmal . 

Mr. Clarence Bawden 


Strauss-Tausig 


PIANO— Air de Ballet .... 
Miss Helen Baumann 


. Moszkowski 


PIANO— Polonaise .... 


Liszt 



Miss Caroline Fretz 
The Steinway Grand is from N. Stetson & Co., mi Chestnut St. 



^ Program Ng 

i®®G®®®®®®®®®ee.®®®®®®®:®®®®®m.®®<& 



4 Songs 



a Song from the Opera "Jean and Jeanette' 

b " I Love You, Dear " 

c " Who'll Buy My Love Knots" 

MISS MARIE ZECKWER 



Camille Zechwer 



J JU~W^ / A~ 414 



Suite for Violin and Piano . . W. W. Gilchrist 

a Reverie 

b Intermezzo 

c Introduction and Perpetual Motion 

Vlolin-MR. ELKAN KOSMAN 
Piano-MR. ELLIS CLARK HAMMANN 



2 Songs 

a "Annette" 

b " Darling, I Love Thee " 



H. M. Staton 



(Words by Frank J. Palmer) 
MRS. H. M. STATON 



Quartette 

a Allegro Moderate 
b Adagio ma non Troppo 
c Allegretto Vivacissimo 
d Allegro con Spirito 



H. A. Lang 



Piano— MR, HENRY ALBERT LANG 
Violin— MR. FREDERICK E. HAHN 
Viola— MR. REINHOLD SCHEWE 
Violoncello-MR. BERTRAND A. AUSTIN 



3 Songs 



S. L. Hermann 



a Dammerung 

b Ganz im Geheimen 

c Waldblumelein 



MR. ROBERT SCHURIG 




571 st Concert 

Civen by the Pupils of the 



Philadelphia Musical Academy 

■ Hall, 1617 Sprua 
ning, April 1st, 190 

Programme 



At their Hall, 1617 Spruce Street 
Wednesday Evening, April 1st, 1903, at 8 o'clock 



PIANO— Toccatelle .... 
Miss Julia Gorman 


Dupont 


PIANO— Fantasie Impromptu 
b Witches Dance 

Miss Mary Martin 


Chopin 
. MacDowell 


PIANO— Nocturno Op. 27 No. 2 

Miss Jean Lang 


Chopin 


VOCAL— a Mighty Like a Rose 
b May Morning 

Miss B. Nachod 


Nevin 
Denza 


PIANO— Spinning Song 

Miss Clarinda Wilkins 


Wagner-Liszt 


PIANO— Romanze from Concerto Op. 11 

Miss Ethel Bowman 


Chopin 


PIANO— a LesSylvansl 
b Valse / 

Miss E. Claire John 


. Chaminade 


VOCAL— a O Ring Upon My Finger \ 
b Come, Dearest Sisters J 

Miss Mary E. Williams 


Schumann 


PIANO— Papillons .... 
Miss Yetta Herman 


Lavalee 


PIANO — Momenta Capriccioso 

Mr. George Haebler 


Weber 


PIANO— Etincelles .... 
Miss Minna Steerman 


. Moszkowski 


VOCAL— Spring Song .... 
Miss Marie Rufe 


MacKenzie 


PIANO— Man lebt nur einmal . 

Mr. Clarence Bawden 


Strauss-Tausig 


PIANO— Air de Ballet .... 
Miss Helen Baumann 


. Moszkowski 


PIANO— Polonaise .... 


Liszt 



7 



Miss Caroline Fretz 
The Steinway Grand is from N. Stetson & Co., mi Chestnut St. 



INVITATION 

to the 

Piano Recita 

given bg 

A\iss Grace Davidson Ackroyd 

assisted bg 
MISS MHRIE ADELAIDE ZECKWER, Soprano 



Saturday, April 4fh, at 5.15 o'clock 
A I 1617 Spruce Street 

PROGRAMME 

Piano— Concerto B flat minor . . Tschaikowski 

Orchestra Accompaniment arranged for Second Piano 

(Mr. Richard Zeckwer) 

Vocal— The Loreley . . . Liszt 

Piano— a Tocatta and Fugue . 

b Hark ! Hark ! the Lark 

Vocal— a With a Water Lily 
b A Swan 
c The First Primrose 

Piano— a Nocturno op. 27, No. 2, D flat 
b Impatience 
c Hexentanz 
d Prelude 

Vocal— a Speak Music 
b Nocturne 
c Good-Bye to Summer 



Bach-Tausig 
Schubert-Liszt 



Grieg 



Piano — a Fantasie op. 49 

b Elfenspiel 

c March Militaire 
The Steinway Grand is from N. Stetson & Co 



Chopin 

Camille Zeckwer 

MacDowell 

Rachmaninoj) 

Edgar 

Nevin 

C. Zeckwer 

Chopin 
Heymann 

Schuberl-Tausig 
, mi Chestnut St. 



r?i 



4-/ /^ 



rv< 



^t 





el Keppelmann 

Recital 



icholas Douty 

and 

ry A. Gruhler 

Monday Evening, April 20/03 

At 8.15 o'clock 



Griffith Hall 
1420 Chestnut St., Philadelphi 



/ 



ik 



575th Concert 

of the 

Philadelphia Musical Academy 

Given by the Pupils of the 

INTERMEDIATE DEPARTMENT 

At their Hall, 1617 Spruce Street 
Wednesday Evening, May 6th, 1903, at 8 o'clock 

Programme 



QUARTET 


March 

sses Kuenzel, Williams. Bradley, Bonney 


H. Mohr 


PIANO SOLO 


Rondo 
Miss A. Kreeger 


Rathbun 


DUET 


Minuet 
Misses Cleeland and Baldwin 


Schubert 


PIANO SOLO 


Magarische Weise 
Miss J. McCurdy 


Kolling 


QUARTET 


Swedish Wedding March 

ses Brown, Anderson Rowland and Rhoads 


Sodermann 


PIANO SOLO 


Faust 

Miss K. Kunkle 


Low 


DUET 


The Marionettes 

Masters Denny and Rosenbaum 


Lynes 


PIANO SOLO 


Robin's Lullaby 
Miss E. Hamilton 


Krogmann 


DUET 


Pavanne Favorite de Louis XIV 
Misses Powell and Cleeland 


Brisson 


PIANO SOLO 


To a Rosebud 

Miss J. Neft 


Steele 


QUARTET 


Menuett 
Hisses O'Neill, Eby, Sides, and Fulmor 


Boccherini 


PIANO SOLO 


Minuet 
Miss L. Bonney 


Scharwenka 


TRIO 


Cavallerie Marsch 
Misses Huggard, Mustln and Burns 


Wilhelm 


DUO 


Simple Aveu 
Misses Baldwin and Powell 


Thome 


PIANO SOLO 


The March King's Daughter 
Master W. Kohler 


Schnecker 


TRIO 


Yellow Jonquils 


Johanning 



57 



6th Concert 



Philadelphia Musical Academy 

Civen by the Pupils of the 

INTERMEDIATE DEPARTMENT 

Saturday Afternoon, May 9th, 1903, at 3 o'clock 

At Griffith Hall, 1420 Chestnut St. 





Programme 




DUET 


Colonial Dames 

Misses Ringe and Borden 


Schnecker 


PIANO SOLO 


Dressed for the Ball 

Miss M. MacDowell 


Lange 


TRIO 


Marche 

Meyerhoff. Munroe and Master Haydn 


Streabbog 


PIANO SOLO 


On the Meadow 
Miss J. Strickland 


Lichner 


DUO 


Polonaise 

Misses Heritage and Jocher 


Humrr.el 


VIOLIN SOLO 


(a) Heimweh 
(4) Perpetual Motion 
Miss Delia Simmons 


Jungmann 
Bohm 


PIANO SOLO 


Dance of the Sylphs 

Miss H. Harrison 


Heins 


DUET 


A Merry Dance 

Misses Colladay and Albert 


Low 


• PIANO SOLO 


Santa Claus Guards 
Miss A. Perkins 


Krogman 


PIANO SOLO 


Dream of a Bride 

Miss E. Crawford 


Wenzel 


TRIO 


Rondo 

Misses Gseller, Ely and Starkey 


Gobbaerts 


PIANO SOLO 


Sylphs and Sirens 

Miss R. Moore 


Schytte 


PIANO SOLO 


(a) A Happy Hour 

(6) Neapolitan Air 

Miss A. Lapetina 


Novara 
Schmoll 


DUET 


Daisies and Buttercups 
Misses Price and Cartledge 


Sartorio 


PIANO SOLO 


Menuetto 
Miss V. Benner 


Haydn 


PIANO SOLO 


Soldier's Song 


Rbod» 



program 



Ifirst part 



Sonata, G major, Op. 13 

Lento doloroso, Allegro. 

Allegretto tranquillo. 
Allegro anima 



Grieg 



Songs 



a Madchen mit dem rothen ] 
Miindchen 



b Ach wenn ich doch ein 
Immchen war 



c Genesung 



Robert Fram 



Violin 
Ballade 



Moszkowski 



Steinway Pianoforte used. 



program 



Secono part 



Songs 

a O that we two were Maying . . Nevin 

b Her hair's a net of golden wires 

Battisom Haynes 

c I know of two bright eyes . Clutsan 



Violin 

Andante from 9th Concerto . 



. Spohr 



Songs 

a Fnilingsnacht 
b Heimkehr . 
c Die Lorelei 



. Schumann 

Richard Strauss 

. Liszt 



Violin 

Zigeunerweisen 



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577 th Concert 

of the 

Philadelphia Musical Academy 

Tuesday Evening, May 12th, 1903, at 8 o'clock 
At their Hall, 1617 Spruce St. 

Programme 



PIANO 




Witches Dance 

Mrs. C. Jeffers 


McDowell 


VOCAL 




(a) Airly Beacon 
(*) Allah 

Miss E. Smith 


Nevin 
Chadwick 


PIANO 




Concerto 

Miss F. Levy 


Schumann 


PIANO 




Caprice op. 33, No. 1 

Mr. A. Frankle 


Mendelssohn 


VIOLIN 


SOLO 


Fantasie Appassionata 

Miss M. Dickey 


Vieuxtemps 


PIANO 




(a) Romance f sharp major 
(6) Mazurka 


Schumann 

Wieniawski 


VOCAL 


(a 


) Si mes vers avaient des aisles 


Hahn 




(*) Marienwurmchen 

Miss E. Nachod 


Schumann 


PIANO 




La Fileuse 
Miss E. McCowen 


Raff 


VIOLINCELLO 


(a) Simple Aveu 
(A) Gavotte 

Mr. H. Henning 


Thome 
Popper 


PIANO 




Sonate op 53 (1st movement) 


Beethoven 


PIANO 




Tocatelle 

Miss A. Bates 


Dupont 


VOCAL 
PIANO 




(a) Ich grolle nicht 

(6) Ich hab' ein kleines Lied 

Mrs. Charles Klauder 

Rigaudon 

Miss F. Urban 


Schumann 
Bungert 

Raff 


VIOLIN SOLO 


Concerto No. 8 

Mr. J. Schaeffer 


Rode 


PIANO 




Polonaise c sharp minor 

Miss E.Grimes 


Chopin 


The Ste 


nway Grands are from N. Stetson & Co., mi 


Chestnut Street 



HP 



X 



Duet— "The Unfortunate." St. Saens 

SMiss Zeckwer and SMiss Williams 

"Dearest, when J look into thine eyes." ) 

"The butterfly is in love with the rose." J " 

"Thou art to me." Chadwick 

Miss Mary Williams 

"With a water-lily." | 

"A Swan." . > Grieg 

"The First Primrose." ) 

SMiss Marie Zeckwer 

Violin Solo- (?• ***"•_ VonFielitz 

I b. Mazurka Ubertass. . . . Wieniawski 

SMiss Baker 

"Oh ring upon my finger." Shumann 

"In this hour of the night." .... Tschaikowsky 

"Horn) deep the slumber of the floods." . . . Loewe 

"The <way of the 'world." Grieg 

Miss Williams 

"The Loreley." Liszt 

SMiss Zeckwer 

Violin Solo- Si.L'Cygne Saint Saens 

I b. Serenade rterne 

Miss Baker 

"The Robin sings in the apple-tree." ' 1 

"The west wind croons." . > MacDowell 

"Through the meadow." ■ ■ ) 
Miss Williams 

"L'Ete." \ _ , , 

"Berceuse."! Chammade 

"Spring Flowers." Reineke 

{with Violin obligato) 
Miss Zeckwer 

Duet— "The Passage-Birds' farewell." . . Hildach 

SMiss Zeckwer and SMiss Williams 



M i s s M . 



Sli»s Marik Zi 



Miss Alice Bai 

BVBNING OF To E 



5$0 tb Concert 

of me 

Ipblla&dpbta flHusical Hca&emp 

Olven bt tbe 

(Brabuates '03 



miusical jfunD JHall 

Elsbtb ano locust Streets 

Satur5as Evening, /roap 30tb 
at 8 o'clocfc 



DiPLOMAftoRWuNa Musicians 

L„7„«* at Mn »'«> Fund Hall «h and 
Ker^.rTctol tt A ' aUSPi ^ « *'""" 
numbers precX .h^SK",^ """" 
diplomas teacher*' ffiMPfrlbutlon ot 
medals tn • •,„ . IWcates and gold 

orchestra of thlrtfn 1 ! 11 ^ 6 - Th6 pu »" s ' 

LenT Bu & r h ke. en pla B „f U "l S t h include M '» 

Alice Weir. LilS Bern' in,? r A l T Ce J- ery - 
aWarv' jfi£S§ S£*te 

Bowden thSryT M .'.^ojff fSKS 



. 



■' •>•» graduates win take 



~ 'cueive cen 

n < S- Wer gold 



ha a 



in L.iir concert 
[ adelphia Musk 



b ' u,Jual w will take Dart 
-morrow night. The Phll- 
Acaderoy was established 



(L 



Graduates in Mimic. 
The sraJ?;'*,": 1 " ' x, : rcisp - "f th. Phlla- 
,u.:my ucrc ie id yes- 
terday in MusicaLjFund $41. Awards 




Ethel Bo 
! Miss Jan. 

Miss Florence Lev 
Miss Lulu Berry 
I Vocfl Departm " 

I Apple 
I Mary 



.Miss Helen Carpenter. Miss 



Annual Spring Concert 



GIVEN BY THE ADVANC 

Germantovvn 

OF THE 

Philadelphia 

(PIANO AND V' 



Tuesday, May 26, 1903 

Eight o'clock 



160 



I* 



\ 



& 



\ 



# 



- ' -v-.'.- : 



* 



MANUSCRIPT 
MUSIC &&& 
SOCIETY ^ ^ 



Report 

&/>e BOARD OF DIRECTION 



1901-1902 



* 



ffmptl's ©rcbestra 



Miss G. Keppelman Miss A. Baker Miss R. Jackson 

Miss M. Zeckwer Mr. O. Wittich 

Mr. W. Abendroth Mr. J. Schaeffer Miss M. Dickey 

II VIOLIN 

Miss L. Keeley Miss M. Opdike Miss M. Pennypacker 

Miss D. Simmons Miss A. Sinitzky 

Miss F. Voshage Miss K. Knapp 



VIOLAS 

Mr. E. Schmidt (Teacher) 
Mr. J. Hopkins 
Mr. L. Freeman 



VIOLONCELLO 

Mr. W. Schmidt 
Mr. A. Hassler 
Mr. H. Henning 



DOUBLE BASS 

Mr. J. Fasshauer (Teacher) 
Mr. G. Merrill 



CLARINETS 

Miss J. Lang 



TRUMPETS 

Miss G. Daily 



TIMPANI 

Mr. O. Quinto 



TRUMBONES 

Miss F. Rogerson 



OBOES 

Miss Anna Bates 



BASSOONS 

Miss C. Ziegler 



HORN 

Miss F. Levy 



GREAT DRUMS 

Mr. A. Schwartz 



. - 




programme 

Overture— Zampa ........ Herald 

Pupils' Orchestra (under the direction of Prof. Carl Samans) 

Piano Solo— Ballade, a flat . . . . . . Chopin 

Miss Florence Levy 

Concerto FOR Piano and Orchestra— g minor . . Mendelssohn 

First Movement, Miss Alice Weir 

Last Movement, Miss Jane Duncan Calhoun 

VOCAL— Arioso from "The Death of Jeanne d'Arc" . . . Bemberg 

Miss Mary E. Williams 

f (a) Witches' Dance ..... MacDowell 

PIANO SOLO {$)' Etude . ..... Chopin 

Miss Lena Burke 
Concerto for Piano and Orchestra— a minor . . . Schumann 

Miss Elizabeth McNab 
VOCAL— Air from Freischiitz— " Wie nahte mir der Schlumraer . Weber 

Miss Marie Zeckwer 
PIANO SOLO— Fantasie Impromptu ..... Chopin 

Miss Lulu Berry 
Concertstuck ........ Weber 

Mr. Elmfr Crouthers 
Piano and Orchestra— Polonaise, op. 22 . . . Chopin 

Miss Ethel Bowman 

Vocal Duet— The Gypsies ...... Brahms 

Misses M. Zeckwer and M. Williams 
Concerto for Piano and Orchestra .... Grieg 

Miss Carolyn Fretz 
Piano— Barcarolle ........ Mosxkowski 

Miss Martha C. Parker 

Distribution of Diplomas, Teachers' Certificates and Gold Medals 

Orchestra— Coronation March ...... Krelschmer 

The Steinway Grands are from N. Stetson & Co.. No. mi Chestnut St. 



Annual Spring Concert 



GIVEN BY THE ADVANCED PUPILS OF THE 

Germantown Branch 

OF THE 

Philadelphia Musical Academy 

* (PIANO AND VOCAL DEPARTMENTS) 



Tuesday, May 26, 1903 

Eight °' dock Association Hall 



' 



1* 



* 



1NUSCRIPT 

JvS'IC -^ ^ & 
CIILTY ^ & 



Report 

E6e BOARD OF DIRECTION 



1901-1902 



160 







MANUSCRIPT 
MUSIC & & & 
SOCIETY ^ ^ 



Report 

of 
&/>e BOARD OF DIRECTION 



1901-1902 



N ACCORDANCE with the sentiment unanimously 
expressed at the last annual meeting of the Society, 
it was decided by the Board of Direction to enter 
upon a broader policy in the arrangement of pro- 
grams. The Program Committee was therefore 
authorized to present at each concert at least one 
unpublished work of an outside composer, and to 
invite the composer himself to be present to play or 
direct his own work. Moreover, the Board had 
incurred the obligation of performing the prize 
composition at the next public concert. Thereupon it was 
proposed to reverse the usual order and open, rather than 
close the season, with a public concert. The plan was carried 
out and the Board felt much encouraged by the enthusiasm 
which followed upon the performance of November 20th, 1901, 
of which the program, with Mr. Berwald, the prize winner, 
taking the place of honor, was as follows : — 



Part Songs 



Nicholas Douty 



Quintette, Piano and Strings William Berwald 

Prize Composition 



3 Group of Songs 

a " Come Home" Gertrude II. Swift 

b " I)y the Wood " Henry A. Lang 

c " The Water Lily " A. Mailerl Zellner 

4 Fantasie for Violin and Piano W. IV. Gilchrist 

5 Group of Songs 

a " Thou Gentle Gazer" Stanley Addicki 

b " Summer Night " •) 

c "Adoration" \ Mariihii>ik<l-Zimm:nii t ni 

it " Love a' Maying " J 

6 Piano Pieces Maurits Lecfson 

a "Mazurka" 
b "Minuetto" 
c " Valse Sentimentale " 

7 Part Songs 

a •• Wind and Sea " Frank G. Cauff man 

b " Daybreak " Philip H. Gcepp 



KW INTEREST in the Society seemed to be aroused 
and it was resolved to repeat the experiment. The 
concert of January 28th, 1902, was then given, this 
time with the assistance of Mr. Hemy Eichheim, of 
Boston, an outside composer, and Mr. Bruno Oscar 

Klein, recently elected an honorary member. The program 

in full read : — 

Program II 

1 Quintette for Piano and Strings (Op. 5), Camillc W. Zeckwer 

2 Songs for Tenor Bruno Oscar Klein 

n " Zigeunerkind's Geheimniss " (Tbe Gypsy's Secret) 

/' " 1!iiIlt niuluiuk-ii l;;uuiicn " ( Under Blovsuming Trees) 
r "Zwei Rosen" (Two Roses) 

Nicholas Doutv 

3 Sonata for Violin and Piano Henry Eicliheint 

4 Songs for Soprano W. W. Gilchrist 

I, "A Descant" 












PM 






T ONE of the private concerts, that of February 16th, 
1902, Mr. Henry Holden Huss, of New York, played 
his sonata for violin and piano. 

This plan of widening the field of composers 
has proved markedly successful. In spite of the 
expense of two public concerts the season closes with 
a good balance in the treasury, #221.22. 

There has been an increase in the membership, and 
the private meetings have been more largely attended than 
heretofore. 

In consideration of these facts the Board strongly 
recommends that the new policy be continued. 

It is our painful duty to record the death of one of out- 
most valued composer members, Mrs. J. Ross Corbin, who 
died on October 7th, 1902, after a lingering illness. Mrs. 
Corbin was a musician of rare ability and devotion, and her 
compositions, which were performed on public as well as pri- 
vate programs of the Society, show a true originality and 



5 Violincello Solo . . . 

Suite in F for 'Cello i 



6 Novellette for String Quartet and Horn, Frank G. Cauffn, 



1*HE COMPLETE LIST of works performed during the 
year is as follows : — 

List of Works Performed During the Season of 
i 90 1- 1 902 

AddicKS, Stanley Song, Anthem 

BARTON, Dr. Isaac 2 Organ Solos 

Berwald, William Quintette for Piano and Strings 

CaufFMAN, Frank G., Part-song, Novelette for String Quartette and Horn, 
Quintette for mixed voices 

Chadwick, Georce W 3 Songs, Anthem 

Crozier, David E Hymn 

Douty, Nicholas 2 Part-songs 

Eichheim, Henry Sonata for Violin and Piano 

Foote, Arthur, Duet (vocal), Melndy f'i \ inliu :uM i'i: , Quartette, Op. 23, 

for Piano, Violin, 'Cello and Violin, Anthem 

Gilchrist, Dr. W. W Fantasie for Violin and Piano, 6 Songs, Hymn 

Goepp, Philip H Part-song, 4 Songs 

Hahn, Frederick E 3 Songs, Melody for Violin 

Heckscher, Celeste D Piano Comp. (Impromptu) 

Held, Emil Canon for Piano 

Huss, Henry Holden .... Sonata for Violin and Piano, Melody for Violin 
Klein, Bruno Oscar, Suite in F for 'Cello and Orchestra (arranged for 'Cello 
and Piano), 4 songs 

Lang, Henry A 6 Characteristic Pieces for Piano, I Song 

Leefson, Mauritz 3 Piano Pieces 

Matthews, Harry A Sacred Song 

Mohr, Herman 2 Piano Solos, Rondo Brilliante for 2 Pianos 

Paine, Prof. J. K Organ Solo 

VON Sternberg, ConstaNTIN, Trio for Piano, Violin and 'Cello, 4 Piano Pieces 

Swift, Gertrude H Song 

Thompson, Garrett W 3 Songs 

Zeckwer, Camille W. . . Suite for Violin and Piano, Quintette for Piano and 
Strings, Piano Piece (Concert Etude) 

Zellner, A. M Song 

Zimmerman, Mrs. Marie Kunkel ? Sonrre 



TREASURER'S REPORT 

For the Year Ending October 14th, 1902 



Receipts 

1 retiring Treasurer $I9 2 -93 

members, as dues 54 2 -5° 

Public Concert November 20th, 1 901 .... 64.50 

" January 28th, 1902 48. 00 

interest on deposits 2.85 

Total Receipts 

Disbursements 

>. 102 8150.40 

1. 103 56.65 

1. 104 203. 58 

,.105 80.75 

1. 106 60.09 

,.107 37-So 

1. 108 40.29 

Total Disbursements 

Balance in Treasury 



Respectfully submitted, 
E. 
Signed 

Frank G. Cauffman, President. 
Alice Huev Bedford, Secretary. 



ilERMAN, 

Trem 






PROGRAH 



SYMPHONY CLASS Tannhaeuser Overture 

Mrs. Hoyt, Miss Carpenter, Mr. Clark and Miss Funk 

VOCAL a Allah 

b Halt! 
Miss Marsaretta Bullus 



a Wie bist du meine Konigin 
b Hark 1 Hark ! The Lark 
Miss Ethel Upjohn 



a Old German Love Rhyme 
6 Cradel Song 

Mrs. Thomas Wistar 



a Si Mes Vers Avraient Des Aisles 
6 Marienwurmchen 

Miss Bessie Noohod 



Mendelssohn 



Ich Grolle Nicht 
Ich Hab' Ein Kleines Lied 
Mrs. Charles Z. Klauder 



VOCAL TRIO 



a Stilles Wasser Heymann-Rheineck 

b Was Streift Vorbei Heymann-Rheineck 

Miss Upjohn, Mrs. Klauder and Mrs. Wistar 



SYMPHONY CLASS Wedding March Mendelssohn 

Mrs. Hoyt, Miss Carpenter, Mr. Clark and Miss Funk 



STEINWAY PIANOS USED 



T^HE GERMANTOWN BRANCH of the well-known Philadel- 
phia Musical Academy was opened sixteen years ago by Mr. 
Richard Zeckwer. // as the only Conservatory of Music in German- 
town, and offers advantages to its students that they could not possi- 
bly obtain by private teaching. The curriculum includes all branches 
of music, and the teachers are all well known artists in their profes- 
sion. Both private and class lessons given. 

The class system taught in this Academy is adopted, not be- 
cause it is the cheapest, but because it is the best manner of en- 
couraging interest and ambition in the student. Many other 
advantages are also offered through the many lessons given them 
gratuitously, such as Theory, Symphony and Ensemble Classes, etc. 

The school since 1897 has been under the direction of Mr. 
Camille W. Zeckwer, who is desirous to sustain and increase its re- 
putation. 



There are accommodations for 500 students, 
open September the eighth, 1903. 



The classes re- 



For circulars apply to 



CnriiLLE V. Zeckwer 

PROPRIETOR 5H5 DIRECTOR 
60Z9 MAIN STREET, GERMHNTOWN